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Samsung 2.5" SATA II Solid State Drive sample  (Source: Samsung)
Samsung cranks up the speeds of its solid-state drives

Solid-state disks (SSDs) are seen as the next plateau for mobile computing. Companies like Alienware and Dell offer the high-performance drives in their notebook computers and end-users can add SSDs to their own notebooks thanks to online retailers like Newegg.

Samsung first starting making waves in the SSD arena with its 32GB drive in March 2006 and followed up with a faster 64GB unit in June of 2007. Today, Samsung is once again stepping up its efforts in the SSD arena.

The company has announced a new generation of 64GB SSDs which use 8Gb, 50nm single-level-cell (SLC) flash memory chips. The drives, which will be available in 1.8" and 2.5" form-factors, also feature a new SATA II interface for faster performance.

The faster chips and SATA II interface gives the new SSDs sequential write speeds of 100MB/sec and sequential reads of 120MB/sec. These numbers completely obliterate the previous Samsung 64GB offering which is rated at 45MB/sec write and 65MB/sec read. Samsung's first-generation 32GB SSD is rated for 30MB/sec writes and 53MB/sec reads.

"The 64GB SATA II SSD is based on Samsung’s cutting-edge NAND technology with dramatically improved performance specs that are taking system performance to a whole new level of efficiency," stated Samsung director of NAND flash marketing Jim Elliott.

Samsung's new SSDs also now compare favorably with Mtron's family of SSDs which are available in 2.5" and 3.5" form-factors. Those drives feature write speeds of 90MB/sec and read speeds of 120MB/sec.

Samsung is currently sampling the new SATA II SSDs and production examples should follow in early 2008.


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Is it just me or has SSD development seemed slow?
By Hulk on 11/5/2007 11:44:14 AM , Rating: 2
The memory technology has been around for a long time. The memory itself been relatively inexpensive for a year or so. But we still don't have reasonably price and fast solid state drives. It looks like this could be the opening of the floodgates if the price it right (or close to right).




RE: Is it just me or has SSD development seemed slow?
By MFK on 11/5/2007 12:05:30 PM , Rating: 3
Yes, it could perhaps be said that the SSD development is moving slow.
I think its because the demand is just not there for a drive that is so robust. Okay so maybe the people who have alot of extra cash lying around might spend it to get this uber robust drive, but I, the average techie, will probably not be buying an SSD for a couple of years to come.
Make no mistake, I've lost enough data as a result of hard drive failures and yes I too on occasion happen to fumble with and drop my laptop. But, as I'm sure many people would agree, the price just isn't right, especially when compared to the per gigabyte cost of the average platter based hard drives.


By Gul Westfale on 11/5/2007 12:36:36 PM , Rating: 2
jesus those are some fast write speeds.. i hope those are the actual speeds though, not what is theoretically possible through the interface using a small on-board buffer.

by the time they become affordable they will be much faster though :)


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