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PlayStation 3 recorded by Guinness for distributed computing achievement

In a move that will surely make both the research community and Sony smile, Guinness Worlds Records officially recognized the PlayStation 3 Folding@home network as the most powerful distributed computing network in the world. More than 670,000 PS3 consoles partook in the Folding@home program on September 21, making up a combined petaflop in overall computing power.

"To have Folding@home recognized by Guinness World Records as the most powerful distributed computing network ever is a reflection of the extraordinary worldwide participation by gamers and consumers around the world and for that we are very grateful," said Vijay Pande, Associate Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University and Folding@home project lead.

"Without them we would not be able to make the advancements we have made in our studies of several different diseases. But it is clear that none of this would be even remotely possible without the power of PS3, it has increased our research capabilities by leaps and bounds," added Pande.

"To have PS3 play such a large role in allowing Folding@home to be honored by Guinness World Records is truly incredible," said Masayuki Chatani, Executive Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, Technology Platform, Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. "This record is clear evidence of the power of PS3 and the contributions that it is making to the Folding@home network, and more importantly, scientific research."

The Folding@home program runs simulations in protein folding, helping scientists to understand – and hopefully curing – diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and certain forms of cancer.

Since joining Stanford University’s Folding@home program in March, the PlayStation 3 has led all processors in sheer productivity numbers.


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Question
By Sylar on 11/13/2007 9:40:29 AM , Rating: 2
Since I don't know much about F@H, anyone care to explain if it is making any progress with all the contributors to this project. I understand the basic principle of how it works but how far off are we to finding cures to diseases based on the data obtained? The project was launched years ago, have they made any discoveries since?

Thanks




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