backtop


Print 19 comment(s) - last by nxjwfgwe.. on Jun 3 at 7:51 AM


U.S. Senator Rand Paul talks on his iPhone.  (Source: Associated Press)
Apple and Google beginning to overtake enterprise stalwart Research In Motion

For years, the one competitive advantage BlackBerry maker Research In Motion had over other smartphone manufacturers was its secure e-mail and messaging service. This made BlackBerries the simple choice for both corporate employees and government workers. But as the business-casual trend has made casual Fridays all but moot, the overlap of personal and professional has also led to more business and government types choosing (and begging for) consumer electronic devices in their professional dealings.

A new report from The Washington Post sheds light on the phenomenon that has led to more government employees, in particular, to choose Apple and Google products over RIM's recently.

"The best way I can describe BlackBerry is as a one-trick pony," Needham & Co. analyst Charlie Wolf told The Post. "The one trick was their secure messaging platform. Management has yet to understand that the world has changed. They didn’t understand that it was a software game going forward."

RIM's late (and unpolished) start to the tablet wars has also hampered the company at a time when more and more government employees are using Apple's iPad in daily work applications instead of a more traditional laptop PC.

The changes signify a cultural shift that has already begun in earnest in the corporate sector. While iPhones and Android smartphones are quickly replacing BlackBerries, Microsoft Outlook is being eschewed for Gmail. The Post reports that the General Services Administration is currently moving 17,000 employees onto Gmail. 

"People have better access to information technology at their homes than they do at work, and that’s especially true in the public sector," Vivek Kundra, the federal government’s CIO told The Post. "If you look at the average school kid, he or she probably has better technology in his or her backpack than most of us do in government offices."

The report cites a recent study by Forrester Research that found that 35 percent of U.S. workers "either buy their own smartphone for work, use unsanctioned Web sites or download unapproved applications on a work computer," saying that the technology is better than what their job provides; they use it at home and want to use it at work, too. 

And many federal workers want to carry one device for both their professional and personal business, rather than keeping a BlackBerry for work and an iPhone or Android for home. 

While much of the changes have come from employees asking for them, they may prove positive for management, too. Officials say the shift could cut billions from the $80 billion annual IT budget in Washington, all the while making workers more productive. The GSA's move to Gmail could cut 50 percent of IT expenses over the next five years since it will no longer have to maintain its own servers and will not have to pay for software updates. The USDA also is primed to save about $6 million a year by switching to Microsoft's cloud-based e-mail service.

The report points out that the adoption of consumer devices has been relatively small, so far, but it has reached a number of disparate agencies: 

At ATF, there are about 50 iPads or iPhones in use, and the number could increase to 100 soon. At the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the 1,000 BlackBerrys used last year have dropped to about 700 as workers picked other smartphones. The State Department is testing iPads. Congress now allows iPads and iPhones on the House floor.

All of the changes seemingly benefit frontline employees and top-level officials, but mean nothing but more bad news for RIM.



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

Not surprising at all...
By retrospooty on 6/1/2011 8:31:17 AM , Rating: 1
"The best way I can describe BlackBerry is as a one-trick pony," Needham & Co. analyst Charlie Wolf told The Post. "The one trick was their secure messaging platform. Management has yet to understand that the world has changed. They didn’t understand that it was a software game going forward."

That about sums it up perfectly. The only surprise to me is how long RIMM held on. People have been buying outdated blackberries 3 years past the point where rest of the world passed them buy. Slow learners I guess.




RE: Not surprising at all...
By Da W on 6/1/2011 10:11:53 AM , Rating: 2
Cause they are mostly baby boomers that are still scared of touchscreens.


RE: Not surprising at all...
By JediJeb on 6/1/2011 6:18:22 PM , Rating: 3
Or simply the Blackberry has everything they need and they decide to not change just because "everyone else is doing it". I still use my Moto V3, it makes phone calls and the occasional text message and that is all I need.

Well I did use the camera to take a photo of my dog to use as the background so I guess I did use more than those two features at least once ;)


By retrospooty on 6/2/2011 9:17:27 AM , Rating: 2
I get using an old phone that still works... But buying a new one with sub-standard features? That perplexes me.


RE: Not surprising at all...
By nxjwfgwe on 6/3/2011 7:51:10 AM , Rating: 2
^__^ONLINE STORE :

http://dv.gd/24993

we has been updated and add products an

many things they abandoned their increases

are welcome to visit our website.

Accept cash or credit card payments, free transport.

You can try oh, will make you satisfied.

http://dv.gd/24993
~ ¤ ??? ???
????????~???
,)))),'')~~ ,''~)
??¦? ??¦?
|?|?||?|?|
++++++++++++++safghrtj


Angry Birds?
By Kurz on 6/1/2011 8:57:16 AM , Rating: 2
I see a surge of more inefficient government. :)




RE: Angry Birds?
By jdonnelly on 6/1/2011 9:50:30 AM , Rating: 2
Impossible.


RE: Angry Birds?
By PitViper007 on 6/1/2011 1:23:42 PM , Rating: 2
No, they'll be just as inefficient as before, however now they have new and innovative gadgets to help drive that inefficiency.


RE: Angry Birds?
By mvs on 6/1/2011 3:12:28 PM , Rating: 2
You mean inefficiency is compounding?! [Reminds me of the Peter Principle]


Vivek Kundra has no clue that he is talking about
By sas_2010 on 6/1/2011 9:25:40 AM , Rating: 5
While I am totally agree that RIM is very slow on both hardware and software releases and cannot keep up with modern consumer trends, but as of right now there is no real secure substitution for Blackberry platform.

This "better access to information technology at their homes than they do at work, and that’s especially true in the public sector" BS comes at the expense of total lack of security, not something you want to compromise in government network.




By Aloonatic on 6/1/2011 10:08:27 AM , Rating: 2
This is why I'm all for philandering politicians. They might not care about their e-mails that contain information about you or me being intercepted/accounts hacked, but they will care about the messages that they send to their mistresses being snooped upon.

More affairs = more secure networks :o)


Group Policy
By damianrobertjones on 6/1/2011 10:14:05 AM , Rating: 3
If an iPad cannot be locked down by Group policy, then it shouldn´t enter or be anywhere near a corporations network.

Point made.




RE: Group Policy
By kattanna on 6/1/2011 11:11:15 AM , Rating: 2
yep.

quote:
more and more government employees are using Apple's iPad in daily work applications instead of a more traditional laptop PC


and just what sort of "work" besides email and surfing are they doing on these ipads?


RE: Group Policy
By Nutzo on 6/1/2011 11:18:13 AM , Rating: 2
Newer and flashier does not always make it better, especially from an IT support viewpoint.
The security model on iphone/ipads and androids are not even close to what's available on the Blackberries.


RIM Lives in a Bubble Like Microsoft
By Arsynic on 6/1/11, Rating: 0
RE: RIM Lives in a Bubble Like Microsoft
By Da W on 6/1/11, Rating: 0
RE: RIM Lives in a Bubble Like Microsoft
By Nutzo on 6/1/2011 11:26:14 AM , Rating: 2
Wrong.

Apple is just as much a copy and improve comapny as anyone else.

Apple didn't invent the MP3 player, they just repackaged it with an easy to use (dumbed down) software package.

Apple didn't invent the graphical interface, they copied (and improved) what was already out there (xerox).

When Apple fell behind in the OS battles, they repackaged unix and called it thier own.

The iPhone was a repackage/improvement of the existing smart phones with itunes added in.

The difference is that Apple manages to make lots of money by marketing it as new and trendy.


By chick0n on 6/1/2011 2:58:22 PM , Rating: 2
u forgot the part that Apple has a ton of sheep with no brains that follows every single garbage they released.


By JediJeb on 6/1/2011 6:30:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
With the advent of iPhone and Android, times have changed. Phones are no longer phones but communication devices. Who calls people anymore?


Depends on who you are. I may send 5 text messages a month, the rest is actual phone calls. Though I have though about actually getting rid of my cell phone completely just so I don't have the hassle of people being able to call me anywhere/anytime and expecting me to answer.

I do my computer work and browsing on a PC which has a screen big enough I can see it and a keyboard big enough I can type on it. If I want to watch a movie the screen better be big enough I can see it from across the room while sitting in my recliner. I couldn't care less about music so being able to listen to it on my phone is a feature I don't even want on it, and besides I can't stand to wear earbudds so it would need a good,loud speaker anyhow.

I'm a geek, but I draw the line at becoming a zoned out zombie walking around running into things as I watch a ballgame on my iPhone while walking down the street.


"I'm an Internet expert too. It's all right to wire the industrial zone only, but there are many problems if other regions of the North are wired." -- North Korean Supreme Commander Kim Jong-il

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki