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The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will go online next week, unlocking the universe's great mysteries. Many are fearful it might create a disaster. According to the world's top scientists these fears are not justified.  (Source: EPA)
Despite death threats, fears, and anger among some people worldwide, the LHC's scientists plan to continue with its opening undeterred

The $8B USD Large Hadron Collider will go online next week, becoming the world's most powerful particle accelerator.  It promises answer to some of the universe's most elusive questions.  Among these is the nature of the legendary Higgs boson, a particle long theorized but never observed, which is thought to determine how much things weigh.  The collider, which consists of 7 TeV proton beams harnessed by electromagnets to collide within a 27 km (17 mi) circular tunnel, is expected to unlock many other mysteries such as the differences between matter and antimatter.

However, despite its great promise, many people worldwide have protested the construction of the particle accelerator, believing it could end the world.  Many are fearful that the collider could spawn black holes, which they worry could devour the Earth.  The creators of the LHC, some of the world's foremost scientists, say such concerns are unfounded and convey a lack of understanding about the project.

According to Professor Brian Cox of Manchester University, the public animosity is so severe that American Nobel prize winning physicist Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has received death threats.  Professor Cox, typically sedate, adds irritatingly, "Anyone who thinks the LHC will destroy the world is a t---. "

James Gillies, the LHC head of public relations says he's gotten calls from people literally sobbing and asking him to halt the project.  He states, "They phone me and say: ‘I am seriously worried. Please tell me that my children are safe.’"

While some merely beg Mr. Gillies to convince them that the world is not going to end when the LHC is turned on, he says other take a angrier stance.  He states, "There are a number who say: 'You are evil and dangerous and you are going to destroy the world.'  I find myself getting slightly angry, not because people are getting in touch but the fact they have been driven to do that by what is nonsense. What we are doing is enriching humanity, not putting it at risk."

There have also been numerous legal attempts to thwart construction, none of which have succeeded.  Doomsday predictors argue that there is a small but serious chance the LHC will breed a cataclysm that could kill the world.  Since 1994, when the project was first envisioned, they have fought it.  They frequently quote Our Final Century?: Will the Human Race Survive the Twenty-first Century? - written by Lord Rees, astronomer royal and president of the Royal Society  The only problem is that Lord Rees says his book is not being quoted accurately, stating, "My book has been misquoted in one or two places.  I would refer you to the up-to-date safety study."

Scientists have patiently explained to those concerned many times that the most recent research shows that cosmic rays hitting the Earth daily have more powerful particle collisions than the LHC would.  Thus the added danger of the collider is negligible according to an updated 2003 study from the LHC Safety Assessment Group.  It dispels worries that the reactor might create a deadly black hole.  It concludes, "Nature has already conducted the equivalent of about a hundred thousand LHC experimental programmes on Earth - and the planet still exists."

While the reactor could produce black holes, according to physicists, they would be tiny and would not be capable of growing.  The study states, "Each collision of a pair of protons in the LHC will release an amount of energy comparable to that of two colliding mosquitoes, so any black hole produced would be much smaller than those known to astrophysicists."

Further, the LHC will be incapable of producing possibly dangerous strangelets, based on experimental information gathered at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, New York.

However, despite the world's top scientists confident in the system's safety, and the news media constantly seeking to sooth public concerns on the topic, many still remain vocally opposed to the project.



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Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 10:12:00 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
Many are fearful that the collider could spawn black holes, which they worry could devour the Earth
The hadron collider will generate micro black holes, perhaps as many as one a second. But calculations show these will evaporate in an unimaginably short period of time.

In all candor, those calculations *could* be wrong, and the black holes could persist. Even still, the amount of time they would take to "eat up" the Earth would be measured in the tens of millions of years. You have to propose silly extralinear effects to get any sort of real-time risk.

So there is a risk. About as likely as everyone in the US being simultaneously struck by lighting -- all 300,000,000 of us at once. I'm not losing any sleep over either scenario.

From a historical perspective, this isn't the first time we've taken such a chance. Before the "Trinity" H-Bomb test, some people worried the ultra-high temperatures and pressures wouldn't simply stop with the fuel in the bomb itself, but ignite the entire Earth into a mini star.

Quite obviously, they were wrong there as well.




RE: Slight correction
By DrKlahn on 9/8/2008 10:28:38 AM , Rating: 5
If they employ a Mr. Gordon Freeman at the facility then we've got something to worry about!


RE: Slight correction
By MrWho on 9/8/2008 11:47:34 AM , Rating: 3
So the so-called "resonance cascade" could be, in fact, caused just by two colliding particles in a particle accelerator?

Cool! But if that's so - who's real-life Doctor Breen?

And boy oh boy, do I want to meet Alyx! :p


RE: Slight correction
By DEVGRU on 9/10/2008 10:21:14 AM , Rating: 4
F*** Alyx, I want to meet DOG!


RE: Slight correction
By shin0bi272 on 9/11/2008 8:55:54 PM , Rating: 4
quote:
F*** Alyx,


exactly!


RE: Slight correction
By WTFiSJuiCE on 9/11/2008 5:24:00 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
Cool! But if that's so - who's real-life Doctor Breen?


I don't know, but for some reason I think he'll have Dick Cheney's face.


RE: Slight correction
By MrPoletski on 9/8/08, Rating: 0
RE: Slight correction
By realneil on 9/8/2008 5:56:41 PM , Rating: 2
Ha-Ha! Maybe he really could save us all,.......


RE: Slight correction
By plinkplonk on 9/8/2008 6:58:57 PM , Rating: 2
correction, we have nothing to worry about if gordon's on the job, using his crowbar he'll take down those black holes immediately!


RE: Slight correction
By bubba551 on 9/9/2008 2:27:53 PM , Rating: 2
maybe the whole world will end in 60 seconds.

Blah, blah, blah, Mr. Freeman


RE: Slight correction
By Fleeb on 9/15/2008 11:50:35 AM , Rating: 2
RE: Slight correction
By kayronjm on 9/8/2008 10:40:42 AM , Rating: 5
Ditto. Even these days, some people's level of stupidity is stunning.


RE: Slight correction
By SiN on 9/8/2008 6:06:24 PM , Rating: 5
hello!


RE: Slight correction
By kayronjm on 9/9/2008 9:14:38 AM , Rating: 2
Hello to you too, hahaha.


RE: Slight correction
By nah on 9/8/2008 10:48:48 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
show these will evaporate in an unimaginably short period of time.


Just exactly how do black holes 'evaporate ' ? Do they also exhibit this behaviour in outer space, and if so at what rate ? Also what is the ' unimaginably short period of time ' it will take for them to do so--a picosecond,a femtosecond ?


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 10:57:44 AM , Rating: 5
> "Just exactly how do black holes 'evaporate '"

Hawking Radiation. In fact, if the LHC proves this, Stephen Hawking will probably finally get his Nobel.

The speed at which a black hole evaporates is inversely proportional to its mass. Macroscopic black holes trap mass much faster than they lose it from radiation, and thus persist. Quantum-size black holes (the ones from the LHC will be much smaller than even a proton) will evaporate on the order of a femtosecond.


RE: Slight correction
By nah on 9/8/2008 11:51:54 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Hawking Radiation. In fact, if the LHC proves this, Stephen Hawking will probably finally get his Nobel.


So it's not proven yet-


RE: Slight correction
By s12033722 on 9/8/2008 12:32:47 PM , Rating: 5
The same theory which posits the creation of black holes also predicts evaporation due to Hawking Radiation. Thus, if you choose to be worried about black hole formation, you also have to accept the fact that they will evaporate. If you dispute that they will evaporate, no problem, because if that's true then they won't be formed in the first place. Either way, much ado about nothing.


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 1:43:02 PM , Rating: 5
That's not quite correct. Chandrasekhar initially proposed the theory of singularities long before anyone considered the possibility they might radiate. We have experimental evidence for black holes, but none for Hawking radiation. There is certainly the slim possibility that Hawking was wrong, and black holes can exist but not radiate.


RE: Slight correction
By GolaGuy on 9/8/2008 2:24:38 PM , Rating: 5
I find your lack of faith... disturbing.


RE: Slight correction
By kondor999 on 9/12/2008 10:09:25 AM , Rating: 2
LMAO. I love it.


RE: Slight correction
By Parhel on 9/12/2008 10:25:08 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Chandrasekhar initially proposed the theory of singularities long before anyone considered the possibility they might radiate.


Possibly his greatest work after Super Troopers.


RE: Slight correction
By brphysics on 9/8/2008 1:54:37 PM , Rating: 4
Anyone interested in this topic should read "The Black Hole War: My Battle to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics" by Leonard Susskind. He discusses in detail the mechanics of black hole formation and evaporation in a way that is understandable by the amateur physicists. It is available at audible.com also.


RE: Slight correction
By FITCamaro on 9/8/2008 1:15:05 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
In fact, if the LHC proves this, Stephen Hawking will probably finally get his Nobel.


No he won't. Al Gore will hop in, claim to have supported it all along, make a crappy movie about how black holes are the source of our doom, and steal it from him.


RE: Slight correction
By GolaGuy on 9/8/2008 2:18:13 PM , Rating: 5
Brilliant!!!!! We are all doomed... (Does that mean I still have to pay my credit card bill?????)


RE: Slight correction
By 67STANG on 9/8/2008 3:00:35 PM , Rating: 5
Don't be silly.. he'll say in invented the LHC.


RE: Slight correction
By ZmaxDP on 9/8/2008 3:42:47 PM , Rating: 2
Here here - now THAT is funny...


RE: Slight correction
By JonnyDough on 9/10/2008 3:07:20 AM , Rating: 5
Great, we could have a 3fer! (a 3 fer one)

Put Al Gore, ManBearPig, and filter the carbon in our atmosphere into the black holes to fill them up and walla. No more problems!

I might also add the presidential candidates, Britney Spears, Oprah, Hugh Jackman (actually I like him as Wolverine) and my Toshiba HD-DVD player which doesn't seem to be getting any more firmware updates to fix the freeze ups when I watch DVDs(provided I get a refund).

The list could also include but is not limited to: NVidia drivers, ball point pens, bearded women, the current U.S Patent System, cancers of various types, privatized banking, the health care system, taxation, the 911 commission, just about all EPA plans for biofuels, and of course, Chinese censorship of the Olympics. Did I miss anything?


RE: Slight correction
By typo101 on 9/13/2008 2:40:37 AM , Rating: 2
I'm sorry, did you just say "walla" instead of "viola"? Do you also happen to eat "freedom" fries?


RE: Slight correction
By MamiyaOtaru on 9/15/2008 2:36:52 PM , Rating: 2
What does an oversize violin have to do with any of this?


RE: Slight correction
By typo101 on 10/8/2008 4:23:36 AM , Rating: 2
AHAHA I just noticed this today! I didn't choose this username for no reason, as you can tell.


RE: Slight correction
By JonnyDough on 9/10/2008 3:09:33 AM , Rating: 5
Great, we could have a 3fer! (a 3 fer one)

Put Al Gore, ManBearPig, and filter the carbon in our atmosphere into the black holes to fill them up and walla. No more problems!

I might also add the presidential candidates, Britney Spears, Oprah, Hugh Jackman (actually I like him as Wolverine) and my Toshiba HD-DVD player which doesn't seem to be getting any more firmware updates to fix the freeze ups when I watch DVDs(provided I get a refund).

The list could also include but is not limited to: NVidia drivers, ball point pens, bearded women, the current U.S Patent System, cancers of various types, privatized banking, the health care system, taxation, the 911 commission, just about all EPA plans for biofuels, and of course, Chinese censorship of the Olympics. Did I miss anything?


RE: Slight correction
By mod8843 on 9/8/2008 5:37:55 PM , Rating: 5
quote:
Hawking Radiation. In fact, if the LHC proves this, Stephen Hawking will probably finally get his Nobel.


So, in the best case, Stephen Hawking gets his Nobel. In the worst case, Earth goes to hell. Sounds like a good deal for everyone!


RE: Slight correction
By nvalhalla on 9/8/2008 10:52:42 AM , Rating: 1
Ah, but this is only the beginning. First it was the atomic bomb, then the H bomb, now the LHC. Mankind's thirst for power knows no end and soon they will develop the Solanite bomb, exploding the sun and destroying the universe.

You're stupid, stupid!


RE: Slight correction
By Obujuwami on 9/8/2008 3:43:45 PM , Rating: 2
Wait....was that....Judges ruling...

I think that was sarcasm! *GASP*


RE: Slight correction
By nvalhalla on 9/8/2008 6:26:47 PM , Rating: 2
Go ahead, rate me down. We are all worried about what will happen in the future, for that is where will spend the rest of our lives. Future events such as these will effect you, in the future!


RE: Slight correction
By tehbiz on 9/8/08, Rating: -1
RE: Slight correction
By nvalhalla on 9/8/2008 11:01:30 PM , Rating: 5
No one likes my "Plan 9" references? I thought they were fitting...


RE: Slight correction
By TheKoz on 9/9/2008 4:22:11 AM , Rating: 2
I was damn impressed personally. You can't knock a classic.


RE: Slight correction
By quickk on 9/8/2008 12:42:07 PM , Rating: 2
The LHC won't produce micro black holes. The required energy is much larger than what can be attained in the LHC. To produce micro black holes at LHC energies requires the existence of extra spatial dimensions (which are purely theoretical at this point).


RE: Slight correction
By GolaGuy on 9/8/2008 2:15:33 PM , Rating: 2
Thank you, someone based in reality.... If we could harness that kind of power, we would all be driving flying cars and living like the Jetsons....


RE: Slight correction
By MrPoletski on 9/8/2008 4:00:20 PM , Rating: 3
My car flies (when I meet hump backed bridges)


RE: Slight correction
By Josett on 9/8/2008 6:17:30 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, it also depends on the number of extra [spatial] dimensions.

I'd urge anyone interested on this matter to have a look at this paper, first:

http://www.iop.org/EJ/article/0954-3899/35/11/1150...


RE: Slight correction
By Shadowself on 9/8/2008 1:30:42 PM , Rating: 3
Masher... it's all statistics. That's the fallback of quantum mechanics. Therefore you cannot accurately say that the LHC will create micro black holes. The statistics calculations indicate a very high likelihood of micro black holes that have a very high likelihood of lasting an extremely small fraction of a second. The same statistics shows that there is an extremely small likelihood of a macro black hole being created that has an extremely small likelihood of lasting for an easily measurable time -- but it is still non zero.


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 2:06:56 PM , Rating: 2
True enough.


RE: Slight correction
By DarthKaos on 9/8/2008 2:27:43 PM , Rating: 2
I think the weirdest thing that could happen would be if micro black holes were produced that did not evaporate. Instead they would be stuck within Earths orbit going back and forth through the planet turning it into Swiss cheese killing random people and animals until it finally did evaporate.


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 2:39:31 PM , Rating: 2
Exactly the plot of Hogan's 1979 novel "The Two Faces of Tomorrow".


RE: Slight correction
By Mojo the Monkey on 9/8/2008 5:39:04 PM , Rating: 2
I have heard this theory before, that any black hole created would some how remain in place earth would continue on its orbital path without it. Why would you not assume that gravitational forces wouldn't just give it the same trajectory as anything else on the earth?

If you do suggest that it would just "sit" in our orbital path, wouldnt this be contradictory to the idea that the universe is expanding, and that our galaxy and position in it is also constantly changing?


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 6:37:36 PM , Rating: 3
No one is suggesting the black hole would just "sit there". It would be subject to the same gravitational forces as any other object. The difference is that, once pulled to the earth, it wouldn't stop at the surface, but continue on down to the core, accelerating all the way. Once there, it would continue onward, converting its kinetic energy into potential, until it reached the same height it started at.

So in effect, it would be "orbiting" inside the earth, occasionally passing just outside it.


RE: Slight correction
By Ralos on 9/8/2008 3:26:04 PM , Rating: 2
What is the minimal mass (or, how many particles) does it takes to be called a black hole, all other conditions satisfied?


RE: Slight correction
By AnnihilatorX on 9/9/2008 10:09:50 AM , Rating: 2
A black hole is defined to be a collection of matter or energy that exhibits extreme gravity effects that even light particles (photons) cannot escape the event horizon.

I do not know quantitatively though.


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/9/2008 11:13:57 PM , Rating: 2
> "What is the minimal mass (or, how many particles) does it takes to be called a black hole, all other conditions satisfied? "

A black hole is driven more by density than by mass-- it has to have a high enough density to create an event horizon. However, very small black holes evaporate much faster than they accrete mass, and are thus temporary.

The smallest possible black hole would be one with a radius of one Planck length, a unit thought to be the smallest possible length of anything in the universe. Interestingly enough, the Planck length is itself derived from the concept of black holes...any object smaller than the Planck length could only be measured with particles with a wavelength so small (and thus an energy so high) that they would themselves instantly collapse into black holes themselves.

For a permanent black hole generated by the collapse of a star, I believe the minimum mass is about twice the mass of our sun.


RE: Slight correction
By JoeBanana on 9/9/2008 4:14:44 AM , Rating: 2
Of course it's non-zero. But think of it differently. There is also a chance that all inhabitants of US get struck by a lightning but you don't see anyone worrying about that.


RE: Slight correction
By GolaGuy on 9/8/2008 2:10:45 PM , Rating: 1
Are you kidding?!?!?!? Is it not typical of mankind to believe our minuscule actions on this planet could have such far reaching consequences. (Unless you count "global warming", which is another discussion...) Perhaps it is more ego on mankind's part to believe that we as species could harness such power as to create a "black hole". I, for one, seriously doubt it. We are yet to cure the common cold. Hell, we can't even get Americans to vote. For anyone to believe we could make a "black hole" to swallow the Earth, has been watching too much Star Trek... (Now go back to playing your video games...) I needed that laugh.


RE: Slight correction
By JonnyDough on 9/11/2008 12:12:33 AM , Rating: 3
Mankind is a funny thing. We are very akin to wishful thinking.

On one hand, we think that we can do no harm to earth. Yet here we are wondering if global warming is real and if we caused it. We made an island disappear with a hydrogen bomb. We've created deserts with deforrestation. We've helped animals become extinct and changed entire ecosystems with the introduction of foriegn species.

On the other hand, we believe that we have the ability to cause mass destruction, yet the universe will exist in chaos without time just as it always has.

Somehow though, I can't forget the lesson of the guy that discovered gunpowder. Upon his discovery he was blown to bits...


RE: Slight correction
By Xavitar on 9/13/2008 4:31:51 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Mankind is a funny thing. We are very akin to wishful thinking.

Statements such as this are akin to jibba jabba.


RE: Slight correction
By SlyNine on 9/11/2008 2:16:14 AM , Rating: 2
Go back to 100BC with your video games and you would be burnt for being a witch, or celebrated as a god.

You're arrogant for thinking your can, ignorant for thinking you cannot. But take a look around your modern world, communicating with people on the other side of the planet instantly, landing on the moon.

My problem is, they have colliders already, just at a smaller scale. Is their something about the size of this one that makes it different somehow. Does it have to do with trying to collapse the Hex field in to a piratical?


RE: Slight correction
By jay401 on 9/8/2008 3:11:25 PM , Rating: 2
So if you create a black hole, right, but it's really really small but also persisting, what would happen if you wave your hand through it?
THAT is the kind of science that would interest me.


RE: Slight correction
By JonnyDough on 9/10/2008 11:58:10 PM , Rating: 2
Are you sure you didn't wave your head through a black hole?


RE: Slight correction
By Josett on 9/8/2008 3:24:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The hadron collider will generate micro black holes, perhaps as many as one a second.


Could you back it up with some data, please?

Thanks.


RE: Slight correction
By JTankers on 9/9/2008 9:26:36 PM , Rating: 2
Hawking Radiation has been debunked.

Physicists who re-examined Hawking Radiation in the last decade determined that micro black holes do not evaporate. Their papers conclude:

"black holes do not radiate"[1]
"the effect [Hawking Radiation] does not exist."[2]
"infinitely delayed Hawking radiation" [3]

Dr. Rössler, a physicist famous for invention of Chaos theory's Rössler Attractor and for founding Endophysics, calculates exponential micro black hole growth (years or decades to consume the planet).[3]

If the Large Hadron Collider WILL create micro black holes, then the odds of danger might be... possibly... a probability?

[1] xxx.lanl.gov/abs/gr-qc/0304042 Do black holes radiate?. Prof. Dr. Adam Helfer (2003)

[2] arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/0607137, On the existence of black hole evaporationyet again, Prof. VA Belinski (2006)

[3] www.wissensnavigator.com/documents/OTTOROESSLERMINI BLACKHOLE.pdf Abraham-Solution to Schwarzschild Metric Implies That CERN Miniblack Holes Pose a Planetary Risk, Prof. Dr. Otto Rössler (2008)


RE: Slight correction
By masher2 (blog) on 9/9/2008 11:22:16 PM , Rating: 2
A. Hawking radiation hasn't been "debunked".

B. Rossler isn't a physicist. You can call him a biochemist, an "interdisciplinarian" or, somewhat less kindly, a fruitcake.

C. His 'fame', such as it is, derives from his opposition to the LHC, not from any outstanding contribution to academia.


RE: Slight correction
By croc on 9/10/2008 12:32:33 AM , Rating: 2
One assumes you have the data to back up the claim of 'will generate black holes'?

As to the Trinity explosion, as I recall most of the scientists felt it was a risk, but a small one. Some of the scientists felt that the risk was quite large. End result? Physics theory was advanced another step.

The LHC is in the same class of un-knowable theory. Once it is actually used, we'll know more, and probably with no disasterous consequences.


Another fun game?
By Fnoob on 9/8/2008 9:53:33 AM , Rating: 4
Anyone who thinks the LHC will destroy the world is a t---. (sic)"

Fill in the blank :

turd? total dumbass? tripped out tree hugger?

WTF did he really mean?




RE: Another fun game?
By dreddly on 9/8/2008 10:00:24 AM , Rating: 5
twat


RE: Another fun game?
By burritocream on 9/8/2008 12:09:38 PM , Rating: 2
Taint


RE: Another fun game?
By mezman on 9/8/2008 3:08:00 PM , Rating: 2
Probably was twat. 'Twat' is a very English term of derision.


RE: Another fun game?
By icanhascpu on 9/8/2008 5:20:44 PM , Rating: 2
I was thinking "twit" but i like yours better.


RE: Another fun game?
By nugundam93 on 9/9/2008 6:42:20 PM , Rating: 2
i like "twat" better.

oh wait, that didn't sound right. o_0

LOL!


RE: Another fun game?
By JonnyDough on 9/11/2008 12:01:19 AM , Rating: 2
All of the above posts show the intellect of the young children that post here on DT. Those that aren't kids, are likely lame old men who failed to have a family life but dedicated their life to meaningless careers.

Grow up.


RE: Another fun game?
By Spuke on 9/11/2008 4:53:25 PM , Rating: 2
You associate with these children and lame old guys by participating in these threads. Pot, meet kettle.


RE: Another fun game?
By JonnyDough on 9/15/2008 2:37:28 PM , Rating: 2
And yet, you replied to me. What does that make you? T-Bagged? The "Pot, meet kettle" thing is so overused on these forums. Give it a rest. It wasn't that witty in the first place, and it's older than the gold rush. Were you one of the above posters? I'm not going to check and don't bother responding. You associate me with one of these people that care about the morons on the net. But you see, I don't care. Idiot, meet ANYONE.


RE: Another fun game?
By papabear27 on 9/8/2008 10:03:47 AM , Rating: 2
I was thinking "twit" myself. I guess this is a good time to make my peace and prepare for the end.


RE: Another fun game?
By SlipDizzy on 9/8/2008 10:47:59 AM , Rating: 5
I'm kind of hoping they create some sort of black hole that will eventually suck in the entire planet but at some insanely slow rate... maybe like 10,000 years. I think that would definitely speed up space travel and it would be cool to throw stuff in the black hole. It'll be like a tourist attraction!


RE: Another fun game?
By BZDTemp on 9/8/2008 11:56:22 AM , Rating: 5
LOL It would certainly solve some waste problems.

Talk about THE place to get rid of nuclear waste, political opponents, ex-wifes, Florida ballots, ET-cartridges, red ring 360's, Hummer's, the other sock/glowe, WMD and it's the perfect place you lost your home work.


RE: Another fun game?
By dlr on 9/8/2008 2:49:43 PM , Rating: 2
If it landed in your belly button maybe it would keep the lint out.


RE: Another fun game?
By JediJeb on 9/9/2008 2:32:57 PM , Rating: 2
Hmmm just think of the weight loss possibilities of it being in your belly button.


RE: Another fun game?
By TechLuster on 9/9/2008 5:12:52 AM , Rating: 2
This is my favorite post in DT history.


RE: Another fun game?
By blppt on 9/9/2008 8:06:05 AM , Rating: 3
"...and it would be cool to throw stuff in the black hole. It'll be like a tourist attraction!... "

ROTFLMAO! Thats the funniest thing I've read this week....

Hey, maybe this black hole will solve our waste problems....we can just line up the dump trucks and dump our used condoms and such into some other dimension. Take that, interdimensional SUCKERS!!!!


RE: Another fun game?
By tobba on 9/9/2008 3:07:59 PM , Rating: 2
Yeah. And maybe that ll even make earth interesting for aliens... they´ll be like:

"Hey, lets's go to Earth, I heard they have a black hole!"

"Seriously? Sure... But isn't that one of those backwater planets? They'll probably bother us with lot's of questions about our technology and stuff.."

"Yeah, but they have a BLACK HOLE!"

"Oh... all right."

:P


RE: Another fun game?
By TeXWiller on 9/10/2008 10:14:02 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
and it would be cool to throw stuff in the black hole. It'll be like a tourist attraction!

Sorry, there would be a sing "Please Don't Feed The Hole!"


RE: Another fun game?
By masher2 (blog) on 9/8/2008 10:04:36 AM , Rating: 4
And why did Jason improperly use "sic" for a word that was editorially disguised?


RE: Another fun game?
By amanojaku on 9/8/2008 10:14:27 AM , Rating: 5
Because he's a t---?

Sorry, Jason, but a setup is a setup. :-)


RE: Another fun game?
By JasonMick (blog) on 9/8/2008 10:54:59 AM , Rating: 3
You're right, I am "a tall (guy)."

But I'm not "a thug " ;)


RE: Another fun game?
By KaiserCSS on 9/8/2008 11:51:52 AM , Rating: 5
I'm sorry, but that was just terrible. I would recommend sticking with articles. Come to think of it, those aren't very good either.

Talk about being stuck between a rock and a hard place. :/


RE: Another fun game?
By omnicronx on 9/8/2008 1:31:25 PM , Rating: 2
<sigh> Yet here you are, reading and commenting on his article.

Sometimes I think more people that complain about Jason read his articles than those who do not..


RE: Another fun game?
By amanojaku on 9/8/2008 3:13:47 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Talk about being stuck between a rock and a hard place. :/


Is that what she said?


RE: Another fun game?
By oTAL on 9/8/2008 10:08:38 AM , Rating: 5
quote:
Anyone who thinks the LHC will destroy the world is a t---.

tool!


RE: Another fun game?
By MrPoletski on 9/8/2008 6:21:31 PM , Rating: 2
lemme just say it, TOTAL RETARD.


RE: Another fun game?
By kellnertd on 9/8/2008 11:36:58 AM , Rating: 2
I bet they spent the night at a Holiday Inn Express......


RE: Another fun game?
By NaSnake on 9/8/2008 11:40:55 AM , Rating: 2
I'm gonna have to say tool.


RE: Another fun game?
By Shadeydave on 9/8/2008 11:44:07 AM , Rating: 2
I was thinking "tard"... but that's not very Euro.


RE: Another fun game?
By sk8josh on 9/8/2008 12:23:59 PM , Rating: 2
I'd say 'Tard'

why would they censor 'twit'?


RE: Another fun game?
By TylerMalone on 9/8/2008 12:25:25 PM , Rating: 2
Oh Come on now people!!! get your minds in the gutter!

T W A T

Defined as he meant : a fathead, a man who is a stupid incompetent fool

Censored for alternate definition: *unt, obscene terms for female genitals Sounds like "kunt"


RE: Another fun game?
By rklaver on 9/10/2008 12:12:57 AM , Rating: 2
Tard!


Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By amanojaku on 9/8/08, Rating: 0
RE: Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By AntiM on 9/8/2008 10:22:05 AM , Rating: 3
Yes, probably the same people that thought the world would end with the Deep Impact mission to Comet Tempel 1. If if were possible for the world to be destroyed as a result of the collision of a few subatomic particles, it would probably have been destroyed a few billion years ago.


RE: Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By porkpie on 9/8/2008 10:43:17 AM , Rating: 4
"bible thumpers"? At my office the only guy complaining about the collider is a left-wing enviro-nut. He's got the idea its going to generate radiation or be used to build bigger nuclear bombs or something like that. I can't make heads or tails out of what he says normally.


RE: Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By jsome on 9/8/08, Rating: 0
RE: Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By HiDumbasses on 9/8/2008 1:15:39 PM , Rating: 4
How much do you think it would cost to build a lab to study that, smarty-pants?


By Shadowself on 9/8/2008 1:24:45 PM , Rating: 2
Already being done at two separate sites. Look up the Fly's Eye experiments in Utah and Australia. The one in Utah started collecting data over 25 years ago.

The problem with these experiments is the instrumentation. Sure the energies of the collisions and subsequent particle showers is much higher than that of the LHC, but the instrumentation possible is much, much, much less. So while it is very informative to research very high energy particles from cosmic rays, the depth of the knowledge to be gained from the LHC is several orders of magnitude greater.


RE: Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By geddarkstorm on 9/8/2008 1:22:16 PM , Rating: 2
Control, control! You must learn control!


By GolaGuy on 9/8/2008 2:21:59 PM , Rating: 2
Impressive, Obi Won has taught you well...


By MrPoletski on 9/8/2008 4:04:02 PM , Rating: 2
wrong kind of collision.


RE: Bible Thumpers and Chicken Littles
By wvh on 9/8/08, Rating: -1
who else thought the title said..
By xti on 9/8/2008 10:45:48 AM , Rating: 2
Large Hard on?




RE: who else thought the title said..
By asleep71 on 9/8/2008 11:15:04 AM , Rating: 2
Thank you.
I needed that laugh this morning.
By the way, I saw a story awhile back with that typo in it. Don't ask me where or when, but it was just as funny.


RE: who else thought the title said..
By brphysics on 9/8/2008 2:01:34 PM , Rating: 4
I get it now the whole thing is funded by Masters and Johnson. They needed to build the Large Hardon Collider to study the Higgs Bosom.


By Clauzii on 9/8/2008 7:19:34 PM , Rating: 2
Ha ha ha :D


RE: who else thought the title said..
By Silver2k7 on 9/8/2008 11:19:00 AM , Rating: 3
nope didnt do that.. but you forgot about the

Huge Bossom particle ;)


By greenchasch on 9/8/2008 11:23:58 AM , Rating: 4
That would have been a lot funnier if you spelled 'bosom' properly.


Bad Argument for LHC
By Grouchy Old Hippie on 9/8/2008 3:41:12 PM , Rating: 1
Once again, I see the same dumb argument by scientists in favor of the LHC, and that is that these particle collisions occur in nature everyday. That is far from the truth.

The collisions that occur in nature that the CERN scientists use in defense of their project are based on particles hitting stationary objects at almost the speed of light. Such as x-rays and gamma rays colliding with Earth's atmosphere.

The difference with the collisions that they are attempting at LHC, is two particles will be traveling from opposite directions directly toward each other, with each of them traveling at almost the speed of light. This in effect, is the same as creating a collision of a particle with a stationary object at almost TWICE the speed of light. This DOES NOT occur naturally in the cosmos.

It was once theorized that matter itself was incapable of a velocity faster than the speed of light based on Einstein's equations. Einstein theorized that matter traveling faster than the speed of light would not collide at all, that the two sources of matter would pass right through one another. But Einstein did not have any theories as to what interaction would take place when those two objects of matter passed through one another at above light speed.

Sure, chances are that the Earth, or the universe, will not be gobbled up into a man-made stationary black hole. But they have all stated that it is a possibility however unlikely.

We have reached a 'zero error' point in our sciences, and pursuing the discoveries at CERN that these scientist seek to find is far beyond the 'zero error' scenario, and any errors at this level may be humanity's last.

You can also view my own artwork and article on this subject at the link below.

http://www.redbubble.com/people/grouchyolhippie/jo...




RE: Bad Argument for LHC
By MrPoletski on 9/8/2008 4:15:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The difference with the collisions that they are attempting at LHC, is two particles will be traveling from opposite directions directly toward each other, with each of them traveling at almost the speed of light. This in effect, is the same as creating a collision of a particle with a stationary object at almost TWICE the speed of light. This DOES NOT occur naturally in the cosmos.


You obviously haven't been studying your relativity. If you had you'd know that no two objects can travel towards or away from each other at the speed of light or greater. It is mathematically impossible, hubble expansion of space-time aside...

Thats right, one goes 99% the speed of light around one way and the other goes at 99% the speed of light around the other way. They do NOT collide at greater than the speed of light, only slightly faster than 99.5% the speed.

If you can't get that around your head, don't talk physics.


RE: Bad Argument for LHC
By mod8843 on 9/8/2008 5:45:23 PM , Rating: 2
What about the momentum of the resulting particles? As opposed to the cosmic rays, LHC is going to create particles trapped in Earth's gravity field. Is it not?


RE: Bad Argument for LHC
By Josett on 9/8/2008 6:07:38 PM , Rating: 2
At these energy scales, (pretty far from Big Bang-like energies),EM, weak & strong forces still have the dominance.
Most of the particles 'created' will interact with the detectors only. So, no, not really.


RE: Bad Argument for LHC
By MrPoletski on 9/15/2008 3:21:14 AM , Rating: 2
Cosmic rays interact in our atmosphere, which is inside our gravity well, or at least I bloody hope it is!

we're not talking double the energy than of in the LHC, more like 6 to 8 orders of magnitude higher.


RE: Bad Argument for LHC
By Fracture on 9/9/2008 3:04:08 PM , Rating: 2
I'm still figuring out this 99.5% thing, but I don't like relativity anyways.

I wanted to address the effect of the particle collision; while everyone above is talking about the creation of micro-black holes, I think the Higgs boson particle deserves more attention.

Anti-matter is a real thing and the Higgs boson is it's own antiparticle. One of the most elusive particles to be theorized, one of the main advantages of a larger supercollider will be (hopefully) to witness/record the existance of one of these particles as they fire anti-matter particles against regular matter.

The result is theorized that the collision frees the boson from the part that gives matter its mass. I suppose that if it were easier to overcome the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, it would be easier to create these collisions intentionally.


Far Side Scientist.
By Mitch101 on 9/8/2008 10:36:06 AM , Rating: 4
I think it would be funny if the top scientist sticks his fingers in his ears and shuts his eyes really hard when he says go ahead turn it on and backs away a few feet slowly or behind another scientist.

Kind of an homage to the Ghostbusters scene when they switch on the unlicensed nuclear accelerators and eon backs into the corner of the elevator as if it would make any difference if things went horribly wrong.




RE: Far Side Scientist.
By iheartzoloft on 9/8/2008 11:39:22 AM , Rating: 2
Ah yes, eon or Egon as some know him, now that is a role model. Not to mention my favorite Ghost buster.


RE: Far Side Scientist.
By FITCamaro on 9/8/2008 1:20:58 PM , Rating: 2
He was hoping to live long enough to get the satisfaction of seeing the others vaporize. I know I would.


RE: Far Side Scientist.
By MrPoletski on 9/10/2008 3:12:31 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Kind of an homage to the Ghostbusters scene when they switch on the unlicensed nuclear accelerators and eon backs into the corner of the elevator as if it would make any difference if things went horribly wrong.


He may have just crapped his pants, that's all.


The problem...
By GlennAl on 9/8/2008 11:29:52 AM , Rating: 1
(besides one being really stupid) is that it looks like all of those really "large" props used in bunches of sci-fi movies and TV shows that end up almost destroying the world.

Would it matter, though, even if the LHC did cause the Earth to wink out like it does in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (movie)? Sooner or later, humankind will find a way to destroy the Earth, either slowly (as it is now) or quickly, for you, your children, or your children's children, etc. It's inevitable, so why wait? :D




RE: The problem...
By bldckstark on 9/8/2008 12:46:23 PM , Rating: 3
I'm hoping the sysadmin for the milky way has made a backup recently. You know, just in case they need to rebuild the planet.


RE: The problem...
By FITCamaro on 9/8/2008 1:19:08 PM , Rating: 1
If I was that admin, I'd delete a few files before doing the system restore.

AlGore.hmn
MichaelMoore.hmn
BarackObama.hmn
NancyPelosi.hmn
HarryReid.hmn


RE: The problem...
By Spuke on 9/8/2008 3:42:34 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
It's inevitable, so why wait?
Death is inevitable, so why wait?


RE: The problem...
By GlennAl on 9/8/2008 4:39:58 PM , Rating: 2
Yes it is--death of the planet anyway. Best case: some object from space collides with the Earth several thousand years from now. 2nd best case: the Sun explodes (goes nova).

Famous last words coming from somewhere near the LHC next week: "Oop..." (He didn't have even enough time to finish saying "Oopsy!" before the Big Bang got reversed into the Big Suck. Oh, well. Earth Mk. II is on the planning table as we speak.)


Boson
By kontorotsui on 9/8/2008 10:48:08 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
Among these is the nature of the legendary Higgs boson, a particle long theorized but never observed, which is thought to determine how much things weigh.


Gravity determines weight.
Should be corrected to "which is thought to determine the mass".




RE: Boson
By eyeSIS on 9/8/2008 1:23:43 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Gravity determines weight. Should be corrected to "which is thought to determine the mass".


Actually, they meant what they said. The Higgs boson is possibly the interaction boson for gravitational waves. So, yes, it will hopefully tell us how to determine how much things weigh.


RE: Boson
By MarkHark on 9/8/2008 2:52:57 PM , Rating: 2
I believe the theoretical particle tht mediates gravitational interactions is called a "graviton".

The Higgs' bosom, AFAIK, is thought to determine mass itself (and consequentially, inertia).


RE: Boson
By MrPoletski on 9/8/2008 4:06:54 PM , Rating: 2
yes, the higgs boson supposedly determines whether an object has mass or not.

The graviton is the particle used to transmit gravitational energy (theoretically) (much like photons transmit em energy)


Low Cost Equipment!
By ancient46 on 9/8/2008 10:37:07 AM , Rating: 2
Wow a particle accelerator that only costs $88 USD! I wonder if one would fit in mt backyard.




RE: Low Cost Equipment!
By foxtrot9 on 9/8/2008 10:44:58 AM , Rating: 2
$8B - read carefully


RE: Low Cost Equipment!
By glennpratt on 9/8/2008 10:47:24 AM , Rating: 2
Looks like $8B USD to me, but maybe they changed it on ya.


As long as Hawking is remotely correct
By dickeywang on 9/8/2008 11:43:07 AM , Rating: 2
We don't need to worry about it at all.




RE: As long as Hawking is remotely correct
By UppityMatt on 9/8/2008 12:01:48 PM , Rating: 2
I will put my faith in him.


By jRaskell on 9/8/2008 2:06:21 PM , Rating: 2
I certainly put more faith in Hawking than all these crackpot doomsday prophets.


By bubba551 on 9/8/2008 2:05:05 PM , Rating: 2
Wouldn't a remote island be a much better choice?




By jchamb3 on 9/8/2008 2:10:59 PM , Rating: 4
like ... England? :)


Large Hadron Rap
By slacktastic on 9/8/2008 3:11:17 PM , Rating: 2
RE: Large Hadron Rap
By Clauzii on 9/8/2008 7:12:12 PM , Rating: 1
Rapping scientists - nice one!

Also MSNBC have a tour thru LHC:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26562876/


RE: Large Hadron Rap
By Clauzii on 9/13/2008 9:22:50 AM , Rating: 2
Down? That was fun..


collider
By bobh20 on 9/8/2008 10:44:05 AM , Rating: 2
What concerns me is not that this particular experiment will "end the world" but rather who oversees this stuff? I mean, who decides this is safe,or worth the risk? Other scientist? Governments? Jeez, no profession has a record of complete innocence of a confict of interest, who's watching over these guys? and what if we decided it wasn't worth the risk? Who would stop them? Anybody?




RE: collider
By kickwormjoe on 9/8/2008 12:07:01 PM , Rating: 2
The people providing these guys the money to do what they do. Quoted from the wiki:

quote:
The LHC is the world's largest and the highest-energy particle accelerator. It is funded and built in collaboration with over eight thousand physicists from over eighty-five countries as well as hundreds of universities and laboratories.


I'm sure if this experiment were really that dangerous, the funding would stop.


It's been good
By ikkeman2 on 9/8/2008 10:56:11 AM , Rating: 4
Well, Just in case the anti lobby is right - I'd like to take this time to declare to all the scientists knowitall ... persons that they told you so.
I't really frustrating to predict the end of the world. When you turn out to be right, no-one will thank you, and when you are wrong, you're an idiot.
The pro particle bouncer poeple have it easy. When they're right, they get a lauch at the protestors expense, and if they're wrong... no-one is left to care.

Just live each day as if it's the last, and you'll bever be disappointed!




Large Hadron Collider
By ipkiss01 on 9/8/2008 10:58:34 AM , Rating: 2
Mitch101 wrote

"I think it would be funny if the top scientist sticks his fingers in his ears and shuts his eyes really hard when he says go ahead turn it on and backs away a few feet slowly or behind another scientist"

Mitch101, I practically fell off my chair laughing when I read your comment... I couldn't stop picturing some labcoated weenie smoking a swoopy pipe & plug his ears and step back a pace or two... hysterical! That was the laugh I needed to face a Monday morning at work :-D




RE: Large Hadron Collider
By clearsky007 on 9/8/2008 2:00:55 PM , Rating: 2
I would pay to see that happen. LOL


Irony
By Ratinator on 9/8/2008 12:24:44 PM , Rating: 2
I like the irony in that it requires the largest piece of electronic equipment ever built to find and work with the smallest particles known to man. To further this, it is those smallest particles that will give way to some of the biggest discoveries we will ever encounter.




RE: Irony
By eyeSIS on 9/8/2008 1:27:41 PM , Rating: 2
Aye, that's Physics.


Did anyone think of...
By physignorant on 9/8/2008 1:17:21 PM , Rating: 2
I wonder if this will be the the "signal" that is noticed by other beings in the universe. So may SciFi stories are based on some event that ripples throughout the universe and brings some response. Just wondered...




RE: Did anyone think of...
By Josett on 9/8/2008 5:49:41 PM , Rating: 2
Nope. That'll be a reverse-engineered iPhone...


Coincidence?
By cmonroe on 9/8/2008 1:21:31 PM , Rating: 2
Hmmm... Look at the guy in the picture. Paint that helmet black, and give him a face shield, and he could be a Death Star Trooper getting ready to fire the Turbolaser that destroyed the planet Alderaan.

Just a thought...




RE: Coincidence?
By nugundam93 on 9/9/2008 6:57:18 PM , Rating: 2
hahahahaha yeah! just give the helmet the pointy snout and we're ready to blast alderaan.


Stupid Type 13 Planet
By bubba551 on 9/8/2008 1:21:37 PM , Rating: 2
in its final stages.




RE: Stupid Type 13 Planet
By icanhascpu on 9/11/2008 12:27:33 AM , Rating: 2
I was watching the very Lexx episode that I think youre referancing to as this story came up.

A bit creepy!


No worries
By clearsky007 on 9/8/2008 1:32:25 PM , Rating: 1
To many people worry to much, Everything you use today is due to science. Computers Cell phones, medical treatment.
Simple fact we are technically behind.
Don't treat this like the Dark ages and witch hunts. embrace the unknown, learn to understand it and don't listen to hearsay from 3rd party people. Research it your self, you have the most powerful tool at your disposal its called the internet.
The greatest achievements are based from the human imagination, and taking the leap.
There are things out there far more dangerous than this Hadron Collider, the Y2k bug was deemed a world ender as was Haley's Comet.
Just think IBM has a tachyon hard drive and much more in their warehouses that can't even be used yet because consumer markets are 20 years behind.
I would love to be at ground zero of this power on of the Hadron Collider it will be history in the making and you should be proud to be part of history.
Here is simple scale of danger left side = what is more than likely will or has happened.
1. Polar magnetic change vs Hadron Collider
2. Terrorist flying planes in to buildings vs Hadron Collider
3. Getting robbed at gun point vs Hadron Collider
4. Microsoft become a country vs Hadron Collider.
5. Meteor hitting the earth vs hadron collider
Don’t trip out on this, be excited.




RE: No worries
By Spectator on 9/8/2008 1:50:00 PM , Rating: 2
lol. you know how we have not found other inteligent life yet. but have found a few black holes..

well that was inteligent life; they were just messing about. learning how black holes were formed. sht hit fan and they doomed the planet. :). whats that quote about history repeating itself?. lmao

Chukkle.

But i do agree to "some" extent with the concept of playing with things we dont fully understand. I just hope it does not end in some mad ass chain reaction.

I am all for advancement of knowledge. "unless its some oppressed nuke happy country :P".


RE: No worries
By clearsky007 on 9/8/2008 1:58:23 PM , Rating: 1
Sorry let me clarify "Technically behind"
I was referring to technology that has been created but not yet released becuase society is not ready for it or market place hasn't caught up yet.

That was my bad for not clarifying more.


I promise not to complain
By johntmosher on 9/8/2008 5:24:59 PM , Rating: 2
If we all die I promise not to complain. There will be nobody to listen anyway.
Seriously though - The chance of great benefits is so much greater than any risks so this is a wonderful experiment.
I want my anti-gravity car that can travel around the earth with just an AAA battery.




RE: I promise not to complain
By Fnoob on 9/8/2008 8:02:32 PM , Rating: 2
Your anti-gravity car will be FREE (with battery purchase).


By richard0thomas on 9/10/2008 12:59:07 AM , Rating: 2
There is a leaked video on You Tube from CERN (LHC Black hole simulation Large Hadron Collider CERN) there is more to this than meets the eye, the black hole is not the concern, it is the revelation that may shatter our perception of reality.

The link is on http://godparticle.net which has insight into the revelation. Do you really think they would spend 6 billion dollars just to find a particle? The truth is related to energy, the ability to turn mass on and off, and the revelation. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFYlbsTlCk0




By Mojo the Monkey on 9/11/2008 4:45:09 PM , Rating: 2
your leaked video is amateur-hour wanna-be-music-video crap with BS words overlayed.


Overkill
By fishbits on 9/8/2008 11:32:38 AM , Rating: 3
Mega-expensive super-collider? That's ridiculous overkill. I can destroy the planet, which we live on, with an incandescent light bulb and a mini-van. Stop mocking doomsday cults; scientists agree the end is nigh!




I stopped paying my bills.
By snownpaint on 9/8/2008 11:54:39 AM , Rating: 2
I guess I wont have to pay that ticket I got today for not wearing my seat belt and for throwing my cig butt out the window. The black hole will suck this all away..




Who Cares?
By JatoThed on 9/8/2008 12:04:22 PM , Rating: 2
I don't believe that anything untoward will happen as a result of the machine being turned on, but let's suppose that it did, and the world ceased existing in the blink of an eye. Who would care? I'm not a world hater, it's just a question.




article follow up
By tastyratz on 9/8/2008 12:09:11 PM , Rating: 2
Jason Mick reporting a followup to our original article on the Collider. Speaking to scientists involved in the project it appears they were wrong about the machine annihilating the planet earth.As the black hole grows and slowly sucks the planet in we have an inside scoop. Officially Quoted from the team involved is the following response:
"oops"




black holes
By tech boy on 9/8/2008 12:54:19 PM , Rating: 2
oh my babies! oh my babies! please tell me they will be alright

should i hide in a cave?




We're all gonners
By Aristophanes777 on 9/8/2008 12:57:38 PM , Rating: 2
OMG we are all going to be eaten up by a foreign black hole!
How very fitting that its made in Europe.

Need to empty bank account in <a week!




New Energy
By TheNuts on 9/8/2008 1:12:58 PM , Rating: 2
Is there any way they could throw some bigger stuff in there to create some massive amounts of energy to be transported to the US and relieve us from foreign oil?

Say a couple of semi trucks or a couple of nuclear missles or Steve Jobs and Bill Gates?




Hello Mr. Freeman
By Samash on 9/8/2008 1:32:15 PM , Rating: 2
I hope all have your crowbars purchased and at the ready.




what should we do?
By Gogh on 9/8/2008 1:48:23 PM , Rating: 2
BAR KEEP: Should we liedown on the ground, or put bags over our heads or something?

Stange Customer: If you like...

BAR KEEP: Would it help?

Stange Customer: Nope.




Daily Mail to blame
By FaceMaster on 9/8/2008 1:53:36 PM , Rating: 2
For once they've stopped talking about how the youth of today will become violent killers after playing GTA4 have forgotten about how the latest Batman film inspires terrorim and should be banned... and have moved onto the 'Next Wednesday will be the end of the world!!!!1' headline. Forget wars and murders, the Daily Mail is far more dangerous. Fun to read the comments at the bottom as well. Remember to give the site a visit on Thursday- either way you'll WIN!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-105...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-105...




Or ...
By jchamb3 on 9/8/2008 1:56:31 PM , Rating: 2
Perhaps, there'll be a meteric to English glitch causing the Earth to reverse rotation and allowing us to fix past problems ........... or, maybe, not.

What's the name of a good website that discusses physics?




By FreonP on 9/8/2008 2:07:05 PM , Rating: 2
The Real 'Mist'
By Zaidis67 on 9/8/2008 2:07:43 PM , Rating: 2
It may be that too many people have seen the movie, 'The Mist'. Otherwise, this will be bigger than Project Runway!




Atrophy Beware!
By Zaidis67 on 9/8/2008 2:21:54 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, we are already being sucked into a black hole that resides at the center the Milky Way galaxy! How else to explain the atrophic effects on our mental faculties that gave Bush a second term!!




collider
By Curly on 9/8/2008 2:22:14 PM , Rating: 2
We should have had this along time ago. If I remember correctly ours was canceled in 92.




That was good for a giggle..
By zork on 9/8/2008 3:58:52 PM , Rating: 2
First, to all those "t****". I don't here you whining about the hadron collider at CERN. Two, Einstein did not believe in the the existence of Quarks and Leptons and he treated quantum mechanics as a red-headed step child. Three, From what I have seen there isn't enough energy in this collider to even create a black hole at any size.




DAMN YOU ALL TO HELL!
By JoshuaGoshua on 9/8/2008 4:12:21 PM , Rating: 2
Damn scientist ! First that evolution thingy, now you will devoure us with black holes !

Damn you all to hell !




Thank you Dr. Salam
By mildbrew on 9/8/2008 4:38:52 PM , Rating: 2
Thank you Prof. Dr. Mohammed Abdus Salam




By alley on 9/8/2008 6:02:00 PM , Rating: 2
There are other Particle Accelerator's in operation and they haven't caused the earth to be sucked into a black hole so why would this one? Apart from the fact that its much bigger these guys have tested smaller ones so should know what to expect maybe just on a bigger scale.

Also I think its funny that people ring asking if there kids are safe... If your kids get sucked into a black hole you probably will too therefore your really not gonna care because you won't exist anymore. And yes I don't have kids :p




Please don't!!!
By Badgodwand on 9/8/2008 7:14:30 PM , Rating: 2
Please! Please! Please don't do this!

Just kidding.

I am sure that the worst will happen is they give themselves a neurotic headache.




By Codeman03xx on 9/8/2008 9:57:58 PM , Rating: 2
Resonance cascade- Resonance was of an energy “pitch” that causes a phase between dimensions, allowing matter to exist in two realities at once. (Scientist already have proven that multiple dimensions exist and there is at least 4-12 dimensions of which we can not see). Furthermore Black holes were know to have warp like string theory characteristics which could mean even a small hole could infinitely small black hole could (in chaos theory, we have been wrong before) produce any amount of mass in the universe. Finally Cascade a portion is this echo could produced rifts between our world and another dimension. the chances of a "Resonance Cascade" like in the popular video game Half-Life is similar to what the German Chemist Otto Rössler at the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen is sort of talking about. Basically partials colliding quickly will cause a mini black hole with a worst case scenario earth will collapse into it in 4 years.

My take:
kinda creepy to think about but there is no point for this study. I don't think this will happen at this rate but where is the proof. I mean its not like we let Einstein create an atomic bomb with out a lot of Mathematical calculations and proof. So why doesn't LHC show Rossler and the people of the world some proof and mathematics that it will work. This is the problem with the world today the trying to rush things out the door that are useless, but by the way it could end the world in a range between 4-300,000 years. I like when scientists say "everything seems to be in order". Simple fact of it is don't play God, pun intended.




The Big Bang Machine
By ghost101 on 9/9/2008 12:09:22 PM , Rating: 2
Heres a good easy to understand documentary on the LHC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00dccnr/

For non-uk readers:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHs7hu9hgKc&feature...

That's the first part on youtube. Hasn't been forcibly taken down by the BBC yet, so enjoy it while you can.




By Nameerf Nodrog on 9/9/2008 1:04:59 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know about you guys but I am preparing my crowbar!




Brian Cox
By PrinceGaz on 9/9/2008 9:06:00 PM , Rating: 2
I do like Brian Cox, he's a physicist I've seen on a few TV programmes here in Britain, and is a really likeable fairly young guy who knows what he is talking about. He also talked about strangelets as well as micro black-holes on a certain "end-of-the-world" scenario documentary I remember from a few years ago.

However that doesn't automatically make him right, and there is still the possibility the equations we currently use aren't right (string-theory etc is still uncertain about the number of dimensions), so the possibility of the Earth being devoured by a black-hole, or turned into strange-matter can't be ruled out.

The good thing is that if we are wrong about it, once the chain-reaction really takes hold, it will all be over in an instant, and most of us would never have known it was coming. Perhaps over-ambitious physics experiments are the reason there are no alien civilisations more advanced than us we are able to communicate with. Maybe those species with the desire to learn more inevitably eventually expirement with forces whose unforseen consequences destroy them utterly, which is why they are no longer around.

But if we didn't experiment, we'd all be sat at home "posting messages" by making speeches in person in a public-forum, rather than electronically from every country almost instantly.

Besides, tomorrow won't be the end of the world as the LHC will only be run at low power. Oct 21st is scheduled for the first high-power test which is when the world is much more likely to end.




Twat !!
By DjiSaSie on 9/11/2008 7:34:30 AM , Rating: 2
what are you guys talking about?




just...wow
By Armorize on 9/24/2008 5:51:12 PM , Rating: 2
going off topic... i think the comments in this article cover just about ...everything lol




HADRON
By Cape OC on 9/8/2008 12:03:28 PM , Rating: 1
Einstein said "God doesn't play dice with the universe"
(to which Nils Bohrs retorted "who is he to tell God what to do"} But human scientists already have and may be doing it again,though I doubt it. When the first atomic bomb was
detonated in the Nevada desert Oppenheimer and the gang
really did not know whether the chain reaction from the bomb
would stop as a bomb or continue unrestrained and consume the earth.The arrogant,reckless ignorance is astounding,
but then this was a military project.Hadron is not.
Roll them bones!




Black Holes Among Us
By cybilfeet on 9/8/08, Rating: 0
RE: Black Holes Among Us
By Gadgeteer on 9/8/2008 1:36:37 PM , Rating: 1
Black Holes Among Us
By cybilfeet on 9/8/08, Rating: 1
By cybilfeet on 9/8/2008 12:45:08 PM , Rating: 1

Here in the US we already have millions of black holes - we call them "Republicans"!
------------------------------------------------- ---------
Sorry, you've got the identity wrong. Here in the US, we have billions of neutrinos that change their position and identity every few seconds ... we call them "Democrats."


LHC and politics
By acutar on 9/8/2008 1:22:32 PM , Rating: 1
Of course the end of the world is imminent. The LHC (Large Heavily Republican Constituent) will upon being fired up immediately create a post apocalyptic black hole. It will be selective though and only suck in those evil democrats and their fellow travelers! Seriously, though isn't this just another example of human fear coupled with mass ignorance attempting to steer the human race back to the bronze age?




Joanne, this is your last chance....
By emag on 9/8/2008 2:14:20 PM , Rating: 1
The LHC might destroy the world, do you really want to die without dancing the horizontal bop with me?????

Hey, a guy's gotta try

In a serious vein - I look forward to the results. The nearsighted pinheads running the US gov't killed the funding for this.....then put it toward superstion (sorry, I meant faith-based initiatives)




Firing up the HAE (Huge American Expense)
By RDarker on 9/8/08, Rating: -1
By r2d2bum on 9/8/2008 1:30:05 PM , Rating: 2
Who let you out of your cage? This thing is in Europe!


By Heed on 9/8/2008 1:47:09 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
because I only earn $13 dollars and hour and have a four digit mortgage and alot of bills.


You should be mad at yourself for spending foolishly.


By Coriolis on 9/8/2008 2:03:59 PM , Rating: 2
Don't worry, this is a European facility. Ever since the rise of the right-wing big oil and religious fundies also known as Republicans, the US only spends money to invade and occupy. You should be more concerned that our government is spending over eight billion EVERY MONTH on Iraq while they are sitting on over 80 billion in windfall oil profits.


By Tesseract on 9/8/2008 5:15:46 PM , Rating: 2
Last I checked, CERN had spent some 6 billion Swiss Francs on the LHC (excepting detectors). Interestingly, a considerable proportion of that didn't come from America. So, hardly a "huge american expense". America is neither at the centre of the world nor the only country that researches particle physics.


RE: Firing up the HAE (Huge American Expense)
By icanhascpu on 9/8/2008 5:25:39 PM , Rating: 1
Honestly, who are you to talk about 'good investments' ?


By FishOutOfTheWater on 9/9/2008 9:25:38 PM , Rating: 1
If I could i'd find the nearest lake or stream and fill it with a bunch of dead fish, after the first test. That would be biblical. My last words while I hang from a tree, cant take a joke…


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