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Print 13 comment(s) - last by Reclaimer77.. on Aug 5 at 8:41 AM

Five Chinese brands were added instead

Select foreign anti-virus software is getting the boot from China as Beijing signs on more Chinese-branded versions instead.

According to People Daily, both U.S.-based Symantec Corp and Russian-based Kaspersky Lab have been taken off of the list of approved anti-virus software vendors in China. 

However, five Chinese anti-virus software brands were added to the list, including Qihoo 360 Technology Co, Venustech, CAJinchen, Beijing Jiangmin and Rising.

"We are investigating and engaging in conversations with Chinese authorities about this matter," said Kaspersky's Alejandro Arango. "It is too premature to go into any additional details at this time."

This is yet another indication that Beijing is leaning toward the use of local products instead of foreign, mainly due to revelations like that of the U.S. National Security Agency's (NSA) spy programs, which former NSA contractor Edward Snowden disclosed last year. 


Prior to this report, Symantec was already dealing with China's ban on its data loss prevention software. The company was speaking with authorities about it just last month. 

But this isn't the only software battle going on in China right now. Microsoft's Windows 8 operating system was banned from the country because China suspects a too-close-for-comfort type of relationship between Microsoft and the United States government. After the 
NSA revelations, that doesn't sit well with China. 

Despite Microsoft's denial of working too closely with the U.S. government, Windows 8 remains banned in China. The ban was reportedly to ensure computer security after Microsoft ended support for its Windows XP operating system -- still widely used throughout China.

Last week, four Microsoft offices were raided by the State Administration for Industry and Commerce in China as part of an official investigation.  

However, it looks like the Xbox One will still make its way to China starting September 23.

Source: People Daily



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Good call
By Ammohunt on 8/4/2014 3:03:08 PM , Rating: 5
The Symantec Virus is banned anywhere i have a say as well.




RE: Good call
By Motoman on 8/4/2014 3:32:44 PM , Rating: 2
Seconded. And thirded.


RE: Good call
By retrospooty on 8/4/2014 3:35:12 PM , Rating: 3
Throw me in on that... Anything 1/2 as bloaty as Symantec should at least give you 1/2 assed protection... Symantec is useless. Better off with the free MSSE.


RE: Good call
By Labotomizer on 8/4/2014 4:13:55 PM , Rating: 2
NetBackup is good...

Although nothing else they make is good, even if it was before they bought it. Enterprise Vault is the most convoluted, evil piece of software ever written. Who still uses the Windows Message Queues to move data around!?


RE: Good call
By Samus on 8/4/2014 11:39:56 PM , Rating: 2
I'm still surprised how good AVG and Avast are after all these years. Like MalwareBytes, they haven't gotten all crappy how AdAware and Spybot did.

I actually recommend to people all the time to just purchase Malwarebytes for $20/year and use Windows Defender as the basic system-level virus scanner. After all, the majority of threats for the average user are malware, not viruses.


RE: Good call
By Reclaimer77 on 8/5/2014 8:41:51 AM , Rating: 2
That's really all you need unless you're a complete idiot.

Malwarebytes + Windows Defender (Microsoft Security Essentials) plus a weekly scan of ComboFix (greatest thing ever) was my setup for years. Never had a problem.

Siiigh, still no ComboFix version for Windows 8 :(


RE: Good call
By amanojaku on 8/4/2014 3:42:30 PM , Rating: 2
This sheds a whole new light on Russia's demands of Apple.

Putin's trying to fix iTunes for Windows.


By Cypherdude1 on 8/4/2014 3:51:56 PM , Rating: 5
IMHO, they probably are phoning home. Every time any software phones home for any information, it by default gives your IP address and probably other information. Because everyone uses high speed connections now, most IP's do not change. IP's are now as good as your home address.

On a regular basis, my Windows 7 desktop phones home. Just to see what my desktop connects to when I start up, I have SysInternals TCPView start up. For example, on May 18 my Microsoft Windows 7 desktop connected to IP 184.24.25.92, location United States - Akamai Technologies. It sent 4 packets or 897 bytes and received 6 packets or 8,973 bytes. The svchost.exe PID is 332 which are all Microsoft Corporation written programs: BITS, Browser, IKEEXT, iphlpsvc, LanmanServer, ProfSvc, Schedule, SENS, ShellHWDetection, Themes, Winmgmt, wuauserv, AeLookupSvc, MMCSS. It's probably the same number on your Windows 7 SP1 machine.

IMHO, Symantec does the same thing every time you update their anti-virus and firewall software. With Symantec, their NIS and 360 programs phone home every 5 minutes with their Pulse updates. We now know that the USA companies have allegedly allowed the NSA to infect their products, their software, their firmware, with code which allows the NSA to spy on their customers. We now know that the FBI allegedly went to every single tech company and demanded their encryption keys. See the free Frontline documentary "United States of Secrets (Parts One and Two)." This Frontline program is the best I have seen in 10 years. DailyTech does not allow URL's in their posts. Google:
Frontline video pbs org 2365245528
Frontline video pbs org 2365251169
If you create a free PBS account, you can see all their videos in HD.

There are several other documentaries you must see:
1. Inside Job , 2011 Best Documentary Oscar winner
2. We're Not Broke
3. Park Avenue: Money, Power and the American Dream (free)
Google: Park Avenue video pbs org 2296684923
4. Split Estate
5. Gasland I & II




By Dorkyman on 8/4/2014 6:23:41 PM , Rating: 2
Okay, then what about Avast or other freeware/payware AV? All our PCs are on Avast and are very happy with it. Are they phoning home also with additional data?


By althaz on 8/4/2014 11:35:41 PM , Rating: 1
The poster above is a bit of an idiot. Any software that receives updates online, has to send packets out.

An example of the poster's idiocy: He claims svchost is sending things out - which it is doing, because it was asked to by the application running that service. Svchost is a service that applications use. Try googling it (which the poster above clearly did not do).


By Cypherdude1 on 8/4/2014 11:58:59 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
The svchost.exe PID is 332 which are all Microsoft Corporation written programs: BITS, Browser, IKEEXT, iphlpsvc, LanmanServer, ProfSvc, Schedule, SENS, ShellHWDetection, Themes, Winmgmt, wuauserv, AeLookupSvc, MMCSS. It's (PID 332) probably the same number on your Windows 7 SP1 machine.
I did mention all the programs linked to The svchost.exe PID is 332. You failed to understand this.

In addition, if you see the free Frontline documentary "United States of Secrets (Parts One and Two) , it mentions how the NSA is using cookies to track people on the 'Net.


By w1z4rd on 8/5/2014 7:56:33 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
most IP's do not change


is so wrong mate... Static IPs dont change, mine at home changes daily if not more. What, I think, you are trying to say is large companies (MS,Symantec etc) require static IPs as host names dont always resolve(correct me if Im wrong).


Loose loose situation.
By drycrust3 on 8/4/2014 4:32:39 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
According to People Daily, both U.S.-based Symantec Corp and Russian-based Kaspersky Lab have been taken off of the list of approved anti-virus software vendors in China.

My recollection from when I was there is I don't think I saw a computer anywhere in China with either of these antivirus software on them. That said, I suspected most malware would turn off the most popular Chinese antivirus package, which, if my memory is correct, didn't rate very highly in antivirus package tests of the time. I hope things have improved since then.
While there is lots of concern about the American NSA spying on all and sundry, the fact is malware places a huge cost burden on the average Chinese person, and that having decent antivirus packages would be reduce computing costs a lot.




"Paying an extra $500 for a computer in this environment -- same piece of hardware -- paying $500 more to get a logo on it? I think that's a more challenging proposition for the average person than it used to be." -- Steve Ballmer

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