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  (Source: Gizmag)
Stock is battered ahead of Tuesday's earnings report

Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KRX:005930) is one of the world's most coveted brands.  It sells more smartphones than any other company, globally.  It produces more computer memory chips (NAND, DRAM) than any other manufacturer.  And it still is the top LCD TV seller.

But being king of many a market, Samsung finds itself more under the investor microscope than ever.  As South Korea's markets opened Friday morning shares of Samsung's public stock continued their slide, hitting
>W1.290M (Korean Won) (~$1,222 USD), the lowest level since August 2013.

I. The Boom

From mid 2011 to June 2013, Samsung was on a rip.  With steady gains to both unit shipments and earnings margins, Samsung positioned itself as the most profitable and ubiquitous Android phonemaker, rivalling America's Apple, Inc. (AAPL).  Shares more than doubled from round W680K/share (~$644 USD) in mid-2011 to W1.584M (~$1,500 USD) earlier this year.



But much like Apple, Samsung has been facing concerns of a slowing high end smartphone market.  Apple largely escaped unscathed, with shares actually climbing more than a quarter from their mid-2013 lows.



For Samsung it's been a bumpier ride -- after hitting a recent low of W1.209M (~$1,150 USD) earlier last August, it climbed to W1.500M (~$1,420 USD) over Q3 2013, before fear once more began to influence trading.

Analysts feared a Q3 meltdown.  Instead Samsung Electronics left analysts confused and conflicted.  While it outperformed expectations, shipping 89 million smartphones (including 18 million Galaxy S4s) and earning an operating profit of W6.28T ($6.3B USD) on sales of W35.2T ($33.1B USD), it also warned of a potentially slow (calendar) Q4 2013 and Q1 2014.

Shares have been sliding since the start of December, but after a negative guidance from a top guidance source, selling really picked up pace on Thursday and Friday.

II. Gloomy Outlook

The bad news came via a Q4 earnings prediction from Starmine SmartEstimate, whose earnings predictions are widely considered an industry gold standard.  FMR -- controlled by multi-billionaire Edward C. “Ned” Johnson III -- is the parent of Fidelity Investments and Fidelity National Financial Inc. (FNF) (a mortgage lender).  Fidelity Investments' "Emerging Markets" mid-to-high risk growth fund is a large shareholder in Samsung Electronics.  Starmine is a research venture of Fidelity Investments and news service Thomson Reuters.

Starmine weights analyst estimates based on their performance history, a key to its accuracy.  In a report to its clients this week it predicted Samsung to earn W9.9T ($9.385B USD), a 3.6 percent quarter-on-quarter drop from Q3's operating profit of W10.16T ($9.63B USD).

Samsung Galaxy S4

Overall analysts aren't quite that pessimistic, if you take an unweighted average.  An unweight average of 40 top analysts from Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S expects a profit of W10.3T (~$9.76B USD) -- a record.  But there's cause to believe that Starmine's numbers might be closer to the mark. 

Perhaps tellingly some of the most pessimistic analyses are actually coming from Samsung's home nation; Industrial Bank of Korea (KRX:024110) analyst Lee Seung-Woo gave a gloomy comment to Reuters, remarking:

We expect Samsung's performance to be about 9.5 trillion won, lower than the market consensus of around 10.2 trillion won. The biggest reason would be the won-dollar exchange rate, followed by shrinking margins in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) sale.

An even harsher estimate comes courtesy of BNP Parabas SA (EPA:BNP) whose analyst Peter Yu is predicting a severe 14 percent drop in profit to W8.8T ($8.34B USD).

III. Strong Won Breeds Problems

Aside from a potential lucrative payout to Apple regarding smartphone patent litigation, increasing pressure on smartphone component sales, bonuses owed to top executives, and slower than hoped sales in the pricey fledgling OLED TV display segment, perhaps Samsung's biggest problem is one its fellows Korean companies are facing as well -- a strong Won.  In early 2009 a U.S. dollar would get you W1,500.  Today it will get you about W1,050.

Korean Won
The Won has soared in strength, but that has led to headaches for top local corporations.
[Image Source: Bloomberg]

The strengthening won leads to a glass-half-full, glass-half-empty sort of scenario.  On the glass half full side, the over 5 percent rise in the value of the Won means that in USD, the hit to Samsung's market cap since the December slump is only 15 percent, versus 18.5 percent if you don't factor in inflation.

On the flip side, the strong Won is causing real problem for Samsung's domestic efforts in South Korea, as it makes it difficult to bring money back into the country.  In Q4 the average inflation rate fell to 0.8 percent, down from 1.23 in Q3. 

U.S. v. South Korea inflation

By contrast the U.S. mustered 1.23 percent, just a cut below the EU average of 1.3.  Japan also suffered from weak inflation in late 2012 earlier this year, but it is expected to fare much better in Q4.  In Japan inflation climbed to above 1.2 percent in Q4, over halfway to the target (2 percent) set by the Bank of Japan (TYO:8301).

IV. iPhone 5S Surges Ahead of Galaxy S4 in the U.S.

In terms of smartphones, Samsung had a tough slog ahead for Q4 no matter how you cut it.  Samsung's Galaxy Note 3 was impressive but did not appear to give Samsung the firepower it needed to counter Apple's Sept. 20 launch of the colorful iPhone 5C -- a mid-range handset -- and the high end flagship model, the iPhone 5S.

In U.S. sales Apple is expected to emerge the clear winner in Q4 U.S. sales, having held the #1 spot (with the iPhone 5S) and either the #2 or the #3 spot (with the iPhone 5C) on every major U.S. carrier, according to Canaccord Genuity analyst T. Michael summary of sales channel surveys. 

iPhone 5S

The remaining spot was taken by the Samsung S4, which remains a steady seller, if a bit under the 10 million units per month Samsung was hoping for.  The Galaxy Note 3, however, hasn't seen very strong sales as buyers appear a bit hesitant in jumping at the 5.7-inch screen.  Sales of the Note 3 are expected to be around 5-6 million units.

Samsung is trying to remain patient with regards to its "Galaxy Gear" project -- the companion smartwatch to the note.  It's believed to have moved about 1 million units.  While that's rather phenomenal in a way, given how overpriced and underfeatured the device is, on the flip side Samsung may have spent as much advertising the new product as it made off the profit margins.

Galaxy Note 3

However, regardless of its earnings for the quarter there's little doubt that Samsung will be far and away the most profitable Android OEM.  And it continues to pursue a diverse long term strategy, spending deeply on research into next generation technologies, and strengthening its patent presence in America and the European Union.

All eyes will be on Samsung when it reports its earnings on Tuesday Jan. 7.  Apple will announce its earnings two weeks later on Tuesday, Jan. 21.

Source: Reuters



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Wndows
By Quicksand Jesus on 1/3/2014 7:17:55 AM , Rating: 1
I'm starting to have this sinking feeling that Windows is gonna be the winner for tablets, laptops, and phones this year.




RE: Wndows
By CaedenV on 1/3/14, Rating: 0
RE: Wndows
By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 9:14:41 AM , Rating: 1
"I'm starting to have this sinking feeling that Windows is gonna be the winner for tablets, laptops, and phones this year."

Then you need to wake up. Laptops yes, the rest not even a close second. At the very best estimates they will still be an extreme distant 3rd in phones and tablets. This year will end exactly as the last Android will take the #1 spot in phones and tablets, Apple will take the #1 spot in profits and MS will clean up the distant 3rd spot as BB slides even further into irrelevancy.


RE: Wndows
By Nortel on 1/3/14, Rating: 0
RE: Wndows
By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 10:32:58 AM , Rating: 2
"I don't think anyone is saying Win phones will move up to second place."

Except that guy.

"I'm starting to have this sinking feeling that Windows is gonna be the winner for tablets, laptops, and phones this year"


RE: Wndows
By Flunk on 1/3/2014 9:24:32 AM , Rating: 1
I'm ready to predict Windows Phone gaining 100% increase in market share. That would give it a staggering 2%. It's a nice alternative to iOS, but it's not a good alternative to Android because the platform is so locked down.

A lot of those phones will probably be low to mid-end smartphones purchased at $0 - $50 after contract. If Nokia has proved anything it's that they can make a decent cheap phone.


RE: Wndows
By Belegost on 1/3/2014 10:22:38 AM , Rating: 3
Well, according to Gartner, WinPhone has 3.6% of the market (as of Q3, Q4 results aren't out yet) so doubling that would give 7% of the market, which is significant considering that iOS only took 12% (and Q3 is the big quarter for the 5s 5c launch) I don't think marketshare will double, but I do see it continuing to increase.

Also the growth will be on the back of phones priced $80-150 US without contract - most places in the world don't offer subsidized phones, and the majority of the world's population does not have the disposable income to afford $500-700 US for a phone. This is why Nokia is still number two in total mobile phone shipments, feature phones are still the majority of sales because they are cheap. Having quality entry-level smartphones like the L520 selling for as low as $50 US puts a smartphone within reach for a lot of would be feature phone buyers.

Source:
http://bgr.com/2013/11/14/windows-phone-blackberry...


RE: Wndows
By Tony Swash on 1/3/14, Rating: -1
RE: Wndows
By ven1ger on 1/3/2014 1:49:13 PM , Rating: 2
Subscription based apps such as Office 365.


RE: Wndows
By retrospooty on 1/3/14, Rating: -1
RE: Wndows
By Tony Swash on 1/4/2014 12:18:20 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
I would say they need to work on making their OS better and platforms more attractive so that more people want them and buy them first.


That's a possible recipe for increasing sales and maybe market share but not a recipe for making money. At the moment almost no OEM is actually buying WinPhone licences.

I was intrigued by several articles I saw saying that Microsoft should fork Android (thus immediately getting all those Android apps to run on their platform) and bake in all the Microsoft services and software (Office, enterprise integration), beef up the security above Google Android and go all out for the enterprise device market. Interesting idea.


RE: Wndows
By retrospooty on 1/4/2014 6:11:25 PM , Rating: 2
Well, they need sales and market share to even begin to think about making money with it. This 3-4% Isnt enough volume to make much of anything.

That would be interesting but somehow I feel like the current Microsoft with the way they operate lately would find a way to screw it up no matter what. They still seem more concerned with making products with BS tricks and limitations that push their own agendas rather than making products with the features customers want. maybe the new management will shake that up hopefully they have got the message


RE: Wndows
By kmmatney on 1/3/2014 5:05:48 PM , Rating: 2
Well, as someone who has switched recent;y from iPhone to Android, I have to say I feel a little bit more locked down with Android so far. With the iPhone, it was easy to Jailbreak, and everything worked great. With my new Android phone (LG Optimus Pro G) I have rooted it, but newer ROMS are buggy, and getting simple things to work like tethering and a Wiimote bluetooth connection has been a nightmare. I like my new 5.5" screen, but the reality is that I was less "locked-down" with my iPhone.


RE: Wndows
By Argon18 on 1/4/14, Rating: 0
RE: Wndows
By retrospooty on 1/4/2014 5:55:09 PM , Rating: 2
Even I have to agree with you on this one, at least with phones and tablets.


RE: Wndows
By troysavary on 1/6/2014 4:30:29 AM , Rating: 3
Yeah, no one is buying Windows laptops. That is why more Windows laptops sold than all other laptop OS combined. More Windows licenses were sold than Android and ChromeOS together. Yep, no one is buying Windows.


Very biased
By euler007 on 1/3/2014 8:34:53 AM , Rating: 2
The numbers focus on the US sales for the three months after a new iphone. To make a straight comparison you'd have to look at the entire lifecycle of the phones, which will wind up being iphone 5 vs S4+S5+Note3 over at least 18 months.

And global sales please.




RE: Very biased
By Flunk on 1/3/2014 9:28:46 AM , Rating: 2
You understand this is a US web site right?


RE: Very biased
By JasonMick (blog) on 1/3/2014 9:49:30 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
Very biased
by euler007 on January 3, 2014 at 8:34 AM

The numbers focus on the US sales for the three months after a new iphone.
How is it biased?
quote:
However, regardless of its earnings for the quarter there's little doubt that Samsung will be far and away the most profitable Android OEM. And it continues to pursue a diverse long term strategy, spending deeply on research into next generation technologies, and strengthening its patent presence in America and the European Union.
Seems to me my commentary is relatively positive.

quote:
To make a straight comparison you'd have to look at the entire lifecycle of the phones, which will wind up being iphone 5 vs S4+S5+Note3 over at least 18 months.
I agree with your sentiments. My analysis wasn't meant to discuss Samsung's year-long outlook, just the upcoming quarter or two. I did briefly mention my thoughts on its long term outlook (see above) and I -- like you -- am hopeful about it.

This piece was meant simply to talk about Samsung's situation for this quarter. Note nowhere do I suggest that Samsung is being outsold globally or will be outsold in the long term, I just point out the view held by nearly all analysts that the iPhone top two models (5C/5S) outsold Samsung's top two models (Note 3/S4) in the U.S. -- the world's most profitable market -- for at least one quarter.

This situation will likely last one more quarter, unless Samsung surprises with a GS5 at CES or something. Surprises aside, it will probably be a half and half year, with each company reigning for a pair of quarters while its products are fresh.
quote:
And global sales please.
Again, I put U.S. sales, as they generally drive a large share (a half or more) of smartphone OEM profits, as other large markets like China, while important, tend to have thin margins. Also generally European sales follow American sales to some extent.

Also I looked but didn't really see any global sales numbers. The South Korean analysts (inc. the IBK one I cite) haven't really estimated that yet, as far as I've seen). If you have any #s, drop me a link and I'll add it to the piece.

What is my BIG PICTURE view? Here's my thoughts.

Could Samsung retake the lead in the U.S. with the Galaxy S5 early next year? Sure. But for the next quarter or two it is expected to trail the iPhone in sales. I think the bigger win for Apple is that the iPhone 5C is outselling the Galaxy Note 3 (which is likely in fourth place).

The big thing -- as some of the other comments allude to -- is that competition ... from Nokia to Motorola to Lenovo ... is heating up. Samsung delivered a solid device, but arguably underwhelmed with the Galaxy S4.

Its prior customers were happy enough and it did a good job with its marketing campaign, aside from the strange unveil event. However, most reviewers favored the HTC One... Given the great job Samsung did marketing and HTC's part licensing fee-driven, part management-driven implosion it was still able to be the sales king.

But next year, with all the competition, it will have to deliver much more aggressively -- which is good news for Samsung and fans of other Android and Windows phone OEMs alike (and Apple fans too). Competition is good.

I think ASUSTek is a potential sleeper in the Android game as its FonePad concept is very novel and fun. Don't be surprise if it climbs up the ranks in 2014, although it will need a year or two to pose a serious threat to Samsung. The biggest threat for next year likely will be from LG or perhaps Huawei.


RE: Very biased
By KPOM1 on 1/4/2014 9:51:11 PM , Rating: 3
Jason Mick can be accused of being a lot of things, but an Apple Fanboy is most certainly not one of them.

All he's saying is that Samsung may have reached a plateau for now and has some challenges sustaining its levels of growth. In that respect, they are a lot like Apple about 15 months ago.


Just horrible Daily Tech
By evo slevven on 1/3/2014 9:56:32 PM , Rating: 2
Because they tend to focus on US markets which emphasizes needless worries. If you look at other analysts and tech sites, they're focusing on how Apple is really failing with the low end iPhone especially in emerging markets.

While Windows Phones have strong spots in the camera and software, they still are really lacking the same ecosystem that the iOS and Android have established.

The one thing this article does hit the nail on is that Samsung has a greater diversity in phones from standard flips to smartphones. Samsung's problems are, however, fixable while Apples problems are not. I still think Apple is loosing consistently in establishing a real "innovation" sector in R&D; I don't really expect them to be like IBM in that area but you wouldn't want to bet money on a company that simply segments itself on looks and a slightly better interface. Realistically speaking with other malware like flashback making its rounds last year you can't also expect perceptions pertaining to Apple devices to continue; it's there and will be there. There's main market is really the tablet and phone and the fact that the iPad mini and iPhone5S takes a page from what they decried before (smaller tablets and bigger phones), they are following Android OEM's like Samsung and it's not an enviable position for someone like Apple to be in. Besides Samsung could always patent bigger phones and tablets and call it "anti-minimalistic" and sue them for it lol!




By ComputerJuice on 1/3/2014 10:07:08 PM , Rating: 1
I have no data or anything other than an opinion here... I dont want an i-anything, but having a good spec'd device in a small package is looking really appealing these days. I dont want a tablet in my pocket. A sub 4.5 device with top end specs would be great in a non-apple form. Samsung could make this but for some reason doesn't.




Samsung finally is starting to figure out ...
By web2dot0 on 1/3/14, Rating: -1
By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 7:35:54 AM , Rating: 2
"Samsung is finally figuring out that high end phone market was never theirs to win. The battle have already been won"

That's more than just a bit off. Samsung does extremely well in the high end phone market. The S2,Note, S3, Note2,S4, Note 3 all sold in very high volumes. The latest S4 and N3 just didnt sell as many as Samsung had predicted, largely due to the fact that there are so many other great high end Android phones now. They are projected to make 9+ billion this quarter, a great quarter by any measure. Stocks take a hit when they dont make projections and Samsungs projections were unrealistic in todays market. They planned 100 million S4 to be sold which is just nuts. In summary, good profits, good quarter, bad projections.


RE: Samsung finally is starting to figure out ...
By Flunk on 1/3/2014 9:28:07 AM , Rating: 2
I think their casing quality is finally working against them. All the competition has improved at quality of their casings and Samsung is still using cheap glossy plastic. They could at least do what LG is doing and use better quality plastic.

It would cost very little and gain more repeat customers. Unlike now where the poor durability and feel of their current phones is losing them a lot of repeat customers.

I'm also not a fan of Touchwiz, but apparently a lot of people are. Processing and screen wise the S series has everything where it needs to be.


By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 9:36:29 AM , Rating: 1
Agreed. Samsungs high end phones do feel cheap and greasy. That is the primary reason I didn't get an S4. I went from S3 to LG G2. They do have good internals though. Once you get rid of the Sambloat they scream.


By JasonMick (blog) on 1/3/2014 10:02:22 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Agreed. Samsungs high end phones do feel cheap and greasy. That is the primary reason I didn't get an S4. I went from S3 to LG G2.
That's true. My comment below was largely targeted at older LG handsets. They really stepped up their game in terms of handfeel with the G2.

Hopefully Samsung tweaks the GS5 to follow in suit.


By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 10:39:20 AM , Rating: 2
"Hopefully Samsung tweaks the GS5 to follow in suit."

I am sure they will. It's all over the web that they will offer a metal body design this time, at least as an option or possibly a new model variant (Galaxy F). At this stage of the game its basically happening. Samsung caught too much crap for the cheap feel last round when everyone else upped their game, Sammy went cheap. I am sure they wont do that again.


By Reclaimer77 on 1/3/2014 5:24:26 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know why you keep repeating this as if it were fact. There's nothing "cheap" about high-end Samsung phones. Daily Tech and other biased blogs are the only place you see this opinion, not trusted review sites.

I guess you're going with the iTard mentality that anything not aluminum is 'cheap' and crappy, but plastics have a lot of advantages over metals which is why they're the most used material for casings.

There are no outstanding quality control issues with Samsung handsets resulting from "cheapness". If it's a preference thing, I understand that. But you are stating it as fact, not your opinion.


By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 6:40:22 PM , Rating: 2
"I don't know why you keep repeating this as if it were fact. There's nothing "cheap" about high-end Samsung phones. Daily Tech and other biased blogs are the only place you see this opinion, not trusted review sites."

Sorry Rec... It's not just me and its not just DT. The opinion that Samsung uses cheap plastic builds on even their high end phones is an extremely widespread one.

https://www.google.com/#q=samsung+phones+cheap+pla...

"I guess you're going with the iTard mentality that anything not aluminum is 'cheap' and crappy, but plastics have a lot of advantages over metals which is why they're the most used material for casings."


Not at all. HTC's plastics are good, like the HTC One. The LG G2 is good, and the Nexus 5 and 7 (2013) plastics are miles above the quality level of Samsungs high end tabs phones and they aren't even high end. Most Androids are made from plastic. Most are NOT cheap and greasy like Sammy, sorry, that is not just my opinion.


By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 6:40:53 PM , Rating: 2
edit / like the HTC One X


By Reclaimer77 on 1/4/2014 7:45:53 AM , Rating: 2
First off nobody sells more Android phones than Samsung. So the opinion that they are cheap, can't be that widespread.

Secondly, what are you basing this on? Are they cracking and breaking at higher rates? Do they do worst in drop tests? Are there outstanding quality control issues?

Just because you don't like the design aesthetics and the choice of materials, doesn't make them "cheap" and lesser quality.

quote:
The LG G2 is good, and the Nexus 5 and 7 (2013) plastics are miles above the quality level of Samsungs


None of those phones have the design challenge Samsung has with a removable back plate for the battery and SD slot.

Also you seem to be forgetting that most phones get wrapped in some sort of protective case or sleeve anyway. Rendering the "greasy feel" of the plastic irrelevant.

You just seem to be throwing out a lot of opinion without proof.

Have you even held a Note 3 in your hand? It's amazingly thin for such a large device, and there is NO chassis flex. The faux leather back feels awesome, the styling understated yet bold. It most certainly doesn't feel "greasy" or cheap.

quote:
https://www.google.com/#q=samsung+phones+cheap+pla...


This is your evidence? Umm okay...

https://www.google.com/search?q=lg+g2+cheap+plasti...

Here people are saying the LG G2 is slippery and cheap feeling. Go figure!?


By retrospooty on 1/4/2014 8:59:18 AM , Rating: 2
"Secondly, what are you basing this on? Are they cracking and breaking at higher rates? Do they do worst in drop tests? Are there outstanding quality control issues?"

We have talked about this before. Its not Cheap as in low quality and gets damaged, its just cheap as in cheap. It feels less well built, more "rickety" and yes it is an extremely widespread opinion that a hell of alot of people share.

"Have you even held a Note 3 in your hand? It's amazingly thin for such a large device, and there is NO chassis flex. The faux leather back feels awesome, the styling understated yet bold. It most certainly doesn't feel "greasy" or cheap."

Yes I have and yes it is better than previous high end models. Like I said in another post above to JM, I do believe Samsung has received the message. The next round is likely to have even better build quality. The G2 does share the same Slippery plastic which I hate, and is a compromise I made based on my needs and what was available on Verizon, but it is not rickety like previous Samsung models -definitely solid.


By JasonMick (blog) on 1/3/2014 10:00:42 AM , Rating: 2
quote:

I think their casing quality is finally working against them. All the competition has improved at quality of their casings and Samsung is still using cheap glossy plastic.
Definitely. It's not really that Samsung is using plastic, as both Nokia and Motorola have adopted tougher more scratch-resistant plastics that look more distinct via either patterning or colors.

The GS4 is very solid hardware wise, but its design is average. LG has the same problem. Both companies are very, very good at marketing, so it's saving them for now.

Touchwiz is arguably no worse than Sense UI (I like the multi-windowing features on the Note 3), and it's loads better than Motoblur. The problem is that under Google's lead Moto basically killed off Motoblur. The best move an Android OEM can make, arguably is to offer a near stock implementation of Android with firmware optimizations, then focus the rest of their effort in equal parts of hardware and design.


By jimbojimbo on 1/3/2014 10:46:45 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think their casing quality is finally working against them. All the competition has improved at quality of their casings
You're right. HTC is doing really well now.


By retrospooty on 1/3/2014 10:53:28 AM , Rating: 3
HTC's issues are not caused by the quality of the last few product rounds, which have been quite high and well received. HTC has been mismanaged from the ground up for many many years and their internal cost structure is out of control.

The point is (many people here think) that Samsung could have had alot better sales than they did if they did better quality hardware.


By Reclaimer77 on 1/4/2014 11:36:43 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
You're right. HTC is doing really well now.


HEHEHEH!!!! +6


RE: Samsung finally is starting to figure out ...
By Gio6518 on 1/3/2014 10:32:22 AM , Rating: 3
Figure what out being the number one in smart phone market... Just because Apple sells well in US (and it depends on the quarter) the US is less than 20% of the world's population to which it only holds about 30% of that... So in reality Apple only holds 12% of the market.... And in quarter 1 and 2 Samsung will be number one again... Also Windows phone market is rising slowly to which is chipping away at not androids market share but at apples


RE: Samsung finally is starting to figure out ...
By KPOM1 on 1/4/2014 9:54:03 PM , Rating: 2
Most Windows Phone sales have been low-end models in emerging markets like India, except for a few markets in Europe like Italy and Spain. Meanwhile, Apple had something like 76% market share in Japan in October and over 50% in the US.


By Gio6518 on 1/5/2014 11:00:28 AM , Rating: 2
Wow 50% REALLY....BZZZZZZ...wrong

http://www.gsmarena.com/eten%3C/counterpoint_nokia...

Sadly can't find Japan marketshare but doubt it's 76% maybe in your circle of influence

Maybe you can provide the well imagined number since I can only find last years where Android has 64% in Japan

http://thenextweb.com/asia/2012/08/22/android-lead...


Can you hire a copy editor?
By crimsonson on 1/3/14, Rating: -1
RE: Can you hire a copy editor?
By Monkey's Uncle on 1/3/2014 3:08:34 PM , Rating: 1
Agreed.

Jason, your title just makes no real sense. Can you please reword it?

Thankee much.


RE: Can you hire a copy editor?
By CZroe on 1/6/2014 2:32:29 PM , Rating: 2
In particular, this part:
"iPhones are Outselling Galaxy Note 3"

Uhh, duh? That's comparing sales of every phone one manufacturer makes to sales of a particular model that another manufacturer makes despite that model not even being their mainstream phone (that'd be the Galaxy S4). Why not just go ahead and compare them to the Korean-exclusive Galaxy Round?

Useless headline.


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