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China defends itself against accusations related to cyber hacking

Shortly after a report indicated Chinese and Russian hackers were accused of targeting the U.S. power grid infrastructure, Chinese officials have vehemently denied the accusations.

"The intrusion doesn't exist at all," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Jiang Yu said during a press conference.  "We hope that the concerned media will prudently deal with some groundless remarks, especially those concerning accusations against China."

China and Russia are blamed for attacking the U.S. electrical grid -- and while no damage was caused, viruses were found inside the network -- a cause for concern since the hackers would have been able to shut off the network whenever they wished.

"There's absolutely no substance in this story about China and Russia attacking the U.S. power grid," Yu added.  "I hope the relevant U.S. press can truthfully handle their reports, particularly about China."

Despite several western nations accusing China of leading organized hacker rings that target western governments, universities, banks and other organizations, the government has denied knowing about the attacks.

Earlier in the month, China again deflected any cyber espionage blame from western nations, saying it's just "another political issue that the West is trying to exaggerate."  Furthermore, China receiving blame for so many political issues by officials in Washington D.C. is just a major case of "China threat" that currently plagues politicians, Chinese officials said.

China also mentioned that it has been the victim of cyber attacks, and is willing to "enhance its cooperation with the international community."

Regardless of what Chinese government officials, western governments and security experts will likely continue to blame China for cyber attacks against governments, universities, banks, and other vital infrastructure across the western world.



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Why would they admit to it?
By Jimbo1234 on 4/9/2009 1:57:59 PM , Rating: 2
Whether they did it or not, do you think they would admit to doing it? This reminds me of the Iraqi minister who was saying that they are defeating the Americans and that the war was nowhere near Baghdad as you could hear the artillery in the background.




RE: Why would they admit to it?
By Moishe on 4/9/2009 2:18:37 PM , Rating: 3
Exactly. The fact is, if they didn't do it, they should be. Any smart country will be continuously building it's means of fighting war in case it needs to use it.

Knowing all that we know, we can be pretty sure they did it (among others), and they should deny it. I respect all of that.


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By quiksilvr on 4/9/2009 2:31:17 PM , Rating: 2
Wait did you just say:

quote:
The fact is, if they didn't do it, they should be.


Um...care to elaborate?


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By b534202 on 4/9/2009 2:43:50 PM , Rating: 2
Same idea as MAD during the coldwar I guess.

I'm sure US can shut down Chinese & Russian infrastructures if we want to too, so as long as no one makes a move, we're all good and my computers will keep running.


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By inperfectdarkness on 4/10/2009 9:56:59 PM , Rating: 2
i take a small token of comfort that you have NOT heard of the US military hacking into foreign countries.

...i'm inclined to believe that means we're good enough at it that we're not getting caught red-handed.


By theapparition on 4/13/2009 11:31:37 AM , Rating: 2
Or with the tightly controlled state media, would you to even expect them to admit it if we did hack?


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By InsaneGain on 4/9/2009 4:49:59 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The fact is, if they didn't do it, they should be. Any smart country will be continuously building it's means of fighting war in case it needs to use it.


So do you also think it would be a good idea for China to secretly rig U.S. electrical power infrastructure with explosives in case "it needs to use" them? Would you "respect all of that"? That could be considered an act of war. What is the difference if potentially catastrophic sabotage is done electronically?


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By omglol on 4/9/09, Rating: -1
RE: Why would they admit to it?
By omglol on 4/9/2009 7:06:39 PM , Rating: 1
someone read my post and down voted it before the page refreshed for me to see?
lol


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By porkpie on 4/9/2009 7:32:16 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
do you also think it would be a good idea for China to secretly rig U.S. electrical power infrastructure with explosives in case "it needs to use" them?
For China at least, it would be a good idea, yes.

Anyway, you're missing the point. Gathering data in a nondestructive manner (aka "spying") is very different than planting bombs...even virus logic-bombs.

China is, from its own perspective, doing nothing wrong by seeing how vulnerable the US electric grid is.


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By Cerberus90 on 4/9/2009 2:21:56 PM , Rating: 2
yeh, we'll never really find out who did it.

Although, if China want to increase their involvement in the defence against cyber attacks, then they would presumbly have more info on the systems used for the defense, and therefore be able to break through these defenses easier.


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By TwistyKat on 4/9/2009 3:01:55 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
eh, we'll never really find out who did it.


If it was even done at all. This story sounds like a "wag the dog" kinda tail.


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By porkpie on 4/9/2009 7:33:41 PM , Rating: 2
Wow, some people see conspiracies inside conspiracies.

There really isn't any doubt this was done. There also isn't any doubt it was done by someone in China. The only thing up in the air is whether the Chinese GOVERNMENT sanctioned it or not.


RE: Why would they admit to it?
By yomamafor1 on 4/10/2009 11:03:24 AM , Rating: 2
Knowing China's government, the chance of them involving in such cyber attack of espionage is 99%. I bet they probably used the "Firewall of China" to actually conduct espionage on other countries.


How?
By AntiM on 4/9/2009 3:16:21 PM , Rating: 5
Why would electric companies have network connections to the cloud anyway? How is it that there's even a mechanism is place for someone to hack into? Is it for remote management? Are they sacrificing security for convenience? All they have to do is cut the wire, problem solved. Why would a power company need an internet connection, especially one that's accessible from China?

Too many questions??




RE: How?
By Beno on 4/9/2009 3:54:24 PM , Rating: 3
my thoughts exactly


RE: How?
By cnar77 on 4/10/2009 4:07:29 AM , Rating: 2
It's called being cheap. Keeping costs down is more important for a lot of companies including power companies so they can increase profits. Only government regulation can prevent this. Either require them to use IPLCs/NPLCs or create their own private networks.

VPNs, firewalls, IDS/IPS are great but something that critical should not be allowed public access. Simply using a leased circuits would minimize the possibility of this occurring. Of course these aren't cheap and as usual people will complain about cost. Personally any equipment dealing with mission critical operations should not be on the wire ... PERIOD.


RE: How?
By porkpie on 4/10/2009 9:53:45 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
Personally any equipment dealing with mission critical operations should not be on the wire
Sorry but that isn't practical in today's environment. To work, a national electric grid needs to communicate over long distances. Power plants, substations, transformers, consumer locations all need to communicate with each other. You want to build an entirely separate "internet" to allow them to do that?


RE: How?
By ThePooBurner on 4/14/2009 1:26:54 PM , Rating: 2
Yes. Security is worth it's cost. I'd rather not have the governor of Georgia unleash a cyber attack that cripples the nation. :)

Bonus points if you know what i am referencing.


In other news
By FITCamaro on 4/9/2009 3:07:57 PM , Rating: 3
I say I never speed so therefore it must be true.




RE: In other news
By superkdogg on 4/9/2009 3:36:16 PM , Rating: 2
That's true. FIT never speeds and neither do I.

Signed,
Russia
quote:
China also mentioned that it has been the victim of cyber attacks


Like the rebel scum who use proxies to get to Google?


RE: In other news
By 67STANG on 4/9/2009 4:19:00 PM , Rating: 2
You drive a Camaro, I believe it. =) j/k.


RE: In other news
By FITCamaro on 4/9/2009 6:23:18 PM , Rating: 1
I drove a Camaro. Now I drive a GTO. ;)

But I will drive a Camaro again someday. Hopefully a 67-69 with a bad ass LSx, 6-speed, 12 bolt with 3.42s, full suspension and brakes, and a redone interior.


RE: In other news
By Whaaambulance on 4/9/2009 6:39:35 PM , Rating: 2
RE: In other news
By theapparition on 4/13/2009 11:34:20 AM , Rating: 2
If you're going 6 speed, the 9" oveer the 12 bolt is a must. Also, since you didn't mention forced induction, go with 4.10's in the rear for a NA setup.


Dont bite the hand that feeds you
By Whaaambulance on 4/9/2009 4:03:50 PM , Rating: 3
It doesn't make sense why China would want to hurt the country that basically supports their economy. Imagine if US consumers never bought any of China's products. Do you think they would be growing at the rate they are now?

I can see if China wanted to get information on the US to keep their info up to date, but I don't think they would want to cause any issues that would affect the economic or financial relationship with the US.




By JackPack on 4/10/2009 12:48:03 AM , Rating: 2
LOL

1. Think carefully about how the U.S. currently pays for Chinese exports.

2. Exports to the U.S. represents a tiny fraction of China's GDP growth. The 300M population is a small slice of the pie when you look at the big picture: China's own domestic consumption and the rest of the industrialized world.


By BansheeX on 4/10/2009 2:32:34 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
It doesn't make sense why China would want to hurt the country that basically supports their economy.


Epic, epic fail.


Huh?
By drycrust on 4/9/2009 3:51:12 PM , Rating: 2
I don't get this. In that case of the New Zealand teenager who was caught after creating a huge botnet, the lad's virus would actually kill off other viruses and competing botnet software. Surely that alone is proof that if these computers were hacked from a foreign country, it probably wasn't done under the control of that government. If a "crim" writes software so as to make a hacked computer run "normally" most of the time, wouldn't it make sense for a foreign intelligence agency to do the same?
After some thought, the presence of viruses is probably proof those foreign countries haven't been hacking those computers ... so maybe they should be checking the software of those utilities and essential services that haven't had any problems.
As else said (and my thanks for the new terminology), this is just another example of "yellow journalism".




RE: Huh?
By porkpie on 4/9/2009 7:37:19 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Surely that alone is proof that if these computers were hacked from a foreign country, it probably wasn't done under the control of that government.
Lol, are you actually trying to say that because the Chinese didn't clean out any viruses on the machines they hacked, that they couldn't have possibly been sponsored by the govt??

Wow. Just wow.


Proof?
By ClownPuncher on 4/9/2009 2:29:14 PM , Rating: 2
If we have proof, then I am willing to believe this, otherwise it sounds like yellow journalism.

But I do think that the Chinese Government would deny involvment in Chinese politics. They have denied pretty much everything ever said about them that was negative.




RE: Proof?
By BruceLeet on 4/9/2009 5:53:15 PM , Rating: 1
Any government would deny anything negative alleged against them.


They know?
By celticbrewer on 4/9/2009 3:09:27 PM , Rating: 2
The report claims Chinese and Russian hackers, not those governments. At least not directly. Does China really know what everyone is doing online? Yeah, they block sites and monitor people all the time, but do they REALLY know that it wasn't one or more of their citizens?

Being #1, you always have a target on your back. And with the propaganda that other countries spew about the evil empire of the USA, who's to say some group of 15 year old wiz kids hasn't taken it upon themselves to see if they could hack US infrastructure. If you were some "hacker" with the talent to do the same, would you hack into Iran's nuclear facilities? I'm betting at least one American out there would try.




RE: They know?
By BruceLeet on 4/9/2009 5:54:56 PM , Rating: 1
You would need some shmerious equipment.

Supplied by the government of course.


Wait China and Russia together?
By Smartless on 4/9/2009 2:30:32 PM , Rating: 2
So are they teaming up against us or were they independent attacks? That would be a frightening scenario if it became a superpower contest. All we need is the Brotherhood of Nod and those C&C guys would have called it.




By Goty on 4/9/2009 6:32:49 PM , Rating: 2
I'm sure that every major power on the planet has SOME kind of backdoor into every other major powers' computer systems that they can manage to get into.




Wink, wink, nudge, nudge...
By Smokey48 on 4/10/2009 1:31:26 AM , Rating: 2
"China Denies Involvement in Hacking U.S. Power Grid"

Ri-i-i-i-i-ght.




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