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Print 15 comment(s) - last by inperfectdarkn.. on Dec 29 at 10:20 AM

Stealthy drone solution can detect enemy ships even in cases where sonar is limited

Modern submarine designs rely on sonar to "see" enemy vessels, but terrain features like ocean banks can obscure vision, preventing reliable hunting.  These limitations are common referred to as "line of sight" (LOS) problems.

But the wonders of robotics may soon change that.  Drone-maker AeroVironment has created a special maritime-ready unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), which stealthily hovers over the sea eying enemy ships and transmitting what it sees to a lurking submarine.

Submarine drone
An artist's rendering of the Switchblade drone in flight [Image Source: AeroVironment]

Raytheon Comp. (RTN) is helping to give the marine drone a leg up, by creating a launch vehicle for it.  The submerged launch vehicle (SLV) will jettison from the submarine's trash shoot and quietly make its way to the surface.  From there it will eject the UAV into flight.

The new drone is part of a collection of projects dubbed Submarine Over-The-Horizon Organic Capabilities (SOTHOC).  In 2008 Raytheon demonstrated similar capabilities from a "over-the-side" launch by a drone-containing SLV thrown literally over the side of a surface vessel.

The SLV is a rather ingenious construct.  It consists of weighted ballast, which sinks the craft for a certain amount of time, allowing the submarine to move away from the launch position.  After a given amount of time, these weights are released and a float collar inflates, bringing the package to the surface.  The delayed release, again, is design to obfuscate the attacker's true location.

A drogue (a parachute like construct) is deployed to steady the SLV amidst the choppy ocean, while a vane aligns it into the wind.  The tube's control electronics pivot the surfaced, oriented tube at a 35 angle.  The tube then fires, hurling the UAV up into the wind and off on its way.

Raytheon launcher
The Raytheon SLV has a complex launch process design to obfuscate the attacker's location.
[Image Source: Raytheon]

The device will be tested during the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 exercise, the latest edition of the world's largest multi-national maritime exercise, conducted biennially on even years in Hawaii.  Raytheon is currently perfecting five SLVs and working with AeroVironment to tune its squadron of seven UAVs.

Recent "justification and approval" (J&A) documents indicate that Raytheon in late 2008 conducted a successful launch from periscope depth.  The next step is to conduct a launch from a deeper cruising depth.

If Raytheon and AeroVironment can pull off that technical feat in time for RIMPAC 2012, they may just revolutionize sea warfare in a small way and give the U.S. another small technological leg up on its foreign rivals like China.

In related news, similar military research and development work is being put towards developing unmanned subs, which in a future war fleet could complement larger human-manned subs, while reducing weight requirements and human life risks.

Source: Aviation Week [URL shortened]



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A New Drone
By Lanek2 on 12/26/2011 5:13:41 PM , Rating: 5
Great! Something else to give to the Iranians.




RE: A New Drone
By AssBall on 12/26/2011 6:06:24 PM , Rating: 2
What are they going to do with it? Learn how to harpoon our nuclear subs from their dinghies?


RE: A New Drone
By Skywalker123 on 12/26/2011 6:35:44 PM , Rating: 2
If Iran is so backward then why all the paranoia and demonizing?


RE: A New Drone
By Cypherdude1 on 12/26/2011 6:55:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Great! Something else to give to the Iranians.
LOL. Yes, perhaps the Iranians will take over the drone, have it turn around and attack the sub.


RE: A New Drone
By Noya on 12/26/11, Rating: 0
RE: A New Drone
By Reclaimer77 on 12/26/2011 11:04:22 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
If Iran is so backward then why all the paranoia and demonizing?


I think Iran has earned all the "demonizing" they have gotten. In fact I would say they have worked HARD for their current status.

Forget anything militarily or nuclear related. Do you realize how many times they've been cited for human rights violations alone? I guess they get a free pass on that too though...


RE: A New Drone
By inperfectdarkness on 12/29/2011 10:20:18 AM , Rating: 2
let's not forget that they're going to behead a woman for adultery. human rights at its finest.


RE: A New Drone
By Uncle on 12/27/11, Rating: 0
RE: A New Drone
By TSS on 12/26/2011 7:02:06 PM , Rating: 2
Just because it's a nuclear sub doesn't mean a depth charge dropped from a canoo won't kill it. An explosive is an explosive.

The big advantage subs have is nobody knows where they are. If these drones have technology capable of detecting even american subs.... the iranians would love to have it. Even if they can't fully copy it. It's still unlikely they'd ever be able to kill a nuclear sub sure, but it's better to not take any chances. Just build in a reliable auto-destruct this time.


RE: A New Drone
By SlyNine on 12/26/2011 7:56:42 PM , Rating: 2
God, its like we forget we're are talking about the US Navy here. It's not like they are a bunch of pussies. I'm sure Iran would think twice before attacking.


RE: A New Drone
By V-Money on 12/26/2011 8:14:29 PM , Rating: 2
I'm trying to figure out when you would actually use this. On the missions I was on we were all about stealth. Sending a drone into the air is kind of a giveaway to start looking for one of our submarines. If there were no enemy submarines in the area I guess it wouldn't be much risk, but you can never be sure. As a funny side note, when using a periscope you have to take special precautions to avoid detection, one is to limit how much time you are up because seagulls will sometimes land on the periscope and a spinning seagull is a good giveaway of your location.

quote:
If these drones have technology capable of detecting even american subs...
I wouldn't worry too much about that, we were able to escape detection from P-3's, and these look to be designed for detecting surface ships.

quote:
It's still unlikely they'd ever be able to kill a nuclear sub sure, but it's better to not take any chances.
There would be no chance in hell it could go up against HY-80.


Seaquest DSV anyone?
By dethrophes on 12/26/2011 3:24:12 PM , Rating: 2
Am I the only one getting falsh backs to Seaquest DSV whiskers?




RE: Seaquest DSV anyone?
By ekv on 12/28/2011 2:44:19 AM , Rating: 3
Life imitating Art? Satellites -- drones / tethered WP7 / whatever -- are a good idea.

Of course, Seaquest didn't have somebody saying "can I have my drone back, puhleaze."


But can it detect Chinese subs?
By TerranMagistrate on 12/26/2011 8:58:01 PM , Rating: 2
RE: But can it detect Chinese subs?
By V-Money on 12/27/2011 2:02:43 PM , Rating: 2
(Please correct me if I'm wrong) I don't think this is meant to search for subs, I'm pretty sure its mostly a way to give an aerial view of surface warships. I read the article and didn't see any specific mentioning of detecting submarines.

quote:
But can it detect Chinese subs?

Talking from personal experience, tracking diesel subs isn't easy. Diesel subs (some of the new models) are quieter than our nuclear subs, and our nuclear subs can go undetected almost anywhere. Going after a surface ship is a joke because they have no idea you are coming, and making it past a couple subs isn't very difficult if they don't know you are coming and you have plenty of background noise (I.E. a whole carrier fleet.) Remember, subs don't normally use active sonar, they rely on passive.


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