backtop


Print 49 comment(s) - last by michael2k.. on Apr 30 at 6:13 PM

One in every four phones (of any kind) sold is now a Samsung; company earns $4.45B USD

When it comes to smartphones it's a tale of haves and have-nots.  Last year Apple, Inc. (AAPL) and Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KS:005930) (the top Android phonemaker) accounted for 90 percent of the sales of high-end handsets.  The rest of the pack was left behind, trying to peddle lower-end hardware (often lower margin), or compete for the remaining 10 percent in the high-end, high-margin market.

I. Samsung Outsells Apple in Smartphones

For companies like HTC Corp. (TPE:2498) who have watched in dismay as Apple and Samsung gobbled up their market share, Q1 2012 sadly brought little relief.  Just a week after Apple posted a record profit of $11.6B USD on a $39.2B USD revenue, Samsung responded [PDF], posting a record $4.45B USD (5.05T Won) in profit on a $39.88B USD (45.27T Won) revenue.

In Q1 Samsung was on top of the smartphone industry, beating out Apple in unit sales.

Samsung girls
Samsung's attractive models beat out Apple in unit sales. [Image Source: Shootspeak]

Of its operating profit ($5.15B USD; 5.85T Won), $3.76B USD (4.27T Won) -- roughly three quarters -- came from the company's mobile (phones, tablets) unit.  Reuters is citing experts as stating that Samsung sold 44m smartphones for the quarter.  That would put it ahead of its more-profitable rival Apple on a sales basis.  Apple sold 35.1m iPhones for the quarter, placing it roughly 25 percent behind Samsung in sales.

The numbers are particularly impressive, given that a year ago Apple was estimated to outsell Samsung nearly 2-to-1 [source].  The Samsung triumph came to incredible growth.  While Apple managed to double its smartphone sales on a year-to-year basis, Samsung more than quadrupled its sales -- a superhuman feat.

Samsung building
Samsung more than quadrupled its phone sales on a yearly basis. [Image Source: Flickr]

The strong performance by Samsung's rival wasn't altogether bad for the electronics company either.  It raked in a profit of $669.6M USD (0.76T) Won -- or half of the remaining non-smartphone profit -- from its semiconductor division.  With DRAM prices plunging to new lows, much of that profit likely comes from Samsung's lucrative contract to produce Apple's CPUs.  Nearly every iPhone and iPad sold today carries a CPU produced at Samsung's Texas plant, which is just miles away from one of Apple's largest U.S. call centers.

Despite a legal war and an ocean between them, the pair remains closely tied even as they compete fiercely on the smartphone market.

II. Samsung Takes the Crown of the World's Top Phonemaker

Samsung reached an important milestone in the first quarter, with total phone sales (including feature phones) of over 90 million units (93.5 million by Strategy Analytics’ accounting).  With Nokia Oyj.'s (HEX:NOK1V) sales plunging to 82.7m units (11.9m smartphones; including feature phones).  Samsung is outselling Nokia's smartphones nearly 4-to-1, but it's also punishing the Finnish phonemaker in the budget market.

Nokia has tried to revitalize its budget phone lineup adding smartphone-like features, as seen in its new Asha models.  But the carrier features a big problem in that feature phones -- a market it long dominated -- are a dying market.

In Q1 2011 Nokia sold an estimated 84.3m feature phones.  In Q1 2012 it sold approximately 70.8m feature phones, a drop of over 16 percent.  By contrast Samsung sold an estimated 58.1m features phones in Q1 2011, and only 49.5m in Q1 2012 -- a drop of roughly 15 percent.

Aragorn king
It's official: Samsung is king of the phone market. [Image: Peter Jackson/Newline Cinema]

In other words, Nokia and Samsung's feature phone sales are vanishing at almost the same rate, but the key difference is that Samsung more than quadrupled its smartphone sales, while Nokia saw its smartphone sales actually fall to half their Q1 2011 values.

In other words, smartphones are what won Samsung the lead, or on the flip side of the coin, what lost Nokia the lead.  

The key factor that's dragged Nokia down is the fact that it's allowed Symbian to linger around far too long.  The majority of Nokia's top 20 smartphones still run Symbian.  And yet the company has announced that the platform will be dead soon.  Consumers don't want to buy a product that's on death row, so many are opting simply to abandon Nokia.  By contrast, Samsung offers consumers one consistent option -- Android -- with the promise of long-term support.

With Samsung's highly anticipated Galaxy S3 about to drop, Samsung looks unlikely to fade in smartphone sales.

Sources: Samsung [PDF], Supply Analytics



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Hindsight will be 20/20
By Dorkyman on 4/27/2012 5:10:44 PM , Rating: 2
A few years from now, folks who lost a fortune on Apple stock will be nursing their beers, saying to anyone who will listen "It is so obvious now--why didn't I see the signs that Apple stock was a bubble???"




RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By messele on 4/28/12, Rating: 0
RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By euler007 on 4/28/2012 7:23:24 PM , Rating: 4
Classic post. The article is about Samsung passing Nokia to take the world crown for mobile phone sales and you post that 95% of their phones are crap.

Clearly mr. market doesn't agree with you. Shouldn't you be lining up for the iphone 5 or something?


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By messele on 4/29/2012 5:04:55 AM , Rating: 1
95% of all phones are crap, this is the shift in market share that Samsung have grabbed. It's not the premium end of scale as Nokia did not have a premium end of the scale worth anything to take.

Mr. Market determines that most sales cater for the cheap end of the scale, that is kids and non-geeks who are simply not prepared to spend money on features that they either do not need or cannot afford.

Show me that I'm wrong with some meaningful figures.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By matty123 on 4/29/2012 8:29:27 AM , Rating: 3
How about actually reading the article???

quote:
In Q1 Samsung was on top of the smartphone industry, beating out Apple in unit sales.


or

quote:
Last year Apple, Inc. (AAPL) and Samsung Electronics Comp., Ltd. (KS:005930) (the top Android phonemaker) accounted for 90 percent of the sales of high-end handsets.


or

quote:
The Samsung triumph came to incredible growth. While Apple managed to double its smartphone sales on a year-to-year basis, Samsung more than quadrupled its sales -- a superhuman feat.


or

quote:
Samsung is outselling Nokia's smartphones nearly 4-to-1, but it's also punishing the Finnish phonemaker in the budget market.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By messele on 4/29/2012 2:36:12 PM , Rating: 1
I read the article, I put it back to you, how about comprehending the article? Samsung's earnings report does not differentiate between handset types, indeed it lumps in all mobile products, including tablets. The article is ambiguous at best and easy to quote out of context as you have demonstrated.

My Turn...

quote:
One in every four phones (of any kind) sold is now a Samsung; company earns $4.45B USD


quote:
Of its operating profit ($5.15B USD; 5.85T Won), $3.76B USD (4.27T Won) -- roughly three quarters -- came from the company's mobile (phones, tablets) unit.


quote:
Samsung reached an important milestone in the first quarter, with total phone sales (including feature phones) of over 90 million units (93.5 million by Strategy Analytics’ accounting). With Nokia Oyj.'s (HEX:NOK1V) sales plunging to 82.7m units (11.9m smartphones; including feature phones).


Everything that mentions smartphone sales is an analyst estimate and these are not to be taken as gospel and in any case I would put it to you that well over half of all smartphones are also junk since they are not supported by their manufacturers beyond the first year.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By matty123 on 4/29/2012 4:17:39 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
Everything that mentions smartphone sales is an analyst estimate and these are not to be taken as gospel and in any case I would put it to you that well over half of all smartphones are also junk since they are not supported by their manufacturers beyond the first year.


But that's because Samsung themselves don't release sales figures for their specific product lines only for their mobile division as a whole... Analysts have looked at the data and come to the conclusion that Samsung have sold 44 million smartphones, what do you suggest as an alternative? that we all listen to you? Instead of a firm of analysts who have probably poured over every scrap of available data and reached this conclusion... This is the best estimate of the amount of smartphones sold certainly better than a unsubstantiated blanket denial issued by one individual and I have yet too see any analyst firms disputing the numbers.

The second part of your post is pure drivel, it's absurd to say smartphones arn't smartphones purely because the manufacturer isn't offering support for them anymore, this in no way changes what they are or how many of them were sold.

Apple still includes the iphone 3gs in it's quarterly smartphone sales {I Believe} despite the fact that some of nokia's new feature phones have better specifications, it would be just as absurd to say apple shouldn't include those sales but the fact remains that the iphone 3gs is still a smartphone despite certain people's insistence otherwise in the same way you can't just say a smartphone isn't a smartphone anymore and make it so.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By messele on 4/29/12, Rating: 0
RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By matty123 on 4/29/2012 7:22:15 PM , Rating: 2
Fair enough seems I misunderstood what you meant about smartphones.

But considering that Samsung profits are up 82% from last quarter mainly on the sales of phones I will maintain that this article is correct.

Here are some quotes from Smasung's actual press release {In which I doubt they lied}.

quote:
Samsung’s strong performance in the quarter was driven mainly by the IT & Mobile Communications (IM) segment, which is comprised of four businesses, Mobile Communications, Telecommunication Systems, IT Solutions and Digital Imaging. In particular, solid growth in the Mobile Communications business, with brisk sales of flagship GALAXY Note and GALAXY S II devices contributed to the company’s profitability.


quote:
Profits Propped Up by Strong Sales of Smart Devices

The IT & Mobile Communications division – including Mobile Communications, Telecommunication Systems, IT Solutions and Digital Imaging – registered quarterly operating profits of 4.27 trillion won for the first period. Revenue reached 23.22 trillion won, and the mobile unit accounted for 18.90 trillion won, up 86 percent year-on-year. Growth in shipments of Samsung’s flagship GALAXY Note and GALAXY S II and other premium mobile devices yielded high returns, with significant growth in China, Central and South America, the Middle East and Africa.


Also Samsung have given us at least some info on their premium smartphones...

quote:
The Samsung Galaxy S II is one of the most successful high-end Android handsets out there and now it’s got the numbers to prove it. Samsung says the Galaxy S II has sold 20 million units in the 10 months since its release in April 2011.


Link: http://www.phonearena.com/news/Samsung-Galaxy-S-II...

quote:
Samsung announced on Wednesday that it has shipped more than 5 million units of its part-phone, part-tablet device, the Galaxy Note.


Link: http://mashable.com/2012/03/28/samsung-5-million-g...

At any rate I only replied because you said...

quote:
...because Samsung's model of selling 95% crap phones and 5% excellent phones is the way to go and Apple got it horribly wrong?


Looking at the data I would say that is clearly not the case {or at least in my opinion and seemingly the majority of tech sites reporting on samsung's success} through I will grant you that without exact sales on individual models it is impossible to confirm.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By michael2k on 4/28/2012 8:43:16 PM , Rating: 2
Somehow earning nearly $3x as much profit as Samsung is a bubble?


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Mint on 4/29/2012 12:28:18 AM , Rating: 2
You go ahead and believe that Apple can keep this up for 5-10 years (necessary to justify the current price), or that having over 3x the market cap of Samsung doesn't matter.

Apple's fat iPad profit margin will last only 1-2 years more. Same with the iPhone. After that, they will be profitable, but not enough to justify their current price. Hence the use of the term 'bubble'.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By michael2k on 4/29/2012 12:58:26 AM , Rating: 2
You really don't think they can keep this up by quadrupling the volume by halving the margin? Selling 4x as many iPhones for $400 instead of $600, and pushing the lowest end model from $375 to $249?


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Mint on 4/29/2012 11:41:08 AM , Rating: 2
In what universe does any market-leading product quadruple its sales with a mere 33% price cut? That would have be one insanely elastic product.

Samsung was able to quadruple through better products because it had a much smaller market share then than it does now.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By michael2k on 4/30/2012 9:29:15 AM , Rating: 2
The original model went from $600 to $400 after two months, and then selling a subsidized version a year later for $199. Sales went up 6 fold each time. China is a huge market, but a large portion of its population cannot afford $600 phones and Apple is likely to drop the 4 to $399 this year and the 4S next year.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Tony Swash on 4/29/12, Rating: -1
RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Mint on 4/29/2012 11:46:27 AM , Rating: 2
I shouldn't be surprised at your comprehension problem.

Houses are still worth way more than their construction cost. Just because the bubble burst doesn't mean houses are worthless. It just means that people who bought at the peak lost a lot. Apple isn't going anywhere. It will remain profitable for decades unless it royally screws up. However, stockholders will lose money when its profits come back down to earth.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Tony Swash on 4/29/12, Rating: 0
RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Mint on 4/29/2012 7:23:14 PM , Rating: 2
We've never seen this kind of sustainable gross margin from a company that doesn't have any truly inimitable IP or production ability (like Intel, NVidia before competition from RV770, etc). That's why Apple is suing everyone like crazy, because it's too easy to make a product that does the same thing. RIM is another company whose advantage (BES) was very frail.

Their App store was a huge advantage, but Android has effectively caught up, and once Windows 8 tablets come out then it will be dwarfed by the already existing x86 software selection. It won't be able to command a premium price anymore, and x86 will have "good enough" battery life.

Samsung has an even better supply chain advantage than Apple, as they're virtually the only maker of the superior AMOLED displays and fab their own chips, too.

All these factors - impending x86 tablets (and probably smartphones), Samsung taking over Sony as the premier overall CE brand, Android catching up - point to reduced margins.

I don't think Apple will collapse like Sony did, but they won't keep up the insane margins. Also working against them is the fact that their biggest cash cows are in markets that amplify cost differences: a $500 phone vs a $600 phone is advertised as $100 vs $200 with contract.

So no, Apple can't keep up these margins in the long term.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Tony Swash on 4/30/12, Rating: 0
RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By michael2k on 4/30/2012 6:13:37 PM , Rating: 2
You sound as if you know that Apple's IP is going to be "imitated/replicated" within the next 5 years.

I accept/concede that there are many competitors with enough pieces that they can in fact start imitating Apple, but I challenge the assertion because I can't name a single competitor with enough skill to actually assemble those pieces into a coherent whole. Of all their competitors I think Amazon is the closest with their online retail presence, low priced Kindle, Amazon App Store, Amazon Music Store, Kindle Book Store, and Amazon Cloud Drive, but they are still missing crucial pieces such as a smartphone, key software such as iBooks Author, XCode, GarageBand, iMovie, iPhoto, and the high end HW/SoC to actually compete.

Sony has the HW, content, retail presence, PSN, and games, but have shown absolutely no capability in the last decade of integrating them in any capacity. They will undoubtedly get better, but right now they are starting from just about scratch with their phones, PSP, PS3, and Vaios.

Microsoft has the content, SW, and OS, but lack HW and retail; their partnership with Nokia can fill in the gaps wrt to HW and retail, but again they are starting from scratch right now.

Samsung is the strongest competitor HW wise, and like Microsoft/Nokia, rely on Google to provide the SW, but they still lack the content (meaning movies, music, books, and games), the high profile boutique apps (especially since Amazon's App Store appears to be poaching all the dollars that would otherwise entice developers!) and there is no indication that Google has the strength to actually fill in the gaps. Google's goal is to be good enough, not to actually create something worth hundreds of dollars to the end user.

The Android App Store may have in fact caught up as you say, but only with regards to breadth and not quality; that same difference is what explains, today, the fact that Apple's Mac lineup can earn several hundred dollars more than most PCs, and there's no reason to expect that won't be true in the smartphone market until Google or a partner does the same for Android Apps. Windows already has SW, as you mention, but has never been able to command the premium Apple has despite that.

Samsung actually doesn't have a better supply chain advantage as they don't move enough volume, by themselves, to sustain a decent volume margin. In other words they sell 30m Galaxy phones a year where Apple sells 35m iPhones a quarter. You tell me who has the cost advantage with regards to volume.


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Tony Swash on 4/29/2012 7:59:42 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Apple's fat iPad profit margin will last only 1-2 years more.


That's what was said about the iPhone profit margins when the iPhone was launched five years ago and look at how that turned out. In the new mobile computing device age Apple will become as big relatively as Microsoft and Intel were combined back in the PC age. They have a way to go yet. My prediction is that Apple will grow revenue and profits by 80% in each of the next two years. What's your prediction?


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By Mint on 4/29/2012 8:00:29 PM , Rating: 2
My prediction is profits will peak at maybe $17B/qtr before 2014. Stock price will fall before then, however.

I knew this was going to happen to NVidia after the release of the HD4870 (june 2008) forced their margins back to earth, but didn't take action. I won't let that happen again. The question is when to start shorting Apple...


RE: Hindsight will be 20/20
By michael2k on 4/30/2012 2:28:29 PM , Rating: 2
Time to start shorting Apple if they cannot continue to add PC capabilities to iOS, cannot build an iPad4 with more CPU/GPU by next March (even if it means switching to Atom!), cannot sell an iPhone 4 for $400, cannot sell an iPhone for $300, cannot sell an iPad for $300, and cannot sell a MacBook of some sort for under $800.

The biggest growth markets for the next decade are much lower income than the US; if they can target the above pricepoints then they will in fact continue to grow.

The problem is that the iPad3 costs $300 to make so cannot be sold under $300; the old iPad2 is being sold at $399 and realistically needs to hit the $299 price point to continue growth in China, India, and Brazil. If they figure out how to make an iPad for $180 then they should be fine. The same is true of the iPhone for the same reason; it costs them $190 to make the 4S and probably $130 to $150 to make the 3GS, but they have to be able to push the 3GS to $120 if they plan on selling it for $299.

As with iOS 6, if they do not keep growing it's capabilities and features then they will be left behind by Android and Windows.


By mondo1234 on 4/27/2012 3:55:28 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
Reuters is citing experts as stating that Samsung sold 44m smartphones for the quarter.


Too bad Samsung doesn't report actual numbers. Maybe those are shipped.

According to CNNs Financial, ISupply reports different estimates at 30m activations.

Bottom line = good for Samsung




By mondo1234 on 4/27/2012 4:02:14 PM , Rating: 3
Here is the link, sorry.
Just different figures than Jason blogged.....

http://www.isuppli.com/Mobile-and-Wireless-Communi...


By someguy123 on 4/27/2012 9:59:04 PM , Rating: 2
According to that link they shipped 92m. Isuppli also notes that their unit count doesn't include companies who haven't posted results yet. 44M is probably samsung's estimates based on figures they receive from retailers, rounded up.


By mondo1234 on 4/27/2012 11:31:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
44M is probably samsung's estimates


But that is the problem, Samsung doesn't report the number of units at all. It's a financial analyst estimates based on revenue. Some manufacturers report the number of units they sold, others what they shipped, and others only the revenue and profits. Samsung reports the latter. That is why Jason states:

quote:
Reuters is citing experts as stating that Samsung sold 44m smartphones for the quarter.


rather than quote Samsung themselves. Amazon does this also, but they will say they have 50% of the Android tablet market. So that is 50% of what?

I don't know how ISuppli comes up with their data, but it is hard to refute either source. 12m unit spread is alot though. Both sources agree that Samsung sold more units than Nokia.

It doesnt matter to me who sold the most, just as long as there is plenty of competition in the market.

Bottom line is....Samsung is the only one that knows if it is winning and they aren't tellin.


By someguy123 on 4/28/2012 12:32:02 AM , Rating: 2
The reason they use estimates is because there's no system in place for 1:1 accurate reports from all retailers globally. Practically all of these reports run based on projection, or in Isuppli's case incompletely. The only place that has accurate sales reports is Japan, where they have reports coming in from retailers down to single unit counts.


By mondo1234 on 4/28/2012 1:28:00 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The reason they use estimates is because there's no system in place for 1:1 accurate reports from all retailers globally.


Sure there is. It is inventory and accounting (receivables). Do you think Samsung relies on ATT to tell them how much money (for how many Galaxy class phones in this case) is owed when ATT sells their handsets? Samsung chooses not to disclose. Apple reports sales figures (rounded of course). Samsung should know how many were sold, returned or are stock sitting on shelves. Without that data, they never know if they are over or under manufacturing.

I would think that Samsung would know the instant a smartphone is activated. Here is a write up from news today on the subject. Seems to be of some interest at the moment.

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/story/2012-04-27...


By someguy123 on 4/28/2012 2:29:56 AM , Rating: 2
You're talking accounting on a global scale. Samsung sell their phones in bulk to these outlets; they are not on loan or something to be repaid during an actual sale. It's up to the retailers to create plans or market these phones themselves. At that point, each individual retailer would have its own sell through (including smaller local/national shops, not just large corporations like AT&T). In order to get 1:1 numbers they would need to contact everyone who made a direct purchase and get their unit count, or try to aggregate everyone's revenue and extrapolate themselves. It's substantially easier (if not the only practical means) for samsung and everyone else involved to have a few volunteer/paid retailers that send their sales information to be used in projections, especially if you manage to get a larger corporation like walmart on board. This is basically what NPD does on all of their sales reports.


Risk Taking + Innovating = Winning
By Reclaimer77 on 4/27/2012 7:32:40 PM , Rating: 2
While everyone was playing it safe and trying to mimic Apple *cough WP7 cough* Samsung took risks and pushed the boundaries of smartphone form factors. Bigger screens and thinner while being lighter. Ginormous phones like the Galaxy Nexus and the mini-tablet sized Note were HUGE risks, much jeered at by the vocal iCrowd. Well the Note just passed 6+ million sales world wide, I guess Samsung is laughing now.

I for one am glad to see Samsung reaping the rewards of making dozens of phones and experimenting with different form factors. For pushing innovation and advancing the smartphone. Not content to sticking with the same 3.5 inch screen and same form factor for years just because it might be selling today.




By sigmatau on 4/27/2012 9:40:11 PM , Rating: 1
Andriod is way more similar to iOS than WP7. Same 90s style icon GUI.


RE: Risk Taking + Innovating = Winning
By B3an on 4/27/2012 10:43:26 PM , Rating: 2
WTF? Windows Phone 7 is nothing like anything Apple have. WP7 is one of the most original and innovative OS's ever. While Android is very similar to iOS.

...Oh wait it's just a comment by Reclaimer77, no wonder it's retarded.


By Reclaimer77 on 4/27/2012 11:29:39 PM , Rating: 3
Uhh I guess we're forgetting all about WinMobile? Sure seems like MS decided to go an entirely different direction once the iPhone came out and started having success.

But anyway that has nothing to do with my main point, just a little troll bait lol.


RE: Risk Taking + Innovating = Winning
By sprockkets on 4/28/2012 1:43:53 PM , Rating: 2
He's talking about form factors, not UI designs. Read the whole post before saying stupid sht.


By ShaolinSoccer on 4/29/2012 8:57:48 PM , Rating: 2
A rectangle phone?!


RE: Risk Taking + Innovating = Winning
By Mint on 4/29/2012 12:07:41 AM , Rating: 2
While I love the innovation of the Note (and I guarantee you that some execs at Apple are furious that they didn't think of that first, because their loyal following would have lapped it up), I wouldn't attribute Samsung's rise primarily to the form factor.

I think the #1 factor selling their phone is their freaking GORGEOUS displays. Apple could push DPI even further but it won't matter because LCD simply cannot produce the inky blacks of AMOLED. The amazing contrast gives your eyes a display experience that they cannot see in movie theaters, computer displays, LCD tvs/phones, or all but the best plasma TVs.

Having said that, it's the combination of the display, size, and stylus that's going to make the Note my next phone.


Long term support?
By lukarak on 4/27/2012 4:44:03 PM , Rating: 2
I LOL'd

See which samsung phones are getting ICS. Galaxy S, S+, with 512 MB are not getting it. New phones with 512 MB ram are getting it :D

Yea right, long term support.




RE: Long term support?
By OnyxNite on 4/27/2012 5:09:12 PM , Rating: 3
I think they mean Samsung is going to support Android as a platform for a long time, not individual phones. Unlike Nokia who is abandoning Symbian.


RE: Long term support?
By retrospooty on 4/27/2012 6:08:12 PM , Rating: 2
"See which samsung phones are getting ICS"

Meh... If you want it, go get cyanogenmod. If you are waiting on carriers and manufacturers to upgrade old phones, good luck. They don't want that, they want you to buy a new phone.

If you bought a phone based on an OS upgrade that may or may not come, you arent thinking clearly. If it didn't have the features you wanted, why did you buy it at all? If you want new OS, take charge of your device and flash it yourself.


RE: Long term support?
By Rukkian on 4/30/2012 11:20:38 AM , Rating: 2
I agree completely. Support does not equal new os upgrades. Support means patches for bugs, and security issues. Everybody whining about not getting every new thing that comes out for free is an idiot.

Buy a phone with what you want on it. Most of the people that get a phone have no idea what the os is or why it matters, and have no clue what ICS is. For those of us that do know, we can upgrade with one of the many roms out there (currently running the latest AOKP on my GNEX and loving it). That is unless you bought a locked down Motorola!

Do some research before you buy any product and get what works for you, do not plan on free upgrades for as long you own the phone.


mobile phone industry now a 2 horse race
By Ushio01 on 4/27/2012 4:07:11 PM , Rating: 2
We all now that normally sales in the holiday quarter are best so sales in this quarter will be lower which for every company but Samsung and Apple is dire.

Last quarter according to Gartner only 9 mobile phone companies sold 10 million or more phones. For this quarter I expect it to be worse with only 6.

Take a look at Gartners last quarter chart and guess which.

http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1935717




RE: mobile phone industry now a 2 horse race
By mondo1234 on 4/27/2012 4:04:10 PM , Rating: 2
server sales???


typo?
By AssBall on 4/27/2012 4:15:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
But the carrier features a big problem in that feature phones -- a market it long vanished -- are a dying market.


"dominated"?




RE: typo?
By Solandri on 4/27/2012 4:42:33 PM , Rating: 3
Damn you, autocorrect!


As a new Galaxy Note owner...
By 1ceTr0n on 4/29/2012 2:35:14 AM , Rating: 2
After giving up on Verizon on my old Droid X ever getting replaced with a Verizon Note and going with AT&T, I can see why now. This thing is awesome!




I just wanted to say
By ShaolinSoccer on 4/29/2012 8:59:36 PM , Rating: 2
Thank God for those awesome plastic surgeons in South Korea.




LOTRT
By Motoman on 4/27/12, Rating: 0
"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)














botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki