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Steve Ballmer would like to welcome Android OS to "Microsoft's World  (Source: Microsoft)
Ballmer has some more interesting insight into looking at the world through Microsoft-colored glasses.

At a recent Tokyo press conference, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer had some interesting things to say about Google and its new Android OS, the mobile phone OS that Google has in development.

Ballmer has a penchant for colorful remarks; for example. he recently likened his relationship with Microsoft founder and good friend Bill Gates to a marriage which has produced many, many children.

Ballmer was at it again, raining harsh criticism on Google, dismissing Android OS as nothing but a press release.

He also stated that he would like to welcome Google into "Microsoft's world," apparently referring to the mobile phone market.

He said, "Right now they have a press release, we have many, many millions of customers, great software, many hardware devices and they're welcome in our world."

His remarks seem slightly curious as Microsoft is dominated in market share of the mobile phone market by the more widespread Symbian OS.

Ballmer refused to comment on the Android software itself, instead simply sticking to a general critique of Google policy.  He said that he felt that Android OS was vaporware at the present and could not be compared to Microsoft's mobile phone OS, Windows Mobile.

"Well of course their efforts are just some words on paper right now, it's hard to do a very clear comparison [with Windows Mobile]," he said.

Perhaps he might be able to comment soon, as Google has released a concrete initial version of its Software Development Kit for the Android OS, something that competitor Apple Inc., still has been unable to do for the iPhone due to alleged security issues.  Google also spread even more love by offering a $10 million USD bounty for "Cool Apps" from third parties for the platform.

Ballmer says he is not threatened by Google, but that Microsoft is watching them like a hawk.

"So we have great momentum, we've brought our Windows Mobile 6 software to market, we're driving forward on our future releases and we'll have to see what Google does," said Ballmer.

Google's Android OS is based on Linux and is under a modified open-source Apache license.  It is being co-developed by "the Open Handset Alliance," which includes industry giants such as T-Mobile, Sprint Nextel, Samsung Electronics, and LG Electronics.

Google's Android OS generated a tremendous amount of buzz in the online community months before its true nature was unveiled.

Ballmer is not the only one who has been making comments deriding Android OS.  Symbian OS CEO Nigel Clifford, also made a similar remark at a Tokyo press conference several days prior.

"One of the reactions [to Android OS] is, it's another Linux platform," Clifford stated. "There's 10, 15, 20, maybe 25 different Linux platforms out there. It sometimes appears that Linux is fragmenting faster than it unifies."

Whether Android OS will be a hit or miss remains to be seen, but it appears to be making competitors slightly antsy and generating some new interesting comments to add to Microsoft's colorful public relations history.



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RE: Who cares about the article...
By memex on 11/14/2007 3:22:44 PM , Rating: 2
The Android platform is using the same open API strategy as Facebook. Form a community by allowing developers access to the APIs, this openness strategy is bound to push innovation & competition in ways we have yet to see. I know with the prize money now being an incentive something good has to come out of it! All it takes is for one of the US cell carriers to get a surge in customers because of a Google-phone/OS and the others will soon follow.


RE: Who cares about the article...
By TomZ on 11/14/2007 3:27:16 PM , Rating: 2
Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way in the cell phone market. The big providers basically decide what kinds of phones to offer to customers. Obviously customers will decide which of those models will be more successful than others.

But it's certainly not a grassroots-type super-democratic situation like the Internet/Facebook. The barriers to entry in the cell phone service market are so large as to make it to where there are just a relatively few big players calling all the shots. This is unlike the Internet where anyone can put up a web site/service with little cost of entry.


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