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Two labs of America's top scientists have fallen for the oldest trick in the hackers' book

DailyTech featured a blog yesterday on how the media frequently reports on so called "hacks" with little understanding of what happened, participating in a irresponsible brand of journalism that borders on alarmism.  The problem is exacerbated in that people really do fall victim to Internet scams, even rather smart ones, which reporters dubiously dub "hacks."

One such report featured on ABC News concluded that two nuclear labs had been "hacked."  The true story is a bit more entertaining and the reveals that there is no threat to the country's nuclear safety.  Real threats such as concerted "hacks" conducted by the Chinese against the U.S. government are certainly a concern, but the only thing dangerous about the compromise at these labs is the stupidity of a few scientists and workers at the plants.

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Los Alamos National Lab in New Mexico have made a habit of collecting the social security numbers, names, and birth dates of scientists who visit the plants.  The information is put into a database, which reads like a who's who of America's top scientists.

Unfortunately, nobody thought such a practice might be a bit insecure.  Starting October 29, workers at the labs began receiving phishing emails, which followed a traditional attack pattern of containing malicious Trojan-containing attachments.  

There is no evidence that the attacks were specifically geared at the lab.  If the attacks were just a general Internet attack, those responsible might have been excited at the big fish they caught.  The two labs both have reported that the phishing emails gained access to their system, which indicates at least two employees -- one at each plant -- were foolish enough to click the attachment and commence the damage.  The result was that the database with the scientists' information was compromised. 

The phishers gained access to the records of all visitors at the plant between 1999 and 2004. 

Don't blame the news networks solely for sensationalizing the attack and making it sound like a sophisticated assault.  Leaders at the labs have gone on record trying to fudge the facts in statements, making the attacks sound more complex than they really are and icing over that the attacks only succeeded due to employee failures.

For example, ORNL director Thom Mason stated that the attacks were, "coordinated attempt to gain access to computer networks at numerous laboratories and other institutions across the country,"  and continued, "Because of the sensitive nature of this event, the laboratory will be unable for some period to discuss further details until we better understand the full nature of this attack."

Los Alamos has been more silent about what appears to prove the old adage that the greatest hole in security on the average computer network is the network's users.

In 2006 Los Alamos fell victim to social engineering and phishing when its emails were stolen and ended up on the USB stick of a drug dealer found in a police raid.  The emails contained data of simulated nuclear weapons tests considered sensitive.

At the time executive director of the Project On Government Oversight (POGO), Danielle Brian blasted Los Alamos for their lax security stating, "This appears to be a new low, even drug dealers can get classified information out of Los Alamos."

Expect more pressure for  ORNL and LANL as the smoke of sensationalism begins to blow away, revealing atrocious security due to user stupidity.  Looks like some of America's top minds have just fallen for the one of the oldest tricks in the hackers' book. 


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By GeorgeOrwell on 12/9/2007 2:06:24 AM , Rating: 2
It is very unlikely that the one big fear that has been programmed into the American people -- the rogue nuclear device/weapon -- is also where all the "hacking" is occurring as well.

A drug dealer having nuclear research facility info is one step away from some other criminal underworld type controlling an actual weapon. Or maybe it is just too much Hollywood.

Obviously the vast array of biological weapons, chemical weapons, high yield conventional weapons, etc., that are available in the US are of no interest to hackers.

Only the nukes. Maybe the hardest to use of all available weapons. Gimme a break.




By Ringold on 12/9/2007 2:43:19 AM , Rating: 2
Or maybe it's just because nobody cares to hear how an intern at a water treatment plant got his SSN stolen, and DailyTech has bills to pay? :)

If you really do care about completely uninteresting news, though, I'd like to report that it's cold outside and I just heard a train pass by.


By Manch on 12/9/2007 6:55:48 AM , Rating: 2
Yeah, the one that goes by my house usually passes by at 2100 & 0200. Just FYI since we're sharing


By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 12/9/2007 3:22:40 AM , Rating: 2
One thing that's important to remember about these labs is that they simulate nuclear explosions on computers -- not in their backyard. Any sort of nuclear program data coming out from these facilities might help Russia make a bigger bomb, but they're probably not going to help the Jihadi looking up how to build the bomb at Starbucks.


By crystal clear on 12/9/2007 7:55:48 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
One thing that's important to remember about these labs is that they simulate nuclear explosions on computers -- not in their backyards


Thats what Iran plans to do-therby they do not have to explode a device.

In this context read the news item below-

December 06, 2007 (Computerworld) -- Despite federal antiterrorism trade sanctions that bar the sale of U.S.-made computer technology to Iran, a computing research center in Tehran claims to have used Advanced Micro Devices Inc.'s Opteron processor to build the Middle Eastern country's most powerful supercomputer.

The Iranian High Performance Computing Research Center (IHPCRC), which is located at Tehran's Amirkabir University of Technology, said in an undated announcement on its Web site that it has assembled a Linux-based system with 216 Opteron processing cores. That's a relatively small supercomputer, with a claimed peak performance level of 860 billion floating-point operations per second, or gigaflops. But the research center said that the system, which will be used for weather forecasting and meteorological research, is the fastest built in Iran to date.

Thacker FZE is an authorized distributor of AMD products that is based in the United Arab Emirates, in the state of Dubai. The company is also listed under the name Sky Electronics on AMD's Web site. Sky Electronics, whose managing director is named Manoj Thacker, says on its Web site that it is a business partner of Intel, Microsoft Corp., Nvidia Corp. and several other technology vendors in addition to AMD.


http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?com...

Its a long article read it for more details on the subject.

The Iranians claims it will be used for weather forecasting and meteorological research, (is the fastest built in Iran to date) is simple deception.

They claim to use 216 Opteron processing cores.
In fact it could be more than that-who knows the exact figure/amount.

The real purpose is to simulate nuclear explosions on this computers .


"A politician stumbles over himself... Then they pick it out. They edit it. He runs the clip, and then he makes a funny face, and the whole audience has a Pavlovian response." -- Joe Scarborough on John Stewart over Jim Cramer

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