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AMD plans to keep "Brisbane" around, releases new chips based on it

Things at AMD may have gone from bad to worse with the lackluster Phenom launch in late November.  Not only did Phenom fail to appeal to professional reviewers, but the company ended up removing one third of its CPU lineup just after the big day.

Last week AMD CEO Hector Ruiz vowed that the company would stop hemorrhaging cash and return to profitability soon.  "That is our number one goal right now," Ruiz said in a conference in Bangalore

Making a profit at AMD apparently means refocusing on its older K8 architecture.  The company will introduce eleven 65nm K8 processors over the next two quarters.  By comparison: AMD launched two quad-core K10 Phenom processors in November with three more scheduled over the next two quarters.  Two tri-core Phenom processors will follow in March 2008.

Essentially, AMD will move any remaining Athlon 64 processors from the 90nm node to the 65nm node, with a few new frequency and TDP variations.

The AMD Athlon 64 X2 5600+ will be the first to jump on the new 65nm K8 bandwagon with a 65W TDP. The previous Windsor-based chip of the same featured an 89-Watt TDP. AMD will also add 100 MHz to the core frequency of the Athlon 64 X2 5600+, now rated at 2.9 GHz. Total L2 cache will be halved in the move to the Brisbane core, and the updated Athlon 64 X2 5600+ chips will feature only 1MB of L2 cache. Availability of these processors is scheduled for Q1 2008.

AMD's higher-end Athlon 64 X2 6400+ and Athlon 64 X2 6000+ will both be discontinued.

AMD will also update its "Energy Efficient" series and will release three new chips, the AMD Athlon 4850e, Athlon 4450e, and Athlon 4050e in Q2 2008. All of the new offerings will be based on AMD's Brisbane core and will feature a 45-Watt thermal envelope. AMD's current energy efficient "BE-2xxx" series will be phased out at that time. Respectively, the new chips will run at 2.5GHz, 2.3GHz and 2.1GHz.

All new Brisbane chips will be based on the Socket AM2 interface.  These processors are compatible with AMD's AM2+ socket designated for Phenom processors.


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Since they're still working on the K8...
By joemoedee on 12/5/2007 12:05:54 PM , Rating: 2
Having a better lineup of 939 chips on the market certainly wouldn't hurt them. Or maybe just one or two "high-end" chips that would be affordable upgrades for those with still rather recent PCs.

I'm unsure what the fab difficulties would be, but I know there's a ton of 939 system owners that would jump at the chance to upgrade the cpu in their machine.

As far as the business side goes, it does seem that they're all over the place with what they're doing. I've enjoyed their products, and hope that they can figure it out before its too late.




By RamarC on 12/5/2007 12:28:59 PM , Rating: 2
i completely agree. a lineup of 939 based x2s would sell quite well. a 939 based x2 6000+ could certainly keep some amd old schoolers who are in need of an upgrade from abandoning ship.


RE: Since they're still working on the K8...
By Kazairl2 on 12/5/2007 8:38:34 PM , Rating: 2
If you want to keep with Socket 939, NewEgg still has the Opteron 185 (2.6 GHz, dual-core with 1 MB L2/core) around. Mine just arrived today. The chip is more expensive than the equivalent AM2 chip, but it lets you keep your mainboard and memory. If you have a lower-end 939 CPU, doubling the cores AND increasing the clock frequency isn't a bad upgrade.



By joemoedee on 12/6/2007 8:06:00 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
If you want to keep with Socket 939, NewEgg still has the Opteron 185 (2.6 GHz, dual-core with 1 MB L2/core) around.


Yeah, I saw that. 169.99 for the Opteron 180, 235.00 for the Opteron 185. However for 99.99, you can get into a 4800+ X2 Brisbane core on the AM2 platform. They need similar 939 products available at similar price points, and I believe that would increase their sales quite a good bit. But again, I'm unsure of the fabrication issues that may entail.

Up until mid 2006, I know I saw still about a 50/50 split on the AM2 vs 939 sales where I worked. Most system sales were AM2, but most CPU sales were 939. The majority of 939 systems out there are PCI-e and SATA, and a lot of folks dropped a good amount of DDR Ram in when it was inexpensive.

A nice affordable dual core upgrade from their single core, and they're set for at least a year if not more. (Depending on their usage)

For me personally, I'm in a 754 still. (Talk about a lack of CPU upgrades available there!) So my next upgrade will be a full one, and it's hard to consider AMD this time around when Intel is offering such good bang for the buck. I sincerely hope they figure all this out, as I've been a strong supporter of their products since the 5x86/133 CPU.


"We don't know how to make a $500 computer that's not a piece of junk." -- Apple CEO Steve Jobs

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