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Print 72 comment(s) - last by FreqNasty.. on Oct 18 at 9:38 AM

Windows XP is an elderly operating system, so why do we still rely so much on it?

Excitement is building around the launch of Windows 7. Microsoft's latest operating system was released to manufacturing back in August and will be available to consumers on October 22. Many eager Windows users are already enjoying their retail copies of Windows 7 courtesy of the Windows 7 Party Pack – in fact, some have decided to part ways with their Party Packs and list them for $200+ on eBay.

When it comes to Windows 7, there are quite a few features that stand out in the minds of users. The install takes up less space than Windows Vista, offers across the board performance increases (especially for netbooks), and includes numerous tweaks both to the user interface and beneath the skin. One feature that has received a lot of attention is XP Mode which is included with Business and Ultimate versions of Windows 7.

As its name implies, XP Mode allows users to run a fully licensed copy of Windows XP in a virtual environment within Windows 7. While having the ability to run a full copy of Windows XP Professional is no doubt a nice addition for regular consumers and businesses that still rely on Windows XP to run certain software or conduct business, is the trend to provide easy access to XP a help or hindrance to software development?

Windows XP was released late in 2001; we are now late in 2009 and fast approaching 2010. Windows XP is an eight-year-old operating system, which is quite ancient in terms of modern operating systems. Since that time, Windows Vista was released (October 2006 for businesses, January 2007 for consumers) and now were are tiptoeing towards the release of Windows 7.

Is is that consumers and businesses are just so set in their ways with using older, incompatible software? After all, upgrading to newer software that is compatible with Windows Vista/7 could be quite expensive for corporations on top of the cost of upgrading to Windows 7 (or buying new computer systems with Windows 7 already installed). Or are the software vendors that provided these older software programs just not interested in making newer versions compatible with Windows Vista and Windows 7?

In Microsoft's case, it's of little concern, because anyone who buys a copy of Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate for XP mode has ultimately bought a new Windows license. But the question remains, why hang on to ties to the past?

Tell us your thoughts. If you plan on using XP Mode in Windows 7, what software do you plan to run in the virtual environment? Why are you using that software? Is there an updated version that is compatible with Vista/Windows 7, but you're comfortable using the older version? You have our ears!



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browsing questionable websites
By kattanna on 10/12/2009 3:29:58 PM , Rating: 2
one thing i have used it for is to visit questionable websites. doing it that way if the site tries to infect the machine, i can simply delete the XP VM and re create it without issue.




RE: browsing questionable websites
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 10/12/2009 3:55:35 PM , Rating: 3
I would point you towards this instead.
http://www.sandboxie.com/


RE: browsing questionable websites
By jonmcc33 on 10/12/2009 4:27:37 PM , Rating: 2
Or even VirtualBox.
http://www.virtualbox.org/

To run Virtual XP Mode you need Windows 7 Pro or Ultimate. Both versions are much more expensive than Windows 7 Home Premium. VirtualBox is free! Save the money and just use VirtualBox!


RE: browsing questionable websites
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 10/12/2009 4:35:31 PM , Rating: 4
VirtualPC is also free. XP Mode actually includes a pre-configured XP VM that is legally licensed by Microsoft. XP Mode is little more than the VM though, you still need to load the VirtualPC software on Windows 7 to take advantage of it.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By adiposity on 10/12/2009 5:28:49 PM , Rating: 5
Yes, but it will put icons in your Windows 7 notification area ("tray"), and the windows will show up on your Windows 7 taskbar, and you don't have to look at the Windows XP VM in a window, and the icons will be installed into your Windows 7 start menu, and you can print directly to your Windows 7 printers, and have access to your Windows 7 shares...

Don't get me wrong. It sucks to have to use it. But once set up, it's much closer to native apps than a generic VM (vmware, virtual pc, etc.).

-Dan


RE: browsing questionable websites
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/12/2009 5:31:46 PM , Rating: 2
I love VirtualBox -- also helps that it's free :) I use it to run Windows 7 RC1 on my MacBook Pro so that I can have terminal access to my Windows Home Server.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By jonmcc33 on 10/13/2009 10:46:35 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, it is quite a nice multiplatform VM application. Works on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. I have been using it since before Sun acquired it but Sun has just improved it tenfold.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By kattanna on 10/12/2009 5:33:16 PM , Rating: 1
quote:
To run Virtual XP Mode you need Windows 7 Pro or Ultimate. Both versions are much more expensive than Windows 7 Home Premium. VirtualBox is free! Save the money and just use VirtualBox!


as a technet member, it costs me the same to use whatever version, so of course ultimate.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By jonmcc33 on 10/13/2009 10:49:43 AM , Rating: 1
I don't think you were saving any money when you became a TechNet member ($349 per year).


RE: browsing questionable websites
By MatthiasF on 10/13/2009 12:59:53 PM , Rating: 2
Windows Ultimate alone is $220. Add on Office, OneNote, etc., and the value adds up beyond $349.

This all assumes you actually want legitimate licenses. If you're a faux robin-hood that steals his software, paying anything is too much obviously.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By jonmcc33 on 10/15/2009 8:44:36 AM , Rating: 2
Actually, you can get Windows 7 Ultimate for $179 @ NewEgg right now.

OpenOffice.org is completely free and offers word processing, spreadsheet and presentation capability. Never seen many home users using OneNote.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By Proxes on 10/13/2009 1:55:27 PM , Rating: 3
With a coupon code you can get the price down to around $281 including tax. Ten Windows 7 Ultimate keys that have 10 installs each on them plus all the other stuff for $281? Yes please.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 10/12/2009 6:28:32 PM , Rating: 2
Would inPrivate, Private Mode, inCognito, or the other so-called browser "porn modes" not be good enough for browsing "suspicious sites"?


RE: browsing questionable websites
By jonmcc33 on 10/13/2009 10:51:09 AM , Rating: 2
Those prevent your tracks from being traced (cookies, history, etc) but they do not protect against virus or malware.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By feraltoad on 10/13/2009 8:50:09 PM , Rating: 2
Sandboxie Installer 3.40 (Windows 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, 7; 32-bit only)

Unfortunately, Sandboxie is 32-bit only. BTW attempting to run it in compatibility mode will get you a blue screen on Win7 64, I tried.

I guess you could run Sandboxie in Windows XP mode?


RE: browsing questionable websites
By Spivonious on 10/13/2009 1:18:31 PM , Rating: 2
Geez, just use IE8. It runs in "Protected Mode" by default, which runs the browser in a sandbox. Better yet, start the browser in porn mode and you won't have any problems. Unless you click on Yes in the UAC prompt that is.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By Staples on 10/14/2009 1:05:06 AM , Rating: 2
Here at Anandtech and the echo chambers of the tech community, we have been brainwashed to believe that using IE will kill your family.

Anyway, I find it ridiculous. I use it all the time and in fact I am using it to type this message. Wow, and I never get viruses either. Imagine that.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By MrPoletski on 10/14/2009 6:01:55 AM , Rating: 2
I hear IE raped and murdered a teenage girl in 1990.


RE: browsing questionable websites
By jonmcc33 on 10/15/2009 8:46:15 AM , Rating: 1
-1 if I could give it. Not an appropriate nor funny comment.


By MrPoletski on 10/15/2009 10:37:46 AM , Rating: 3
get a life.


Old games :)
By HaZaRd2K6 on 10/12/2009 12:41:36 PM , Rating: 4
Basically just gonna be using it to fire up some old games that didn't ever like Vista or Windows 7. I'm talking like mid-to-late '90s games here: Age of Empires, Deus Ex and the like.




RE: Old games :)
By Smilin on 10/12/2009 4:35:07 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah I bought this @#$ Atari classic pack on steam and didn't read the specs.

It requires DX7 and won't even launch on Vista.


RE: Old games :)
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 10/12/2009 4:36:48 PM , Rating: 2
DirectX is likely not going to work even in XP Mode. It's still a Vitual Machine for all intents and puroses, and still subject to lack of access to 3D Acceleration hardware.


RE: Old games :)
By jonmcc33 on 10/13/2009 10:54:04 AM , Rating: 2
Some older games will easily render in software mode (Unreal Tournament).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_rendering


RE: Old games :)
By Calin on 10/13/2009 2:36:28 PM , Rating: 2
VirtualBox can use 3D acceleration (either DirectX or OpenGL in Windows, OpenGL only in Linux). Tried it, and it works quite nice.


RE: Old games :)
By mcnabney on 10/13/2009 4:16:51 PM , Rating: 2
Virtualbox WILL run DirectX games.

XP Mode in Pro and Ultimate WILL NOT run DirectX games.

All the people who bought beyond Premium just for XP Mode to play games just wasted their money.


RE: Old games :)
By Alexstarfire on 10/13/2009 8:43:07 PM , Rating: 2
Unless they like being limited to 8GB of RAM I'd say it's not really wasted. I got Pro just for that reason alone. Of course when you can get Home Premium and Pro for the same price it's obvious which one you're going to pick. :P


RE: Old games :)
By Smilin on 10/13/2009 4:43:07 PM , Rating: 2
Understood. I don't actually need the HW acceleration for these old games. Software will be just fine.

Hopefully this will do the trick otherwise I'm just out my money. I am NOT going back to Win XP. That crusty thing feels like Win 95 to me.


RE: Old games :)
By AlexWade on 10/12/2009 6:12:49 PM , Rating: 2
Like you, I'm going to use XP Mode to run my old 16-bit games. 16-bit support is gone in 64-bit Windows. So, I'm using my 64-bit OS to emulate a 32-bit OS to run a 16-bit game.

Transport Tycoon here I come! The patched version I have requires a 16-bit program launcher which enables advanced features in the game.


RE: Old games :)
By MrPoletski on 10/14/2009 6:03:00 AM , Rating: 2
You would have thought age of empires would work on the new windows OS's no problem.

It is, after all, a Microsoft game...


My wife needs WinXP
By ricleo2 on 10/12/2009 12:58:22 PM , Rating: 2
My wife works from home and she needs to log in to work with XP. Vista or anything else simply does not work. Hopefully this XP emulation will work for her so I can use 7 for myself.




RE: My wife needs WinXP
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 10/12/2009 3:54:22 PM , Rating: 2
That is strange she can't log in from home on anything other than XP. Is it simply that her company doesn't support anything higher than IE 6?


RE: My wife needs WinXP
By jonmcc33 on 10/12/2009 4:24:28 PM , Rating: 2
I think it's more related to VPN client support? Cisco has had a working version of their VPN client for Vista/7 for a while now. Not sure about other VPN clients though.


RE: My wife needs WinXP
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 10/12/2009 4:27:52 PM , Rating: 1
Most vendors have Vista/Windows7 support. It could be that se simply needs 32-bit and in that case the virtual driver for the NIC might not work under a 64-bit OS.


RE: My wife needs WinXP
By bhieb on 10/13/2009 1:33:12 PM , Rating: 2
Could be that she has 64bit 7 or vista, as cisco does not have a 64bit client for those (well not one that will connect to a pix now it is something like Anyconnect and requires a different appliance). Running xp 32 bit would solve that.


RE: My wife needs WinXP
By Nehemoth on 10/13/2009 2:36:07 PM , Rating: 2
This is my case, I'm using Windows XP Mode for Cisco VPN Client, sadly as I have 8GB of RAM 32bits its not an option.

Exist a VPN Cclient which I can use on 64bits?


RE: My wife needs WinXP
By ricleo2 on 10/13/2009 1:24:25 PM , Rating: 2
All I can tell you is she gets an error message that the operating system (Vista64) is not supported.


RE: My wife needs WinXP
By Matt W on 10/12/2009 8:29:44 PM , Rating: 3
As I also stated in a separate post... I also MUST log into my work/corporate environment from home ONLY on an XP machine. Also, IE 6 is the least 'buggy' browser to use when doing so (IE 7 and 8 work, but with much headache and poor user experience).

Believe me, I am very tech savvy and have tried to circumvent this ridiculous requirement, but you simply cannot remotely log in with anything other than XP. I have tried and tried and tried... no go. So the XP emulation (with the browser NOT upgraded and still on IE 6) works absolutely flawlessly.


Industry
By tjr508 on 10/12/2009 6:48:16 PM , Rating: 4
I work with industrial equipment regularly. The fact is that somewhere in the mid-90s it became worth-while to integrate commands and controls to a PC-like environment. This was not due to a large jump in computing power at the time, but it was rather due to a large jump in availability of many solutions along with a trend. Now that 10-15 years has been spent fine-tuning systems that are now rock-solid, it would be silly to essentially start from scratch and re-do everything while realizing near-zero benefit.

I know of a couple fortune 500 companies whose most profitable equipment runs primarily on 16 bit code. The reasoning is that it works well.

Vista/Win7 are in unique positions in that they the first major OSs to occur after the large industrial trend to move controls over PC atmospheres while not supporting many older instruction sets.




RE: Industry
By The0ne on 10/12/2009 7:39:13 PM , Rating: 2
Trust me "industrial" environments and manufacturing environments don't change much. Change is complicated and costly so stick with what has been working til the company is brave enough to spend the money for the change :D


RE: Industry
By Nik00117 on 10/13/2009 5:37:17 AM , Rating: 1
I worked in a Cash Cage, our western union machine was Windows 95. Western Union offered to switch us to Vista we declined on the basis we don't need it DOS works just fine.

It's not fancy, it's a black and white screen, however it's fast, works, and simple to use.


RE: Industry
By NaughtyGeek on 10/13/2009 1:04:04 PM , Rating: 3
I believe you've touched on one of the biggest issues with modern OS upgrades. In my environment, it's less about the code the machines are running and more about the software required to interface with said equipment for troubleshooting and system changes. As a topper to that, our business software just finally became XP compatible about a year ago.


I used Windows Xp
By Nik00117 on 10/13/2009 5:33:17 AM , Rating: 3
I still use Windows XP because it's so solid.

My work has switched over to Vista and I'm finding far to many problems.

I most likely won't make the jump to Windows 7 for my personal use until January 2011, which will put me using Windows XP for 10 YEARS!.

However it's rock solid, I generally play CS:S I play CS:S for hours on end when I get the chance I run at 150 FPS high settings, computer never over heats etc. It's like its running word and not a FPS.

Vista? Half the frame rate (which still isn't bad) but for the investment of $400 I don't see benefit. I however intend to switch to Windows 7 in due time.




RE: I used Windows Xp
By jonmcc33 on 10/13/2009 11:00:07 AM , Rating: 2
1. A Windows Vista/7 OEM license can be as low as $100. Not sure where you pull the $400 out of? Your rear end maybe?
2. Framerates will NOT be half as much in Windows Vista/7. Recent benchmarks have shown that performance will actually be BETTER on Windows Vista/7 than Windows XP. Drivers have matured quite a bit.
3. There is little difference when gaming between 70FPS and 150FPS. It's when you dip into the 30FPS range that things can become unacceptable.


RE: I used Windows Xp
By Alexstarfire on 10/13/2009 8:57:21 PM , Rating: 2
I would agree with #1 but perhaps him switching to Vista is going to require more than just the OS itself. I don't know what he has so I can't say.

#2, better? Doubtful. Equal? Far more likely. Though with CS it's always been weird. I'm sure he can probably run CS:S faster than CS despite CS being older and needing far less resources/power to run. He could very well be right, but I have no idea and it really doesn't matter to me. He states that FPS isn't an issue anyway.


RE: I used Windows Xp
By jonmcc33 on 10/15/2009 8:48:48 AM , Rating: 2
AnandTech did a Windows 7 RC preview and benchmarks showed that it was in fact small percentage points faster than Windows XP.

Don't kill the messenger. They did the benchmarking.


Software Development
By jcrane2 on 10/12/2009 1:21:31 PM , Rating: 2
I am software developer writing client apps that run on Windows 2000, XP, Vista, and Windows 7. For tools I use Microsoft Visual Studio 6.0 and Visual Studio 2005. VS 6.0 is not compatible with Vista or Windows 7, so I need an XP environment to compile on. Why Visual Studio 6.0? Because my apps need to be small and light-weight because they are downloaded over the Internet, and most of my users don't have .NET installed.

I also use Microsoft Vistual PC running under Windows 7 for testing on these various platforms.




RE: Software Development
By TomZ on 10/12/2009 4:20:38 PM , Rating: 2
FYI, you don't need to be stuck with Visual Studio 6.0 just because you don't want to do .NET. Any of the newer versions can generate native executables just fine. Use of .NET is completely optional even for VS2010.


RE: Software Development
By wetwareinterface on 10/13/2009 5:15:44 PM , Rating: 2
only in certain languages like c, c++, or c#.
VB is only standalone in 6 or earlier.

not to mention there's a ton of VB 6 code still floating out there needing support and the language changed with the move to .net.


Here's why XP rules:
By JuPO5b4REqAYbSPUlMcP on 10/13/2009 1:34:12 PM , Rating: 2
(For businesses)

1. Most Line of Business apps will not abandon XP because so many companies run it.
2. Alternatively, it takes time to approve new Operating systems, service packs for LOB apps. Vista was just recently approved by 3 of our application makers. Windows 7 won't be supported for at least 2 years, and certainly not XP mode in Windows 7. The vendor needs to know what the environment is, VM or not. Many vendors simply will not support a VM'd environment because it's even harder to test in that scenario.

3. An OS promary role is to run apps. XP does this better than Vista and 7, bar none. XP runs all the apps of the past ~10 years without difficulty. As much as people would like Vista and 7 to work without hassle, it just doesn't. UAC breaks many apps auto-update routines.

Not saying Windows 7 won't eventually replace XP, I'm just saying nobody in business world will be rushing out to replace XP until their apps are 7 approved, which is unlikely except for the smallest of businesses.

(for consumers)

Have at it. Almost all your apps and hardware should work fine. The 4 MP sony camera I bought in 2000 that takes great pictures still hasn't worked since Vista, and Sony plans no device drivers to get it to work. The only workaround is an annoying memory card reader.




RE: Here's why XP rules:
By Radnor on 10/14/2009 7:59:29 AM , Rating: 2
For bussiness.

1-Most VMs work flawlessly even with older Win2K Apps. Bussiness sometiems just ned to grow a brain, and let CIOs think for themselfs, or however is responsible.

2- If people just test, you would be surprised what runs without a hitch on Vista/7 64 Bits.

3- Msconfig-> disable UAC -> Profit !!

4- Blame Sony. They always do that.

An angry user stuck at IE6/Win2K. This CPU already has EMT64 bits FFS !!!


RE: Here's why XP rules:
By Cypherdude1 on 10/15/2009 6:23:01 PM , Rating: 2
I am currently using XP Pro on this machine. It works fine and is very stable. Because the CPU is an older single core AMD 1400 MHz T-Bird (+1 GB RAM), this is the end of the upgrade path for this machine. Even if the CPU was faster, I still would not upgrade to Vista or 7. Installing a new O/S and all its apps is very time consuming and troublesome. In addition, purchasing Win7, 2 new office suites, Acrobat 9 Pro, plus extra utilities is very costly, at least $700.

Furthermore, there are many software titles and older hardware devices which do not work on Windows Vista or 7. I may even transfer this XP Pro license to a new 4 core machine. Because XP Pro is not well designed for multi-core CPU's, I may use a third party utility to set the CPU affinity. Microsoft never created any utilities or shortcuts for XP Pro which allow a user to automatically choose a particular core for a particular application. This must done either manually in Task Manager or by a third party utility. Here is one utility which allows a user to set CPU affinity:
http://prioritymaster.com/

BTW, if your manufacturer did not write a device driver for Windows 7, it will not work even in XP virtual mode.


Remote access to corporate environment.
By Matt W on 10/12/2009 2:04:19 PM , Rating: 3
I use Virtual XP to remote connect into my corporate environment from my home PC since I must be using Windows XP and IE 6. (Unbelievable I agree).

So I have been using the Windows 7 RC since the day it was available, and have been using Virtual XP to log in to my work environment. It has been absolutely flawless. No issues whatsoever.

One trick... install Virtual XP, install virus protection, install all Windows updates EXCEPT do not upgrade the browser... leave the browser on IE 6. Then install Citrix. You'll be good to go.

If you log in to work remotely, I highly recommend spending the extra money to buy the Professional version of Windows 7... just for the Virtual XP feature alone.




By segerstein on 10/13/2009 8:51:21 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I use Virtual XP to remote connect into my corporate environment from my home PC since I must be using Windows XP and IE 6. (Unbelievable I agree).

If you are using a website to access your corporate environment (and using no additional IE ActiveX plug-ins), then it's only a browser user agent issue.

Try add-on for Firefox named User Agent Switcher ;-)

Before that check what your actual user agent in IE is. Google a bit for "show my user agent".


Application Compatability
By 3minence on 10/14/2009 10:29:12 AM , Rating: 2
I use a GIS app that requires WinXP. I tried various compatibility mode tweaks in Vista and Win7RC to no avail. So I have a separate hard drive with XP that I boot up on when I need to use it. When Win7 comes out I will buy Win7 Pro (I'm a student so I can get it for $29) and use XP mode for the app.

Yes, I could pay to upgrade to a newer version of the app for a few hundred dollars, but why? The old version does everything I need it to. I have more important things to spend my money on. This is a good compromise.




RE: Application Compatability
By Eyebag on 10/14/2009 1:45:31 PM , Rating: 2
I'm using an autodesk 3ds max and it cost a lot of money for about $3,495 i will not spend for a new Operating System against a $3thousand software


Webcam and Scanner access
By dyeager on 10/12/2009 2:45:13 PM , Rating: 2
Have a higher end logitech webcam and a higher end scanner (USB/SCSI) that do not have vista or windows 7 drivers.

Have another webcam system, a Cisco 4500 series IP camera with full 1080p, that uses active x and requires Windows XP on the client even though it was introduced last year!?! Hopefully this camera does get updated so XP can be dropped.




MyHD HDTV Tuner
By jnmfox on 10/13/2009 12:48:48 PM , Rating: 2
I have a MyHD card in the family PC for our DVR, the manufacturer has already stated they won't support future versions of Windows. So I would use XP mode for that but I will probably just stick with XP on the family machine and put Win 7 on my PC.




By StraightCashHomey on 10/13/2009 12:53:17 PM , Rating: 2
Is basically what it boils down to in my experience. Our engineering department probably has an average age of 60, so they just don't want to learn anything new. Most of their applications were built for Windows 95, 98, and 2000 - and our IT director has to pull teeth to get them to adapt to anything new.

It may also be a reflection on most companies' neglect for proper IT support. I'm sure most companies in this situation may not be able to afford a full-time IT crew, but any company that invests a respectable amount of money into IT should have the proper consulting needed to show the ROI on newer software that actually has support available for it.

As soon as my generation (27 years of age, give or take) starts becoming the "old" crowd, this probably will not be talked about.




VPN Access
By NaughtyGeek on 10/13/2009 1:07:51 PM , Rating: 2
As it stands today, Sonicwall's VPN client doesn't even officially support Vista let alone Win7. VPN access will be a large use for XP mode I believe.




at the office
By Randomblame on 10/13/2009 2:48:53 PM , Rating: 2
we have computer illiterates, who depend on computers to make their living - weird eh? They use pagemaker and refuse to learn indesign. Pagemaker does not work on vista or windows 7 so I installed xp mode and viola they are actually getting work done.




By lecanard on 10/13/2009 4:39:09 PM , Rating: 2
There is an accelerometer dock we use in my lab that does not detect the device unless I am in XP mode.




By wetwareinterface on 10/13/2009 5:28:04 PM , Rating: 2
Sorry no go.
Win XP mode is strictly about running software. It uses emulated, and frankly bottom of the barrel level, hardware. It does not use the actual hardware in your machine. By this I mean if you stick in a MyHD card or a logitech webcam or a printer without Win 7 drivers etc... it will not work.

Win XP mode can use a printer but only if it's got a driver in Win 7/Vista first, then it gets passed to the virtual PC, which runs Win XP, as a networked printer.
Scanners forget it.
Tuner cards, forget it.
3d cards, forget it all you get is an emulated S3 Virge.
Sound card, forget it all you get is an emulated soundblaster 16.

etc...




Serrato Scratch
By SLEEPER5555 on 10/13/2009 5:34:28 PM , Rating: 2
Seratto Scratch prefers XP over vista (they highly recomend it) and though it does work in 7 i sometimes have to restart it a few times to get it to see the rane mixer.




16-bit apps
By bertomatic on 10/13/2009 5:48:44 PM , Rating: 2
i expect the 1st few users over here to go from XP to 7 will need it for a couple pf 16-bit apps. that mgmt refuses to invest in replacing/upgrading. I has testes out "ok". but not great. this will probably prevent us from doing a clean-sweep across the org to get 7 for everyone.




By Mk4ever on 10/14/2009 12:23:27 AM , Rating: 2
To be completely honest, my first thought when I heard about XP Mode was: why would anyone need XP Mode if we can adjust compatibility settings for specific applications, especially that every program I tried worked with specific compatibility changes?

Finally my luck ran out last week, and I found that XP Mode is a very useful solution.

I am using XP Mode for J Builder 2005, and I'm using this particular version as our university course, as well as our course instructors, mandate. Adjusting every single compatibility setting under Vista or 7 didn't work. The only solution was using XP Mode.

It is unfortunate though, as I was considering getting a discounted Home Premium license with Win7 from my university. Now I have to consider at least the Professional edition to get XP Mode. I don't think my university provides Professional for students, thus the price will be considerably higher to me.




By The1nOnlyAL on 10/14/2009 8:21:19 AM , Rating: 2
I work in IT and have had huge headaches helping my wife login to her company's gateway from a home PC. Unfortunately, they don't give anyone laptops, so you are forced to use their online gateway. The security checking tool they use is in bad need of an update. It starts a PC scan when you first hit the URL, which Vista flags as a major security risk, and ultimately it crashes the whole IE session.

Ironically, I was already a step ahead of Microsoft on this. I tried multiple things, even sending her IT Department a thread from a newsgroup telling them how to fix the problem - to no avail of course. So finally, on her last business trip, I installed VMware Server and created a VM for her which runs Windows XP.

I definitely welcome what Microsoft is doing here. Especially when you need to work with software from large companies that are slow to move, or do alot of in house development which can't be changed quickly. In this case, no one wanted to do a system upgrade at work just because one user was running Vista at home, so this new feature in Windows 7 could be "make or break" in certain situations.




It's all about IE6
By JS on 10/14/2009 8:46:47 AM , Rating: 2
I am a web designer and I use XP Mode on Windows 7 to be able to test properly in IE6, that I unfortunately still must support.

IE Collection (that lets you install all versions of IE standalone) is buggy and even more so on Windows 7. XP Mode makes for a pretty foolproof way of testing for IE6, although it is slow to load and refresh pages, don't know why.




For 16-bit apps.
By thecoolnessrune on 10/14/2009 10:26:56 AM , Rating: 2
I'm in an Assembly class and use XP Mode to run the MASM compiler which won't work on a 64-bit OS due to no 16-bit system.

I also use it to run my virtual TI-89 Titanium calculator and also to connect my real TI-89 Titanium, both simply because lazy TI chose not to support anything beyond XP in their software.




printing!
By kevinkreiser on 10/14/2009 4:55:51 PM , Rating: 2
i have a crappy lexmark printer. it doesn't have vista/win7 drivers. in xp mode i can install the xp print drivers and print whatever i want. seems ridiculous that i have to use a vm just to print, but at the same time, its nice to have!




VMware wont work
By zinc99 on 10/14/2009 8:54:40 PM , Rating: 2
VMware 4.0 console wont work in windows 7. VMware just says its not out so we dont care. But it works great in XP mode. Its the only thing I have needed to put in there. It would be a real pain the ass to mess with my 30 VM servers if I could not get to them from my laptop.




Thinapp
By FreqNasty on 10/18/2009 9:38:56 AM , Rating: 2
Portable apps made with Thinapp will not work on Windows 7 so XP mode should come in useful for those. I don't think Thinapp will be Windows 7 compatible until December or January next year.




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