backtop


Print 19 comment(s) - last by Hase0.. on Dec 10 at 11:58 AM

Looks like the P2P conspiracy theories won’t get their day in court

LimeWire’s antitrust countersuit was thrown out last week after a federal judge granted the RIAA’s motion to dismiss claims against the company.

Many of the claims were dismissed “without prejudice,” which would allow LimeWire’s parent company, Lime Group LLC, to file new lawsuits under state courts.

Lime Group listed a wide variety of complaints against record labels and the music industry, with the overall theme being that industry execs conspired against LimeWire and others using a variety of schemes to undermine P2P and P2P companies’ efforts to legitimate themselves.

Some of these complaints include:

  • Claims that RIAA labels banded together to exclusively support P2P client iMesh and its acoustic fingerprinting technology, while simultaneously refusing to support a similar hash-based system employed by LimeWire; when Lime Group sought the necessary hashes to employ their technology, RIAA refused, instead demanding that LimeWire acquire the rights to use iMesh’s fingerprinting tech.
  • Further, if LimeWire insisted on using its hashing technology, it would instead have to license a similar hash-based filtering system from Altnet.
  • Music industry joint ventures MusicNet and pressplay – two services that PC World dubbed “25 Worst Tech Products of all Time” due to “stunningly brain-dead features” – were nothing more than conduits for price-fixing and market manipulation. (pressplay eventually became Napster 2.0 after its 2005 acquisition by Roxio.)
  • General claims of “unfair business practices,” including threatening P2P users with litigation, pressuring artists not to license works to P2P companies, and false accusing LimeWire of promoting child pornography and piracy, among other things.

In his ruling, U.S. District Judge Gerald Lynch wrote that most of Lime Group’s claims “fail to allege an adverse effect on competition market-wide.” Additionally, Lynch noted that record labels presented over 100gb of data totaling 29 million pages worth of information for their defense, while LimeWire failed to produce “any additional facts it would plead that would enable it … to demonstrate the existence of a conspiracy.”

Lime Group’s countersuit was filed in response to the RIAA’s lawsuit against the P2P client, which was launched just days after its $100 million legal victory over Kazaa.

RIAA executives applauded Lynch’s ruling, noting that Lime Group’s countersuit was nothing but a diversionary tactic designed to “take attention away from … [the] massive infringement that is the real focus of this case.”



Comments     Threshold


This article is over a month old, voting and posting comments is disabled

RE: Is this too much to ask for?
By Hase0 on 12/10/2007 11:58:17 AM , Rating: 0
wow could you pull shit out of your ass more please, it says that the reason he threw it out is because they failed to provide proof to their claims, while the RIAA provided more then 100gb of defence. Next you'll be screaming DRUG COMPANY R EVILLLSSS, WE NVR WENT 2 M00N and shit like that with out any proof. BTW i use lime wire, so dont think im some RIAA employee.


"This week I got an iPhone. This weekend I got four chargers so I can keep it charged everywhere I go and a land line so I can actually make phone calls." -- Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Related Articles













botimage
Copyright 2014 DailyTech LLC. - RSS Feed | Advertise | About Us | Ethics | FAQ | Terms, Conditions & Privacy Information | Kristopher Kubicki