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9to5Mac says that Patrick Pruniaux is joining Apple to assist in its "iWatch" efforts

Apple is on track to release its next generation iPhone this fall (reports suggest that both 4.7” and 5.5” variants are incoming), but that isn’t the only big release on tap for the Cupertino, California-based gadget maker.
 
Recent reports are increasing in confidence that Apple will also launch its own smartwatch this fall that will compete against devices running Android Wear. Apple has reportedly signed up such athletic talent as Kobe Bryant and Dustin Brown to promote the “iWatch” upon its launch.
 
The latest information on the iWatch to come through the newswires is that LVMH -- a French conglomerate whose brands include Dior, Hennessy, Donna Karan, and Louis Vuitton -- has lost a key executive from its Tag Heuer watch division to Apple.  

Patrick Pruniaux [Image Source: chronoscope.ru] 

Jean-Claude Biver, who overseas LVMH’s watch brands, told CNBC in an interview that one of Tag Heuer’s sales directors bolted to take to a job with Apple. 9to5Mac is separately reporting that the executive in question is Patrick Pruniaux, [now former] Vice President of Sales and Retail for Tag Heuer.
 
Apple’s latest hire might suggest that its smartwatch will be billed as a “premium” device that will command a higher price than the $199 Samsung Gear Live or the $229 LG G Watch (not to mentioned rumored $99 to $149 Android Wear entry from ASUS).
 
But then again, Motorola’s Moto 360 has enough of a “premium” look to get tech geeks all hot and bothered and it will reportedly feature an MSRP of $249. 

Sources: CNBC, 9to5Mac



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Fashion and marketing
By danbob999 on 7/4/2014 2:43:19 PM , Rating: 2
Apple is becoming more and more a fashion company and no longer a tech company. So it is natural they recruit from fashion / jewelry makers.




RE: Fashion and marketing
By GulWestfale on 7/4/2014 3:38:33 PM , Rating: 2
in the world of watches, TAG heuer is laughed at. they have never had the cachet of omega, the quality or (early) innovation of rolex, and they simply cannot touch real mafucatures like Jaeger LeCoultre. a few years ago they even tried to pass off a seiko movement as 100% in-house developed, and they rename the movements they buy from ETA 9aka swatch) to make it appear as though they were something unique and special. granted, plenty of others do that as well (ahem, breitling), but TAG, with its pretentious attitude, seems to be the premium douchebag watch brand par excellence.
so, an excellent fit with apple.


RE: Fashion and marketing
By inperfectdarkness on 7/4/14, Rating: 0
RE: Fashion and marketing
By GulWestfale on 7/5/2014 7:35:03 AM , Rating: 3
uh... omega has never been famous for its dress watches, but rather for the speedmaster and the seamaster lines.
as you note, TAG is a brand that is very focused on marketing. google "TAG 1887" and you will see what i mean. they claimed their seiko-derived (and actually licensed from seiko) movement was 100% developed in-house, and only came clean when watch connoisseurs found out about it.
that, and the lack of innovation, are the reasons why TAGs usually sell for well below their MSRP.


RE: Fashion and marketing
By GulWestfale on 7/5/2014 7:39:06 AM , Rating: 1
oh god... i just noticed you said the TAG F1 is a classic... lolololol
i misread that and thought you meant the Monaco, which is indeed a classic. made by heuer, not TAG heuer.
but the F1? a battery watch is a classic to you? lemme guess, you bought one and are now desperately trying to convince yourself that your money was well-spent?
well, good luck with that. whatever floats your boat. but don't pretend your acura is anything more than a honda in drag, please.


RE: Fashion and marketing
By aliasfox on 7/7/2014 9:23:48 AM , Rating: 2
Now now, let's not mock the TAG Heuer F1. It may not be high horology, but for the average man on the street it's a rather respectable watch, among one of the better pieces one might be able to find at a middle-market shop. And as a whole, TAG Heuer might not be completely (or even mostly) 'in-house' with ETA and massaged Seiko movements, but the Grand Carrera, Carrera, and Aquaracer are all respectable, and the Monaco is a classic racing watch.

One could say that TAG Heuer is good design and reasonable engineering backed by (usually) excellent marketing, but often looked down upon by snobs in their industry. I think they're a perfect fit for what Apple wants to evolve into.


RE: Fashion and marketing
By tonyswash on 7/4/2014 3:53:15 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Apple is becoming more and more a fashion company and no longer a tech company.


Interesting but of course superficial comment. A company that designs it's own CPUs, makes PCs, tablets and phones, has it's onw PC and mobile operating systems, has the biggest online store in the world, has just written and released a brand new programming language, is not a technology company? Because they care about design and make stuff that people find attractive as objects?

As digital technology migrates from complex machines likes PCs into handy pocket sized gizmos and, in the coming period, infiltrates our clothing and all of our possessions of course it is going to become evermore deeply part of the consumer market place. And the consumer market place is dominated by carefully and painstakingly constructed brands. That’s what makes consumer markets tick. That’s what Apple and Samsung both understand very well. Brands counts for an awful lot and building one is hard, and destroying one through poor product design is very easy. The future of technology is going to be dominated by brand. The notion that brand, fashion and technology are somehow separate domains is a quaint but out dated hang over from the PC days. That time has passed.

People like to talk a lot about the reduction of hardware to a commodity but look at some parallel product categories. Consider clothing. For most of human history clothing was a valuable and scarce commodity, most ordinary people might only own one or two jackets in a lifetime. Then came industrialisation and the mass production of clothing and in developed economies people routinely own hundreds of items of clothing, it’s possible to buy cheap functional clothing for next to nothing. Has that destroyed brand and the premium end of the clothing market a hundred years after it was commodified? Of course not. Clothes, which brands you wear, the quality and design of your clothing, says a lot about who you are and means an awful lot to almost everyone. Who literally buys clothes just because of the specification of the cloth without consideration of what it looks like? Almost no one.

Apple gets all this and have spent a decade and half building one of the world’s top brands so when it’s range of wearables (and I am fairly sure it will be a range, and some may well not be worn on your wrist) is announced Apple already has the brand and the retail presence to really make an impact. Apple have been investing a lot in what’s coming next.


RE: Fashion and marketing
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 7/4/2014 4:32:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Interesting but of course superficial comment. A company that designs it's own CPUs, makes PCs, tablets and phones, has it's onw PC and mobile operating systems, has the biggest online store in the world, has just written and released a brand new programming language, is not a technology company? Because they care about design and make stuff that people find attractive as objects?


Now you guys have done it! You have me agreeing with Tony...

DAMNIT!!


RE: Fashion and marketing
By Shadowself on 7/4/2014 4:43:21 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Now you guys have done it! You have me agreeing with Tony...


Uh, oh.

Anybody check the thermometer in Hell?

(((If it were Jason making this comment, we wouldn't even have to check. We'd know.)))


By Brandon Hill (blog) on 7/4/2014 8:35:13 PM , Rating: 2
I hope you don't mean to think I'm some Apple hater. I've only owned Apple iPhones since 2009, my current laptop of choice (for the past year and a half) is a 15" rMBP, and I also own an iPad mini Retina.

And with that admission, Reclaimer77 has just declared me an infidel and a Nancy Boy :-)


RE: Fashion and marketing
By MalcolmTucker on 7/4/2014 5:30:26 PM , Rating: 2
Well, most of those acquisitions occurred under the leadership of Steve Jobs.

Tim Cook has changed the direction to acquire talent in luxury.

Most likely, this is because a luxury device can command an additional 25% or more; and also the people who purchase them don't typically wheel-and-deal. When was the last time you saw an Apple sale..? 1997? (lol)


RE: Fashion and marketing
By tonyswash on 7/4/2014 6:19:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Well, most of those acquisitions occurred under the leadership of Steve Jobs.


What acquisitions? I didn't mention any acquisitions. Your comment makes no sense.

quote:
Tim Cook has changed the direction to acquire talent in luxury.


Here is a list of Apple acquisitions since Tim Cook took over as CEO (source: Wikipedia).

The acquisitions are listed by date, followed by company name followed by area of company expertise/activity.

Can you tell us which of these are are about acquiring "talent in luxury"

December 20, 2011, Anobit, Flash Memory
February 23, 2012, Chomp, App search engine
June 2, 2012, Redmatica, Audio
July 27, 2012. AuthenTec, PC and Mobile security products
September 27, 2012, Particle, HTML5 web app firm
2013, Novauris Technologies, Speech recognition
March 23, 2013, WiFiSlam, Indoor location
July 19, 2013, Locationary, Maps
July 19, 2013, HopStop.com, Maps
August 1, 2013, Passif Semiconductor, Semiconductors
August 13, 2013, Matcha, Media discovery app
August 22, 2013, Embark, Maps
August 28, 2013, AlgoTrim, Data Compression
October 3, 2013, Cue, Personal assistant
November 24, 2013, PrimeSense, Semiconductors
December 2, 2013, Topsy, Analytics
December 23, 2013. BroadMap, Maps
December 23, 2013, Catch.com, Software
January 4, 2014, SnappyLabs, Photography Software
February 21, 2014, Burstly, Software
May 2, 2014, LuxVue Technology, microLED Displays
May 28, 2014, Beats Electronics, Headphones, Music streaming «Beats Music»
June 6, 2014, Spotsetter, Social search engine

Your comment makes no sense. Maybe you are just expressing yourself poorly. Feel free to elucidate.


RE: Fashion and marketing
By MalcolmTucker on 7/4/14, Rating: -1
In response...
By JackBurton on 7/4/14, Rating: 0
RE: In response...
By JackBurton on 7/4/14, Rating: 0
RE: In response...
By retrospooty on 7/5/2014 1:14:11 PM , Rating: 2
Right... The obligatory jr. high school chant "stop copying me".

Grow up fanboy. Apple is just a company.


RE: In response...
By tonyswash on 7/5/2014 8:14:34 PM , Rating: 3
Ignore retrospooty, he always sinks into personal attacks when he can't think of anything of substance to say.


RE: In response...
By Cheesew1z69 on 7/5/2014 8:27:22 PM , Rating: 2
And yet, he is correct in his post. Apple is just a company. Unless of course your name is Tony or the other various Macolytes on this site.


RE: In response...
By retrospooty on 7/5/2014 10:51:53 PM , Rating: 2
No, I said exactly what I meant to say. Jack has a long history of thinking Apple invented everything under the sun and attacking anyone that thinks differently. He is an angry spiteful nasty viscous little puke with a hard on for Apple. He is actually just like an evil Tony from alternate universe. Where you represent a normal human with a good head that simply goes way overboard for a company, he is just pure spite. He literally posts nothing here but insults and vile accusations. Really Tony, check his post history before defending such a jackass.


RE: In response...
By JackBurton on 7/6/2014 3:19:20 AM , Rating: 2
You seem very butt hurt. "These are only companies."


RE: In response...
By tonyswash on 7/6/2014 6:48:02 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
He is actually just like an evil Tony from alternate universe.


I am honoured that you don't think I am evil :)

Chill guys.

The World Cup is on and life is good (except for the England team obviously). Shame the US got knocked out.


RE: In response...
By retrospooty on 7/6/2014 8:47:26 AM , Rating: 2
Of course you arent. You have great things to say when not overly enamored about Apple. Even when you are, you speak from a point of humanity. Jack? - Never a kind word, never an ounce of decency, never an inkling that there is a human being behind the keyboard, just pure spite, 100%. It's like dealing with a feral child.


RE: In response...
By retrospooty on 7/6/2014 9:42:52 AM , Rating: 2
Also, am I the only one that thinks Patrick Pruniaux looks like a twin of Daniel Tosh?


RE: In response...
By tonyswash on 7/6/2014 2:42:53 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Also, am I the only one that thinks Patrick Pruniaux looks like a twin of Daniel Tosh?


No :)

BTW this is my favourite soccer video clip. Prior to a match at Chelsea, a huge premier league club, the players were waiting while someone was making a speech when the very young son of one of the players sets off towards the goal. The crowds reaction is perfection as is his response.

http://youtu.be/ZzDB70d9AUU


RE: In response...
By retrospooty on 7/6/2014 3:21:19 PM , Rating: 2
LOL. Classic. Love when the tot gets a bit startled by the applause then raises his arms.


Not Necessarily So
By Shadowself on 7/4/2014 4:40:53 PM , Rating: 2
Just like all the pundits claiming for the past few years that virtually all signs point to the imminent (at least imminent every few months for the past few years) introduction of an "iTV", this may be a "connecting random dots to infer logic where there is none."

Apple hired Angela Ahrendts, but Apple is extremely unlikely to be introducing a line of women's dresses and handbags this year, or ever. It is just possible that Ms Ahrendts is filling out her staff with people with similar backgrounds and points of view as she has. This may have absolutely nothing to do with any "iWatch" concept that may, or may not, actually ship.

We'll just have to wait and see.




RE: Not Necessarily So
By tonyswash on 7/4/2014 6:41:10 PM , Rating: 1
I think your are right to wait and see, but I do think that the evidence that something is brewing at Apple is stronger in wearables than it was with the mythical Apple TV. For a start TVs are low value added items that work perfectly well for most consumers as dumb screens, I cannot see the advantage (in a world of Apple TV boxes and Chromcast dongles) to building the clever technology into the actual TV.

It's different with wearables. The technology is now making wearing very powerful kit entirely possible, it's just that no one has worked out how to do it in a way that makes lots people actually want to wear these things. A disruption and inflection point is coming but nobody knows exactly what, or who, is going to trigger the real change (certainly not any of the stuff so far released). What will happen is that at some point somebody will release wearable kit that takes off in the market and when that happens a whole new wave of tech change and mutation will happen. And when those sorts of changes happen fortunes are lost and made and old patterns of dominance in pre-existing product categories get shaken up and transformed. So there is a lot at stake. I am expecting that in say, five years, a lot of people will be using wearable technology but what it will look like and how it will work is very unclear. I think Google Glass will do well in the enterprise in areas where hands free working data access and imaging is useful but do less well in the consumer market because of the social awkwardness it engenders.

What is focusing attention on Apple is that on the one hand they haven't made a move in this area yet (just like they were late to the smart phone and tablet markets) and yet they have been hiring lots of sensor people so they are obviously working on something.


The "wareable" gold rush.
By siconik on 7/6/2014 12:47:59 PM , Rating: 2
As someone who has not worn a wristwatch for many years, and has no interest in getting one, I did a quick informal survey among my friends friends and colleagues (middle class professionals in late 20s and early thirties, northeastern US) and found this to the prevailing mindset. As anecdotical as this is, it makes me wonder if the expectations for this being a huge market will ever materialize. Younger generations seem to have been increasingly turning away from wristwatches whilst older ones who wear them out of habit or as status symbol would seem a poor target for such a gadget.

Of course someone may post a link to an article highlighting a 500% increase in watch sales over the last decade and blow this premise out of the water.




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