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Print 45 comment(s) - last by ramas.. on Nov 9 at 5:14 AM


HP's MediaSmart Home Server  (Source: Hewlet-Packard)

Iomega HomeCenter Server  (Source: Iomega)
Microsoft's Windows Home Server hardware products are finally ready for prime time

It's been nearly a year since Microsoft first announced its Windows Home Server platform, but we are now just starting to see the fruits of Microsoft's (and its hardware partners') labors.

Microsoft is aiming to make digital media sharing, automated network PC backups and anywhere access to network files a possibility with Windows Home Server. The platform, which is built in Windows Server 2003 technology, is robust, yet easy enough for consumers to jump right in and feel at home.

Likewise, third-party software companies have the ability to create plug-ins for power users that wish to use the Windows Home Server to the fullest extent. According to Microsoft, 35 plug-ins are already available for the platform which touches on blogging, home security and home automation among other things.

The actual Windows Home Server OEM software has been available for a little over a month now, but Microsoft and its launch partners are finally ready to break out the details on the hardware products.

HP's MediaSmart Server is the headliner product for Windows Home Server. As detailed in an earlier DailyTech story, the MediaSmart Home Server is available in two versions: the $599, 500GB EX470 and the $749, 1TB EX475. Both are based on the AMD LIVE! Home Media Server solution.

"We are excited to work with industry leaders HP and Microsoft to help pioneer a new class of user-friendly consumer electronics for home networking," said Bob Brewer, corporate VP of marketing and strategy for the AMD Computing Solutions Group. "The AMD LIVE! solution was designed to simplify and enhance digital entertainment experiences, and helping consumers protect their valuable digital memories is a vital aspect of that vision."

"As more and more entertainment content goes digital, people increasingly want a simple way to access, store and enjoy the wide range of photos, personal videos, music and films they enjoy at home," continued HP Managed Home Business senior VP John Orcutt.

HP, however, isn't the only company championing the Windows Home Server platform. Storage company Iomega is onboard with its 500GB Iomega HomeCenter Server which is scheduled to ship in early 2008. Fujitsu Siemens will offer its 1TB SCALEO Home Server 1900 in late 2007 and other solutions are on the way from Life|ware, MAXDATA, Medion, Tranquil and Velocity Micro.

"Digital devices and content are everywhere in our day-to-day lives and they are more important all the time," said Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates. "With the launch of Windows Home Server, Microsoft and its partners are creating a new consumer product category that will help people keep their digital media safe and make it easier for them to enjoy it with friends and family."



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RE: i have a bad feeling about this
By RamarC on 11/5/2007 10:11:12 AM , Rating: 2
i know it doesn't replace the router, but lots of folks don't even setup their router properly. that's why i'm questioning it security and ease-of-use.

the home sever's web server is internet facing. it also has an rdp gateway that can give remote desktop access to your pcs. for someone who doesn't know what they're doing, granting web access and rdp access can open up a huge can of worms in their home network.


RE: i have a bad feeling about this
By TomZ on 11/5/2007 10:16:08 AM , Rating: 5
The server is based on IIS6 which has historically been pretty secure. In addition, there are tons of IIS6-based web sites on the Internet. (I would guess that DT is one of them.)


By omnicronx on 11/5/2007 11:50:36 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
but lots of folks don't even setup their router properly
And this has to do with home server how? If you did not set up your router correctly, then you would have the same security issues without home server.
quote:
for someone who doesn't know what they're doing, granting web access and rdp access can open up a huge can of worms in their home network.
Pick one, either they setup their router with security or they didn't. Someone who does not know how to setup a router, also does not know how to forward ports or set their server to DMZ host. Thus there would be no external remote desktop, or httpd access.

Windows home server is suppose to work behind the router, and is not really a gateway, unless you specifically set it up that way.


RE: i have a bad feeling about this
By SavagePotato on 11/5/2007 12:22:51 PM , Rating: 2
I work for an ISP, we have customers that don't know they have a router, or even forget they have a router much less know what it is, or how to configure it.

Chances are however someone of that technical proficiency isn't going to be tackling the idea of having their own file server.

Again for someone that doesn't know what their doing, setting up web access to their network probably isn't going to happen anyway.


By Screwballl on 11/5/2007 1:05:39 PM , Rating: 2
I work for an ISP and I know exactly how that is... this is a product I believe most of them will not typically use.


"There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere." -- Isaac Asimov














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