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Snowden wanted the public to have a say in how they were governed

U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden told the media his mission is complete after spending the last year leaking secret NSA documents. 

According to The Washington Post, Snowden said he revealed top NSA secrets so that the American people can have a say in how they're governed. But at this point, he feels like he came, he saw and he conquered. 

“For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission’s already accomplished,” said Snowden. “I already won. As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated. Because, remember, I didn’t want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself.

“All I wanted was for the public to be able to have a say in how they are governed. That is a milestone we left a long time ago. Right now, all we are looking at are stretch goals.”

Snowden also discussed how he came to the decision to call the NSA out on its behavior, saying that he felt the need to say something despite the consequences and reaction of the NSA and American citizens. 

“You recognize that you’re going in blind, that there’s no model,” said Snowden. “But when you weigh that against the alternative, which is not to act, you realize that some analysis is better than no analysis. Because even if your analysis proves to be wrong, the marketplace of ideas will bear that out. If you look at it from an engineering perspective, an iterative perspective, it’s clear that you have to try something rather than do nothing.”

Additionally, Snowden addressed allegations about his breaking an oath of secrecy. This oath, called Standard Form 312, is the classified-information nondisclosure agreement. But Snowden said his loyalty lies with the Constitution and the American people, and that top officials at the NSA are the ones who failed to keep their pledge. 
 
“The oath of allegiance is not an oath of secrecy,” said Snowden. “That is an oath to the Constitution. That is the oath that I kept that Keith Alexander and James Clapper did not.

“I am not trying to bring down the NSA, I am working to improve the NSA. I am still working for the NSA right now. They are the only ones who don’t realize it.”


Edward Snowden [SOURCE: Business Insider]

Snowden also made one thing very clear: he hasn't been working with the Russian government while being granted asylum there. 

“There is no evidence at all for the claim that I have loyalties to Russia or China or any country other than the United States,” said Snowden. "I have no relationship with the Russian government. I have not entered into any agreements with them.”

“If I defected at all. I defected from the government to the public.”

Snowden blew the cover on the NSA's surveillance programs earlier this year, which consisted of bulk data collection from sources like phone records, where the government took on a "collect now, filter later" approach. The agency has said that the bulk data collection was meant to identify terrorist threats, but it's been discovered that the data of Americans has been collected without any clear evidence of terrorist links. 
 
In August, reports said that the NSA admitted to touching 1.6 percent of total globe Web traffic. Its technique was to filter data after harvesting it, which led to over-collection on a major scale. It was later revealed that Snowden conned between 20 to 25 NSA employees to give him their login credentials and passwords while working at the NSA regional operations center for a month in Hawaii last spring. Snowden reportedly told the NSA employees that he needed their passwords in order to do his job, and after downloading secret NSA documents, he leaked the information to the media.
 
Many top tech leaders, like Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, have spoken out against the NSA's programs along with civil-liberties advocates, U.S. citizens and even other countries that had the NSA peeping in their window. 

Earlier this month, it was revealed that the NSA and its UK sister agency GCHQ sent agents into thevirtual worlds of the Xbox Live network, World of Warcraft, and Second Life to find acts of terrorism. 

A presidential review panel made 46 recommendations regarding greater restraint on the NSA's surveillance programs last week, which will have to be accepted by President Barack Obama and U.S. Congress before being put into practice. 

The NSA is debating whether to grant Snowden amnesty if he promises to keep his mouth shut. It is believed that Snowden had access to about 1.7 million files, and only about 1 percent of those files have been published by the media. Recognizing that a lot more could roll down the pipeline, the NSA is likely trying to prevent further catastrophe. 

One of the major recommendations involves the elimination of bulk collection of phone call records (known as "metadata"). The NSA said it collected metadata in bulk and filtered through it afterward in an attempt to make connections when searching for terrorist threats.

However, the panel said that this method of data collection hasn't proved to be more effective or beneficial than more targeted forms. It further stated that the program has made "modest" contributions at best, and that there's no proof the outcome would have been any different without the metadata bulk collection. 

"The question is not whether granting the government (this) authority makes us incrementally safer, but whether the additional safety is worth the sacrifice in terms of individual privacy, personal liberty and public trust," said the panel. 

Source: The Washington Post



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This guy is a hero
By ie5x on 12/26/2013 4:12:00 AM , Rating: 5
It would take an enormous amount of guts to do what he did there. The question now is, would anybody wake up?




RE: This guy is a hero
By Samus on 12/26/2013 10:18:05 AM , Rating: 3
I know this is going to be off topic, but if the NSA's metadata collection system works so well, why do we still have terrorist threats and attacks? Of course nothing on the scale of 9/11 (which we had evidence months beforehand was a threat) but we still had Benghazi (external threat) and the Boston Bombings (internal threat) ohh wait.

We knew both were going to happen. In the same circumstance as the Bush administration rejecting intelligence about 9/11, this administration rejected intelligence about Benghazi and the CIA/FBI really dropped the ball following up on Tamerlan Tsarnaev when he was being constantly flagged in their database.

My point is, we can have all the data and security in the world, but if it is negligently used, or outright ignored, whats the point. That, I think, is Edward Snowden's legacy. He brought to light all this stuff that is likely not doing any benefit to the security of the union, while costing us enormous freedom.


RE: This guy is a hero
By Perry Tanko on 1/23/2014 9:06:44 PM , Rating: 2
"He brought to light all this stuff that is likely not doing any benefit to the security of the union, while costing us enormous freedom."
Do you have any proof of that? Any?

That's quite a huge strawman you built right there. Don't let it get close to anything flammable, it will ignite really fast.


RE: This guy is a hero
By lifewatcher on 12/26/2013 10:51:16 AM , Rating: 2
Agree. Not only the paranoid should realize that you can't fight an oppressive government, if it controls every move you make. Fear easily pushes you into hiding inside a cage. Hopefully, you don't lock the door and destroy the key.


RE: This guy is a hero
By Ammohunt on 12/26/13, Rating: -1
RE: This guy is a hero
By Morland666 on 12/26/13, Rating: 0
RE: This guy is a hero
By MrBlastman on 12/26/2013 12:30:12 PM , Rating: 5
Good grief. You've said a lot of decent stuff on here but to take this position as you have is asinine.

A narcissist doesn't do something selfless that risks his own life, his own freedom, his own well-being and his own future. They would be horrified at taking any of those risks. What Edward has done has come at great cost to himself. His freedom is limited to only what some foreign country is willing to grant him. His fame, or, well, infamy limits any future success he can ever achieve.

So you think he thinks he is special and he can make a decision that affects millions of people's lives?

Well, guess what? He was chosen to represent America the day he was born! It is his birthright to stand for Liberty and our Consitution! As a patriot, he owes it to all of us, as a sworn public servant, to uphold not only the spirit, but the written intentions of it!

He has committed no crimes! None! If you say that his talking about sinister, illegal practices conducted by our own government are crimes, then you have gone mad. Since when is it illegal to announce to the public about injustices, travesties and criminals to the Constitution?

Never in our history has this been the case.

Snowden did nothing more than help us open our eyes to what is really happening inside. If you feel this is a crime then I hope you never serve public office. Only a monster would want the Citizens blind, silenced and subservient to control.

The true criminals here are not Snowden, the Criminals are the politicians that wrote into law the powers granted to the NSA. The criminals are the workers inside the NSA which violate our rights, every single day. The criminals are the leaders of these agencies that perpetrate and perpetuate these crimes, day in and day out! These are the people we should be holding our torches to.

Snowden loves America. He loves America so much he gave up everything he had and might ever have to help us protect our Liberties and Freedoms from sick people in our Government who'd rather strip them all away then give us an actual choice.

Did they ever give us a choice in the NSA? Did they ever put these features on a ballot?

NO!

Snowden is a hero. He's essentially the modern Paul Revere. Open your ears and stick your head out the window. Try listening again. He's out there--can you hear his warnings?


RE: This guy is a hero
By Ammohunt on 12/26/13, Rating: 0
RE: This guy is a hero
By Spuke on 12/26/2013 1:30:30 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Without the rule of law we are nothing as a people, When an individual in a position of trust takes it upon themselves to circumvent and go around those laws it tears apart our society.
Unlike others here "believe", Snowden DID indeed break the law. So did MLK and others during the civil rights movement. They KNEW they were breaking the law and EXPECTED to be imprisoned. Didn't stop them from doing what was right and just, just like Snowden. Sorry Ammo but rule of law isn't shit if it isn't just. Sometimes you gotta break it to change it and this is what Snowden did. I don't assign the word hero to many people and I'm still not sure Snowden fits it but what he did was most certainly selfless and truly was in ALL OF OUR best interests. He's gets a free room in my house ANY DAY. Thank you Edward.


RE: This guy is a hero
By ebakke on 12/26/2013 7:09:50 PM , Rating: 2
This. This x1000.

Of course Snowden broke the law. You cannot legally disclose classified information. It's absolutely an act of civil disobedience. And as you stated, some times the public awareness generated by the unlawful act generates the critical mass required to sway the pendulum and change the law(s).


RE: This guy is a hero
By MrBlastman on 12/26/2013 1:33:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
This government is our own creation the NSA is our own creation! The federal government is not King George in England. If say a President declared "i am supreme dictator and from now on i rule by decree" people would get out the pitchforks and torches; this in affect is exactly what Mr. Snowden did, threw out the rule of law and declared he knows whats best for all of us.


With all the secrecy the NSA has embraced including clandestine practices and plausible denial when confronted about any of it... as an employee of the agency, would you really trust your superiors if you blew the whistle, internally?

I sure wouldn't. I'd be scared for my life. The chances are pretty high that whatever you said would be covered up and a couple of weeks later you might have an "accident" with your gas oven in your house while baking cookies. It is either that or they'd fire you and deny you ever worked there--or hell, they might do both.

When you allow an organization to run rogue like the NSA has, it breeds an environment unsuitable for anyone to work for, but also for one to trust by the people. It needs to be removed.

quote:
You want to fix this? vote smarter next time, fire your representative and vote in reformers who will look for the other skeletons in the closet that we don't know about.


I'm not worried about my own voting, but more worried about everyone else. The system is rigged by donations, endorsements and a bought media who silence anyone that doesn't have enough money. That's why most people think there are only two choices to vote for--a Republican and a Democrat... because the news villfys or ostracizes (before they are ever heard from) anyone else.

quote:
Keep in mind i make these arguments with the fact that partly because of the second Amendment to our constitution our elected officials only have the illusion of power the true power lies in our hands.


We agree here. I think those in power right now laugh at us though, knowing most would do nothing.


RE: This guy is a hero
By Ammohunt on 12/26/2013 2:12:25 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
We agree here. I think those in power right now laugh at us though, knowing most would do nothing.


The percentage of the populations that pressed the Revolutionary war as i understand it was not a majority ;-).

Each person has different life experiences and for myself having participated in the mythical "Industrial Military Complex" on a number of occasions including holding cllearances i feel that the government is given too much credit. i.e. they can't efficiently run a simple three letter regulatory agencies like the TSA or EPA yet they can maintain a base evil hidden agenda with targeting killings of those American citizens that stray from the dark and spooky evil narrative? I think that also does a massive disservice to the brave men and women that work at these "Evil" Organizations doing valuable work.

So for me in order to believe that what Mr. Snowden did was heroic i have to believe that.

1. The NSA specifically spys on Americans for the purpose of 1984 style surveillance and thought policing.

2. Their is a dark and spooky entity in the government that enforces "Evil Law"

3. Other three letter government agencies can be trusted with sensitive personal information with a high potential for abuse like the Department of State,FBI,DMV or the IRS but the NSA hell no!

Just can't join you there brother.


RE: This guy is a hero
By Spuke on 12/26/2013 5:37:56 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just can't join you there brother.
Neither can I. Reality is FAR from fiction. Real people work at the NSA, the NSA has oversight, the NSA has a boss, the NSA (and every other gov agency) is deathly afraid of the public. The NSA is not who we should be concerned with here, they follow orders (I also have experience with the gov). There is nothing they do without approval from someone/some organization/some rule outside their agency especially for something on this scale. The people (politicians) that are responsible are throwing the NSA under the bus and doing so on purpose. It's misdirection plain and simple and this is Snowden's biggest failure IMO. He knows damn well how it works and he's putting the focus on the NSA and not where it really belongs.


RE: This guy is a hero
By MrBlastman on 12/26/2013 6:11:19 PM , Rating: 2
I sadly can't agree with that. The NSA employees should know better. Anyone working for the Government should. If any policy or required action oversteps the boundaries of the protections and freedoms granted to us by our Constitution, they, under all circumstances, should question them. The sick thing is nobody there has, until now. It took Snowden to open our eyes. Before him it was conspiracy theory crap. Now we have facts.


RE: This guy is a hero
By Ammohunt on 12/26/2013 6:29:00 PM , Rating: 2
When you work in a secure facility typically its compartmentalized by design meaning you as a worker are never exposed to the entire picture or all of the information. Snowden was in the same type of work environment the rest of the picture that we and Snowden aren't aware of is classified and thankfully so.


RE: This guy is a hero
By ebakke on 12/26/2013 7:00:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
1. The NSA specifically spys on Americans for the purpose of 1984 style surveillance and thought policing.
The NSA is amassing some of the world's largest databases for the stated purpose of protecting us. What the threat is, however, only they get to define. They decide (in secret mind you) who's a threat, what information needs to be collected, and what actions should be taken. The concern to me is *far* less that they're thought policing today, and much much more that they're putting all of the components in place to do it in the future. All it takes is one nutjob who blows up something, before they look at his entire life history and then start harassing every other innocent citizen who has X shared prior behaviors as the bomber.
quote:
2. Their is a dark and spooky entity in the government that enforces "Evil Law"
No, but there are the same greedy, selfish, evil, manipulative, and ruthless *individuals* in the government as there are every where else in the world. Except the individuals outside of government don't have access to the enormous and exceptional powers granted to the government. The sleezy guy who wants to use the resources of the FBI to snoop on his ex-gf is doing so, in part, because he *can*. The partisan hack working at the IRS can "investigate" the returns of a rising star of the opposing political ideology. The guy working at the grocery store doesn't have these options.

The point, is that we're blindly giving an organization an extraordinary amount of power over us and we're allowing them to exercise it in secret. We're also muzzling anyone who has access to any of the information, with the threat of imprisonment (or worse). Prior to the Snowden revelations the most forcefully the politicians charged with overseeing - the guys you keep telling us we should be working through - could object pubically was to say: "We believe most Americans would be stunned to learn the details of how these secret court opinions have interpreted section 215 of the Patriot Act."

There's also an incredible amount of pressure to silence abuses for the "public good". The argument going something like this: if this surfaces, people will lose trust in us, take some of the granted authority back, and we won't be able to effectively protect them in the future. Thus, we must keep X abuse by Y person/department from ever reaching the light of day.
quote:
3. Other three letter government agencies can be trusted with sensitive personal information with a high potential for abuse like the Department of State,FBI,DMV or the IRS but the NSA hell no!
I think there's a very credible argument that none of them can. Pick your favorite organization/department, and run a Google search for "______ employee arrested".


RE: This guy is a hero
By Ammohunt on 12/26/2013 9:25:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The point, is that we're blindly giving an organization an extraordinary amount of power over us and we're allowing them to exercise it in secret.


You just described all government that has ever existed the difference here as i have stated the government is "us" you your neighbor the guy buying cigarettes at 7-eleven. "Them" as in "us and them" doesn't exist as part of the United States government. If you have the skills and are trustworthy you can contribute in a secure fashion as well like i have and like millions of regular Americans do everyday.

Your base argument is that because they have the power they will someday abuse it. That is a huge duh! since there isn't a such thing as granted power without consequence frankly everything the NSA has done ans is doing has had oversight. The only controversy in my mind is the quality and quantity of that oversight.


RE: This guy is a hero
By ebakke on 12/27/2013 12:27:30 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
You just described all government that has ever existed the difference here as i have stated the government is "us" you your neighbor the guy buying cigarettes at 7-eleven. "Them" as in "us and them" doesn't exist as part of the United States government.
I wholeheartedly reject the notion that the government is "us". The government represents the people who voted for it. Don't for one second think that it represents the entirety of this country. The people who voted and lost, the people who fight for something different and haven't convinced 51% of their fellow citizens - they don't get the government that represents them; they get whatever the majority decides they get. The only reason we're "all in this together" is because of an arbitrary boundary drawn on a map, and the random outcome that we were born here and not somewhere else.
quote:
If you have the skills and are trustworthy you can contribute in a secure fashion as well like i have and like millions of regular Americans do everyday.
Did that for a few years. DoD contractors are in my opinion, the worst of government and the worst of Corporate America balled up into one giant bureaucratic mess. Glad I had the experience, and I will never go back.
quote:
Your base argument is that because they have the power they will someday abuse it. That is a huge duh! [...] The only controversy in my mind is the quality and quantity of that oversight.
What good is oversight when those overseeing can't share their findings with the individuals (you and I) tasked with approving or rejecting the actions and the overseers? It's about as good as a secret court that hears secret cases and makes secret rulings. You might as well just let the King decide in the privacy of his own quarters.

Just look around. Employees of the US government ("we" in your mind) are caught abusing their power almost once a week. For crying out loud, this specific issue with NSA phone records is an abuse of power - the NSA is explicitly forbidden from spying on US citizens yet that's exactly who this data describes. And it's done so that "if we need to look into someone with terrorist ties at some point in the future, we have the data somewhere". Then there's the IRS targeting particular groups. Or the ATF's gunwalking. Where's the line for you man? At what point do you say, "ok guys, you've crossed the line?"

The point is that governments abuse power. Duh, is right. So let's give them the absolute minimum amount of power possible to get the job done. If you think that's happening currently, then I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree.


RE: This guy is a hero
By nilepez on 12/27/2013 9:51:40 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
ebakke said,
quote:
3. Other three letter government agencies can be trusted with sensitive personal information with a high potential for abuse like the Department of State,FBI,DMV or the IRS but the NSA hell no!
I think there's a very credible argument that none of them can. Pick your favorite organization/department, and run a Google search for "______ employee arrested".


OK, if you're worried about the DMV, then you're way more paranoid than I am. Certainly the FBI can do similar things, but at least investigating Americans falls within their mandate (though only with just cause). Honestly, I'm more concerned about DHA and the DEA than the FBI or even the IRS.

People just accept that the DEA are good (the entire drug war is inherently EVIL) and the same is thought of Homeland Security, but it's way too big and has too much power.


RE: This guy is a hero
By nilepez on 12/27/2013 9:42:07 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I'm not worried about my own voting, but more worried about everyone else. The system is rigged by donations, endorsements and a bought media who silence anyone that doesn't have enough money. That's why most people think there are only two choices to vote for--a Republican and a Democrat... because the news villfys or ostracizes (before they are ever heard from) anyone else.


This is where you lost me. There are only 2 parties. There's a graph of our political parties from the first election to present (or close to present) and we've ALWAYS been a 1 or 2 party system. Yes, there have been times where a party split and for a brief time we had 1 strong party and 2 weaker ones, but ultimately it's just 2.

If you live in Texas, you can vote for whomever you like. If you live in a state that's actually competitive, you better figure out which of the 2 you like best, because your 3rd party candidate isn't going to get more than 1% of the vote.

You may love whoever the next Libertarian Candidate is, but he or she hasn't a prayer. Most conservatives aren't Libertarians and an awful lot of us who want a less authoritarian government can't stomach the Libertarian parties ultra right wing fiscal policies.

So then what? Do we put up a social libertarian? HAH! There's no chance in hell of the current right wing conservatives (or most of the people who claim they're Libertarians) voting for a fiscal moderate.

There are 2 parties. The fiscal policies for both parties mostly neo-liberal(laissez faire). No, Obama isn't Ron Paul, but on a scale of 0-20 (0 being pure socialism), Ron's a 19 and Obama is a 16-17. Only in America could Obama be considered a socialist. He's governed well to the right of what he campaigned on in '08. Even then on the Fiscal scale he was further from dead center than Nader in 2000 (though Nader was definitely left of the Socialist/Neo-liberal center line).

The Republican party may die (it will if the Tea party manages to take over), but from it's ashes a new party will emerge. Alternatively, if it dies, the Dems will split into 2 parties.

Now if the Libertarians can move fiscally to the left, while remaining centrist on liberties, then I'll vote for them. Gary Johnson had many appealing positions, but fiscally, he was too far to the right.


RE: This guy is a hero
By ritualm on 12/27/2013 12:33:42 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Without the rule of law we are nothing as a people

We don't necessarily need the rule of law. We need morals, ethics, and reason.
quote:
When an individual in a position of trust takes it upon themselves to circumvent and go around those laws it tears apart our society.

So why do you consider every terrorist act undertaken by Bush and Obama since 9/11 acceptable, yet under the same breath claim Snowden is a Persona Non Grata?

The Presidents and almost every single member of Congress and Senate are methodically tearing our society apart, yet you can find no fault in them? One insider comes out with damning evidence that our own security and intelligence apparatuses are mobilized against our very ability to live free from tyranny, and you find it so distasteful you are willing to question his true motives?
quote:
This government is our own creation the NSA is our own creation!

And yet they are all being used against yours truly. Epic fail.
quote:
If say a President declared "i am supreme dictator and from now on i rule by decree" people would get out the pitchforks and torches

Obama can say just that and very very few people will care because a huge majority of Americans are too busy watching reality TV and gossiping about the latest celebrity sex scandals. Epic fail.
quote:
[he] threw out the rule of law and declared he knows whats best for all of us.

If we are to preserve what little remains of our liberties today, we have no choice but to break the rule of law. As it turns out, the law is unjust. Why do you feel so compelled to defend it? "I was just following orders" has never been a valid excuse at the Nuremberg Trials, and they are not valid excuses today and tomorrow.

Snowden relinquished any hopes of seeing home and family forever, and possibly his own life, to do what he saw as an unprecedented attack on the US Constitution courtesy of the government and NSA. You wouldn't dare do that ever because you are an armchair general, throwing rocks at glass houses, while claiming you are somehow more "patriotic" than the former NSA intelligence analyst - and simultaneously forgetting what it really means to be a patriot.
quote:
You want to fix this? vote smarter next time

Kindly tell me how you can do this, when corporate money buys both sides of the political spectrum, where the Third Option is all but extinct? Your representative does not listen to you, he listens to the "people" who pay him big money to do what "they" want.

You want to fix this? Start a bloody revolution. Nope, not gonna happen either, because you're too lazy to actually defend yourself from quasi-eternal servitude.
quote:
Keep in mind i make these arguments with the fact that partly because of the second Amendment to our constitution our elected officials only have the illusion of power the true power lies in our hands.

As in you don't have a point. "the true power lies in our hands" is an illusion created by your "elected" officials. They would rather suspend the Constitution and its various Amendments, than follow them to the letter. They see them as an unnecessary expense in their quest for unquestioned power and authority.

The government needs to be afraid of the people. What we have today is the reverse. The time to replenish the dying tree of liberty with the blood of the patriots is long overdue.

Edward Snowden has broken the rule of law to preserve the Constitution, therefore he is no criminal. The real criminals taint the very halls and steps of Washington D.C. and treat it as nothing more than a 200+ year old roll of toilet paper.


RE: This guy is a hero
By nilepez on 12/27/2013 9:17:34 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Without the rule of law we are nothing as a people, When an individual in a position of trust takes it upon themselves to circumvent and go around those laws it tears apart our society. This government is our own creation the NSA is our own creation! The federal government is not King George in England. If say a President declared "i am supreme dictator and from now on i rule by decree" people would get out the pitchforks and torches; this in affect is exactly what Mr. Snowden did, threw out the rule of law and declared he knows whats best for all of us.


Wrong. Snowden gave us incontrovertible evidence that the NSA was breaking the law. What's more the head of the NSA lied to Congress. Strangely he's not been brought up on charges. This is the same body that either has, or has considered charging baseball players for lying about taking steroids.

I know plenty on the left and the right who love Love LOVE what Snowden has done.

As for the rest, give me a break. If he hadn't released these documents, we'd still have the NSA, Congress and he Whitehouse telling us that everything is fine.

If it was up to me, the FISA court would be dismantled or at least be set up such that it's more than a rubber stamp. Then again, for the government, even a Rubber Stamp isn't enough.

Sorry, but I didn't like this crap under Bush (or the presidents before him) and I don't like it now. As far as I'm concerned, if it's meta data for my call records, the NSA has no business looking at it EVER. The FBI may have a reason, but not the NSA.


RE: This guy is a hero
By MrBlastman on 12/26/2013 12:14:27 PM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure they will. The plethora of dimwits walking around that listen to the news and believe everything they hear is still as great as it ever was.

The funny thing is--if you try and talk to them about it they look at you as if they are confused that you're some kind of African tribesman talking in clicking tongues. Then they see a commercial for some stupid thing and are instantly distracted towards imagining their next purchase.


RE: This guy is a hero
By The_mass_Scrubbed on 12/26/2013 8:39:28 PM , Rating: 2
What is so heroic about sitting on your rear for about 3 years and downloading confidential data from your employer, a subcontractor for the NSA (all of it illegal, even the accessing of these files), passing it off to an equally opportunistic, the ultra condescendingly, smug Glenn Greenwald? Both conveniently ran away to tell their stories (also felonies because of how they chose to "spill the beans") rather than avail themselves of amazing strong whistleblower laws in the U.S.(no doubt with great help from the ACLU.) Snowden is infamously in Russia for another 6 months while Greenwald hides in in Brazil, though DOMA has been declared unconstitutional. How many (formerly) covert American have been killed through their "heroic activities"? Likely, in the thousands, we will never know the exact numbers.
Target's little security breach caused Americans far more actual harm than all of the NSA's work. It is ironic that the leaders of Google, Facebook and so forth are petitioning the courts to limit the government's exceptionally, very highly regulated access to your information; but neglect to state that they still will be collecting all of our data because, how else does a company that produces no physical property make billions$ They are just angry because the NSA could compel them to turn some of it over. BTW, they are still collecting it. Microsoft can turn on its Kinect camera and literally watch you in your birthday suit should they choose to.
Sorry for the long post but wake up America. The NSA, the ones who killed OBL are keeping us safe. Google is making billions selling off every detail about us, right down to your bare body.
The big internet providers, search engines, etc. continue to make a fortune selling of every bit of data about us, without a peep from the media. Why? Because, they are the ones doing it.


RE: This guy is a hero
By ie5x on 1/2/2014 7:36:05 AM , Rating: 2
I could have bothered explaining, but considering all I could say has already been by others before, and you still don't get it.... what's the point?


eh?
By superstition on 12/26/2013 7:07:54 AM , Rating: 4
quote:
the NSA is likely trying to prevent further catastrophe

You mean embarrassment?




RE: eh?
By erple2 on 1/1/2014 1:49:10 AM , Rating: 2
Interestingly, I recently took an official training course to try to get a clearance, and one of the qualifications for specifically NOT marking a document "secret" (or "top secret") is if it would cause embarrassment if said document were to become public. That implies that you can't mark a document as"secret" or "top secret" if revealing its content would embarrass an organization. So someone didn't pass that training class...


Our President, On our side!
By Chaser on 12/26/2013 12:32:35 PM , Rating: 2
We also know President Obama had nothing to do with any of the NSA's operations our policies. Our President is too busy fighting for us, the American people, and will not be distracted by these phony scandals!




RE: Our President, On our side!
By MrBlastman on 12/26/2013 12:33:47 PM , Rating: 3
You mean... he's too busy taking another vacation?


Edward Snowden
By Perry Tanko on 1/23/2014 9:00:28 PM , Rating: 1
is NOT a hero, he IS a terrorist.
Someone needs to put a bullet in him for destroying any protection the U.S. has against terrorists. He is one of them now.




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