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Print 28 comment(s) - last by flyingpants1.. on Aug 6 at 10:39 PM

The i8 will be priced from $110,000 to $150,000 according to Automotive News

Most DailyTech readers lost their lunch when pictures of the small BMW i3 all-electric car were revealed last month. Given that it was designed from the ground up to be an electric vehicle, the i3 is not hamstrung by typical internal combustion engine (ICE) components, leaving BMW designers to be a bit more outrageous with their vision for the vehicle. The $41,350 price tag didn't win over many either.
 
With that being said, BMW's pricier i8 may capture a few more fans than the i3, stylistically at least. The i8 is definitely sleeker and even a bit exotic looking with its gullwing doors; but it's still a rather unorthodox design.
 
We have now learned that the production version of the i8 will makes its debut next month at the Frankfurt Auto Show. We don't know if the gullwing doors will make the but, but we do know that the vehicle's 1.5-liter three-cylinder engine (223 hp) and 170hp electric motor will definitely show up in production trim.

 
The plug-in hybrid is said to scoot to 60 mph in under five seconds, reach a top speed of 155 mph, and have an all-electric driving range of 20 miles. Due to its lightweight design (thanks to extensive use of carbon fiber) and efficient powertrain, the i8 will have an equivalency fuel economy rating of around 80 MPGe.
 
The BMW i8 will go on sale in the U.S. during the first half of 2014 with a price tag ranging from $110,000 to $150,000.

Source: Automotive News



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Did BMW know their targets?
By SublimeSimplicity on 8/5/2013 12:24:52 PM , Rating: 4
I seems like BMW developed these products in a vacuum.

The i3, for a car released 4 years after the LEAF didn't seem to learn from it. Its not much better looking, it has a little less utility than it, and its priced much higher. Will people buy it? Sure, but for a target that hasn't changed in 4 years, they didn't trounce it.

The i8 seems like it was developed without the knowledge that a Model S performance exists. I can't think of a way this car out performs a Model S and is about equal to it in price.




RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By maevinj on 8/5/2013 12:52:59 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
The i8 seems like it was developed without the knowledge that a Model S performance exists. I can't think of a way this car out performs a Model S and is about equal to it in price.

It has an ICE in it, so you don't have to stop and recharge?


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By SublimeSimplicity on 8/5/2013 12:59:45 PM , Rating: 1
How often do you drive over 250 miles in a day?

I'm thinking a 2 door sports car with minimum cargo space is not exactly my vehicle of choice for over 250 miles in a day anyway.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Shig on 8/5/2013 1:45:10 PM , Rating: 4
This just further reinforces the assessment that incumbant ICE car makers cannot make good electric cars.

It's a fundamental problem, the better your EVs do, the worse the core part of your business model does.

Fisker already showed us that 100k plug in hybrids with mediocre specs is pure fail.

Terrible cars like this just make Tesla look better.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Ammohunt on 8/5/2013 2:17:34 PM , Rating: 1
If you can afford to pony up the cash for a sports car like this do you think you would give a rats ass about 80mpg? Strange automobile.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By FaaR on 8/5/2013 2:31:22 PM , Rating: 2
Why wouldn't you care about the environment just because you're rich? That's sociopath logic.

Nothing strange about the automobile really, but you're a very strange person!


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Dr of crap on 8/5/2013 2:54:59 PM , Rating: 2
The Tesla roadster sold didn't it?
ALL electric - you know so no gas used!


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Mint on 8/5/2013 9:34:25 PM , Rating: 2
Barely. 2500 cars in 4 years, and that was when there was no competition for those wanting an EV.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Keeir on 8/5/2013 7:34:13 PM , Rating: 2
I think its a singularly wierd thought that once you have X amount of money you don't care about cost at all.

What is true is that for most people having increasing amounts of money leads to decreasing care about each individual dollar.

But even if I am putting 80,000 into a premium sports sedan, I think I am going to care (somewhat) if it costs 20,000 to fuel it versus 3,000. ~100,000 TCO is alot different than ~83,000 TCO. Even if I can afford 100,000 TCO, I am wouldn't be blind to a car of the same caliber that cost 17,000 less!


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By FaaR on 8/5/2013 2:28:13 PM , Rating: 2
The core part of a car maker's business is building and selling cars.

The more cars they sell, EV or not, IS part of the core business.

Jesus!


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Spuke on 8/5/2013 3:07:49 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The core part of a car maker's business is building and selling cars. The more cars they sell, EV or not, IS part of the core business. Jesus!
I rarely agree with FaaR but you hit the nail on the head here. Car companies build cars. They, unlike the extremist fanboys here, are not concerned with the type of cars they produce. There IS a target market for exotic EV's and hybrids and they will sell. I'll be honest and say I'd MUCH rather have a 918 than this car but there's nothing wrong with this car either.


By SublimeSimplicity on 8/5/2013 2:31:58 PM , Rating: 2
There's a saying, "When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail"

For 100 years most of these auto manufacturers' research has gone into refining ICEs. Most of the other components are farmed out to suppliers. So when tasked to make a car without an ICE or transmission, you get things along this line.


By flyingpants1 on 8/5/2013 2:55:45 PM , Rating: 2
Fisker was not a PHEV but a E-REV (electric range extended vehicle.. Whatever). Fisker did not drive the wheels directly with the gasoline engine


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Mint on 8/5/2013 9:29:42 PM , Rating: 2
Fisker isn't an incumbent.

They failed because they don't have any engineering talent. They got other people to design everything and put it inside a pretty shell (which itself was a very poor fit to the powertrain).

Otherwise, I agree 100% with your post. A mere 170hp electric motor? Only 20 miles range? And yet it costs up to $150k?

BMW has no intention of letting this car succeed. It's a token effort to merely keep them from falling too far behind until they're really forced to embrace EVs.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Reclaimer77 on 8/5/2013 8:51:45 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
How often do you drive over 250 miles in a day?


Can we stop this absurd talking point? It's completely irrelevant.

I don't drive 250 miles every day. But sometimes I do, like this weekend when I went to the mountains. And I didn't have to rent a car, or have range anxiety while doing so. And gassing up took minutes, not hours.

The masses will NOT accept EV's until charging times are on par with fill ups, and the range is equal. Stop raging against reality.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Mint on 8/5/2013 9:46:44 PM , Rating: 2
EVs don't have to worry about "the masses" for at least 5 years. 60%+ of households have two or more cars, and most of them will not notice a difference if one of the cars can only do 250 miles.

The i8 isn't meant for the masses anyway, so I fail to see your point.


By flyingpants1 on 8/6/2013 10:39:47 PM , Rating: 2
What if gas stations were more than 500 miles apart? That would suck.

I think the average person would settle for charging their car for let's say, 10 minutes if it meant they did not have to pay for gas.

EVs are the reality and you are the one raging against it.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By ScotterQX6700 on 8/5/2013 2:20:10 PM , Rating: 1
You are comparing the BMW i8 to the Nissan Leaf. Seriously?


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Brandon Hill (blog) on 8/5/2013 2:34:52 PM , Rating: 4
I don't think you actually read his post fully. He compared the i3 to the Leaf, which is a fair comparison. He compared the i8 to the similarly-priced Tesla Model S Performance.


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Spuke on 8/5/2013 3:13:18 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
He compared the i8 to the similarly-priced Tesla Model S Performance.
One could make the argument that the Model S is not a fair comparison either as you're comparing a sedan with a sports car. Two different demographics.


By Brandon Hill (blog) on 8/5/2013 3:37:09 PM , Rating: 3
Whether it's fair or not, I was just pointing out that he didn't compare the i8 to the Leaf ;)


RE: Did BMW know their targets?
By Flunk on 8/6/2013 9:52:17 AM , Rating: 2
I think it's a bit much to believe that BMW competes with Nissan in any meaningful way. BMW specializes in making overpriced luxury sedans.

Since the vast majority of BMW drivers buy them just so that they can be seen driving them. I don't think BMW will have a problem selling these. The set of people who want to seem like they care about the environment and the set of people who want to be seen in a fancy car has plenty of overlap.


By shmmy on 8/5/2013 2:48:24 PM , Rating: 2
The same crap was said about the Toyota Prius when it came out. "too expensive" "x car is cheaper and gets almost the same range\fuel mileage" Except look at it today, it is the best selling hybrid car and its platform is used in multiple models. The next generation is rumored to get 60 MPG.

You cant compare BMW to Fisker or even Tesla. BMW sells more cars in one month then most of those small companies sell in a whole year. BMW does not reinvent the wheel with each new model, they move slowly and improve over time. Like the i3 the carbon fiber body is a big deal. I believe no other car in the world is mass produced using a carbon fiber body. (mass produced being the key word. This is according to a source I know in BMW so it could be bias)

Will this car sell out and break records? Hell no! It is however the first step in the right direction. At the very least it will help the company achieve the fuel economy standards for automotive manufacturers that will pass over the new few years.




By Spuke on 8/5/2013 3:15:06 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Like the i3 the carbon fiber body is a big deal. I believe no other car in the world is mass produced using a carbon fiber body.
Oh! I forgot all about that one. Yes, that is major and I believe you are correct on this.


To BMW's credit
By Shig on 8/5/2013 8:21:39 PM , Rating: 2
The mass production of carbon fiber body frames is significant. Typically you have to go into the 250k+ range to get a carbon fiber body.

For example, the i3 is 600-700 pounds lighter than the Nissan Leaf. But it only has 20 miles more range and costs 13k more.

This leads me to believe BMW's battery tech / EV tech is years behind. The carbon fiber body frame, freakin' sweet though.




What the heck is a gulling door?
By typicalGeek on 8/5/13, Rating: -1
RE: What the heck is a gulling door?
By typicalGeek on 8/5/13, Rating: -1
By Rukkian on 8/5/2013 5:03:13 PM , Rating: 1
Or just maybe this is not a spelling blog, but is, in fact a tech web site. Your tone in your original post made you sound like a complete ass.
I doubt it was the author who down-voted you, it was probably the other readers on this site.


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