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AMD guidance details the backwards and forwards compatibility of the AM2, AM2+ and AM3 sockets.  (Source: AMD)

AMD details its platform progression identically to Intel's "tick-tock" architecture roadmap.  (Source: AMD)
AMD announces its Spider Platform in what could be its biggest launch of all time

Tomorrow marks the launch of AMD's platform launch, codenamed Spider. The launch consists of three components: AMD Phenom processors, the ATI Radeon HD 3800 graphics processor and AMD 7-Series desktop chipsets.

The first new AMD desktop architecture in four years will debut with the Phenom 9500 and Phenom 9600. Both chips feature a 95-Watt thermal envelope and a shared 2MB L3 cache.

The AMD Phenom 9600 ships with a 2.3GHz operating frequency, while the Phenom 9500 features a slightly lower 2.2GHz clock. Both processors run on HyperTransport 3.0 and feature a total 2MB L2 cache; 512KB per core. The chips also come with an integrated DDR2 memory controller and support speeds up to the DDR2-1066 specification, which is still pending JEDEC approval.

Directron.com carries the Phenom 9600 at a retail price of $322.00 and the Phenom 9500 at $286.00.

AMD guidance originally stated that a 2.4GHz Phenom, dubbed the Phenom 9700, would also launch on November 19, however last minute roadmap updates indicate this chip will come in December instead.

These two Phenom processors are part of AMD's first-generation, 65nm Stars family. In the second-half of 2008 AMD will announce its second-generation Stars family, which will be a migration of the current K10 core to the 45nm node.

The second-gen Stars lineup consists of five variants, including quad-core Deneb, dual-core Propus, dual-core Regor and single-core Sargas. The second-generation Stars CPUs will also include an integrated DDR3 memory controller, a first for AMD.

AMD's Spider Platform launch also includes the official announcement of its ATI Radeon HD 3800 Series. The launch of the Spider platform will add two new video cards to AMD's lineup, the ATI Radeon HD 3870 and Radeon HD 3850. 

AMD's new Radeon series received overwhelmingly positive feedback during AMD's November 15 media event.  Newegg representatives tell DailyTech the company sold out all of its stock on the first day, but is quickly replenishing inventory.

To round off the launch of the platform, AMD also announced its 7-Series desktop chipsets. The AMD 790FX targets the ultra-enthusiast market segment, and corporate guidance sets the retail price of 790FX boards between $150-250. Several partners already announced boards supporting this new chipset earlier this year.

AMD designates the AMD 790X as its performance chipset, slotted just below the 790FX.  AMD guidance states this chipset will run the consumer between $99-150.  The mainstream AMD 770 chipset will not see store shelves for several months, but AMD claims this chip will round off the mainstream segment for AMD chipsets. 


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RE: Any 'experts' out there?
By SilthDraeth on 11/18/2007 11:09:54 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
If it was on the same die, but not 'onboard the chip', it would probably communicate with HyperTransport instead of PCIe2.0. There's no real need for a graphics card to do this, otherwise AMD would probably be pushing for it.


Actually AMD is pushing for, and designing that. It is called AMD Fusion.
http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20061119-8250...
Is one article talking about it.


RE: Any 'experts' out there?
By Zurtex on 11/18/2007 11:31:08 PM , Rating: 2
My understanding was the main aim of fusion was really to explore all possible co-processors by allowing intercommunicating through HyperTransport.

The on-die graphics wouldn't be full graphic card power, put something strong enough to at least run a full 3D GUI / HD Acceleration. Sort of a stepping stone to a future I was describing. But I could be wrong, I've not looking in to it too much recently.


RE: Any 'experts' out there?
By Targon on 11/19/2007 8:25:10 AM , Rating: 2
There was a slot type for this called HTX which would allow for add-in cards that would communicate via HyperTransport, but it was under-hyped and seems to have died.

AMD has promoted the idea of having different processors that are socket compatible with the CPU, so if you take a 4 socket system, you could put two CPUs in, a PPU(Physics Processing), and a GPU chip into the system, or you could go with 3 CPUs and one GPU, or add other co-processors to provide whatever abilities you might want to see.

A problem with putting a GPU on a straight chip that goes into the motherboard is that video standards are changing too rapidly for this to be a good idea. You have DisplayPort, HDMI 1.3, Dual-link DVI, plus there will be new versions of these connection types out by the time R&D had the chance to release a new motherboard that supported the old standards for video.

If you look at how quickly GPU technology is improving, it seems almost foolish to go with integrated video these days because in the time it takes from the chipset release to motherboard release, a new low-end GPU comes out that allows for $50 video cards that makes the old ones look like garbage.

A HyperTransport connected video card makes the most sense, but would require video card manufacturers to support a new standard that may or may not survive. Look at what happened to Microchannel(old IBM PS/2 days) and VLB(Vesa Local Bus). There would also need to be a real benefit to the technology since something good on paper means nothing if real-world performance doesn't help. Then you have the support end from AMD where the new slot type would need to be properly supported(game players MUST be able to run their games, and problems with video cards not being recognized because they are not PCI-Express are a valid concern.


RE: Any 'experts' out there?
By MGSsancho on 11/19/2007 8:22:01 PM , Rating: 2
there are FPGAs that can fit. well its really a FGPA on a tiny board that has pins that fits in the slot.

There are infiniband as well as 10gbit Ethernet chips that use the HT bus. I think myranet but I am probably wrong on that. either way its mostly HPC and nothing us mortals really ever see.


RE: Any 'experts' out there?
By murphyslabrat on 11/20/2007 9:31:56 AM , Rating: 3
quote:
My understanding was the main aim of fusion was really to explore all possible co-processors by allowing intercommunicating through HyperTransport.

No, you're thinking of the Torrenza Initiative. Fusion is the idea of integrating a GPU-like co-processor onto the die, itself.

And, as AMD has been feign to let go, it would be far from an exclusively graphical utility. This kind of parallel co-processor could potentially alleviate some bottlenecks in certain applications.


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