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Print 105 comment(s) - last by sprockkets.. on Nov 21 at 2:03 AM

Drivers will be able to change their vehicle color at the flip of a switch

Nissan is truly doing wonderful things in the automotive arena. The company recently unveiled its highly-anticipated 2009 GT-R. The vehicle pumps out an impressive 473 HP and an equally impressive 434 lb-ft of twist from its twin-turbocharged 3.8-liter V6 engine.

Now that development is winding down for what is likely Nissan's most advanced road car ever, the Japanese-based company is turning its attention to more "mundane" matters when it comes to choosing a vehicle: color.

Choosing a color when purchasing a new vehicle can be a gut-wrenching endeavor. Many cars look good in black, but the color is a pain to keep clean. Silver often best shows off the curves of a vehicle, but everyone chooses silver these days. Pick a color like beige, and you'll blend in with the rest of the anonymous Toyota Camrys darting in and out of traffic with the right blinker still on.

Nissan hopes to give car buyers the ability to choose whatever color they like for their vehicle -- at any time. Nissan has developed what it calls a "paramagnetic" paint coating -- a unique polymer layer which features iron oxide particles is applied to the vehicle body. When an electric current is applied to the polymer layer, the crystals in the polymer are then interpreted by the human eye as different colors.

Depending on the level of current and the spacing of the crystals, a wide gamut of colors can be selected by the driver. However, since a steady current is needed to maintain the color effect, the paramagnetic paint doesn't work when the vehicle is turned off -- instead, the vehicle would revert back to a default white color.

If you may recall, Ford offered a similar paint option on its mid-90s Mustang GT and Cobra (Mystic) and 2004 Mustang Cobras (Mystychrome). In both cases, the vehicle appeared to be either green or purple depending on the viewing angle.

Nissan is hard at work on the paramagnetic paint and hopes to have it on production vehicles by 2010.

Paramagnetic paint isn't the first time that Nissan had ventured into ways to improve paint technology. The company also developed a self-healing "Scratch Guard Coat" to apply vehicle paint. Thanks to the advanced coating, vehicle are nearly impervious to superficial scratches caused by carwash brushes, fingernails or other minor surface scratches.

Any scratches that are made on the vehicle are "healed" within one day to a week depending on the depth of the scratch.

Nissan's Scratch Guard Coat is currently available on the 2008 Infiniti EX35 luxury crossover utility vehicle.



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RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By InsaneGain on 11/9/2007 1:03:26 PM , Rating: 1
I knew twist was referring to torque without a second thought, considering torque and the inertia of the car are applying a twisting force to the drive shaft.
I'm surprised this wouldn't occur immediately to anyone, and I'm surprised this subject was even brought up. I'm thinking it is more likely that some people are sticklers for technically correct details and are more than a little retentive in the anal region.


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By Martimus on 11/9/2007 1:27:15 PM , Rating: 3
Wow, good for you.

I have never used the term "twist" when working on motors. We measured torque, but never "twist". I asked if it was torque, because of the units he used. It also makes some sense since torque is sort of the twisting force of the shaft. But in the few years that I was an automotive engineer, I never heard anyone refer to the torque output as "twist".

As for your surprise, I am even more surprised that you took offense to my question of what he meant by "twist". I am sorry that I didn’t know the slang that he used for that unit of measure. I guess being ignorant and anally retentive are equivalent in your eyes.


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By jtemplin on 11/9/2007 2:29:05 PM , Rating: 3
Martimus, what he just said was pretty much my first thought at seeing that comment. Many people who would be trying to sarcastically flame the author would post a comment just as you did, with no supporting details. You claim ignorance, but you ask is it similar to torque? How you can pretend to be ignorant when you seemed to realize the authors intention? What number always follows HP and might be characterized as a twisting force? And your negative attitude
quote:
Wow, good for you.
quote:
I guess being ignorant and anally retentive are equivalent in your eyes.
doesn't exactly exonerate you.

If you were truly naive and curious I find it hard to believe you would lose your cool so easily...


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By Martimus on 11/9/2007 2:51:16 PM , Rating: 4
You find it difficult to believe that an insult would make someone lose their cool? I kind of doubt that. I asked if it was like torque because of the units (lb-ft) that he used. I said that in my response. I am not sure what I would need to be exonerated for, but then I didn't understand why someone would insult me for asking a question to the author in the first place. I guess it is best to act omniscient and go look up the answer somewhere else, but I thought it was prudent enough to ask the person who actually said it what he meant.


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By bigboxes on 11/9/2007 4:14:38 PM , Rating: 2
Twist just sounds ignorant. Why not use torque? It's a word that is not too hard to spell and is the appropriate word to use. For the record, I have never (until now) heard the word twist as a synonymn for torque.


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By Etsp on 11/13/2007 3:12:25 PM , Rating: 2
Why are you asking him? he isn't the one that used the term twist. he was asking if the term twist referred to torque


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By aeroengineer1 on 11/10/2007 1:01:06 PM , Rating: 2
I guess that aerospace engineers are smarter than automotive engineers because I understood perfectly what the author was trying to say. Don't be an idiot and and continue to defend a question which was meant to make you seem superior to the author because of your engineering knowledge.

Aeroengineer


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By Martimus on 11/10/2007 3:59:57 PM , Rating: 2
Superior? Right, because my question made me sound like I was trying to seem superior.
quote:
What is twist? Is that similar to torque?
That sounds SO condescending. Why on Earth why I want to sound superior to someone I have never met, and never plan to meet? And who would I sound superior too? A bunch of anonymous jack-asses like you? What would that accomplish? Would I get some magical crown, and be king of the jack-asses? I mean honestly, did you even think before you put down this completely baseless opinion on the net? This is why I usually avoid posting on forums, because I let trolls like you get me upset, and I feel the need to respond. I hate it because truly HATE arguments that include insults, and I really don't want to have one in a public forum. Quit trying to insult me because I had the audacity to ask for an explanation of a piece of jargon I didn't understand. I have never considered myself a smart man, but that won't stop me from asking about things I don't understand. Stop being so smug and looking down on me because you understand something I don't. I doubt anyone who reads any of this cares how smart you think you are, so just be polite so you don't make yourself sound like an idiotic ass.


RE: 434 lb-ft of twist
By Martimus on 11/10/2007 4:05:28 PM , Rating: 2
Aeroengineer; I am sorry for being a little upset after reading your comment. I am sorry if I insulted you with that response. I should have just let it go.


“And I don't know why [Apple is] acting like it’s superior. I don't even get it. What are they trying to say?” -- Bill Gates on the Mac ads

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