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A new survey shows that the majority of people are willing to do their part to help the environment, even if it isn't easy

A new poll by BBC News provides perhaps the most comprehensive to date look at the current level of public awareness of environmental issues and public initiative to make sacrifices in hopes of fixing them.

The large study surveyed 22,000 people in 21 countries, including many in the two largest CO2 polluters, the U.S. and China.  Four out of five people stated they would probably be ready to make lifestyle changes to reduce emissions.

Taxes were a bit stickier issue.  Taxes on oil and coal enjoyed a smaller base of support, but still represented the majority opinion, with 50% for them and 44% opposed.  Many of the opposed stated that they would change their opinion to support if it could be guaranteed that the funds would be diverted to finance alternative energy or alternative energy research.

The total figures were that 83% of people either were ready or were probably ready to make sacrifices in their daily lives to help the environment.

People in the U.S. and Europe agreed that fuel prices would have to rise in order to get people to lower their consumption, as they are stuck in their ways.

Italy and Russia did not agree, as these countries are already experiencing dramatically fossil fuel costs.

South Korea, India, and Nigeria also showed smaller margins of support for higher energy costs, though the majority of responders still felt that higher costs would be needed to lower consumption.

Interestingly the Chinese were the most willing to support taxes on polluting fossil fuels.  A whopping 85% of Chinese surveyed supported taxes on fossil fuels to reduce reliance on them.

While experiencing many recent quality concerns, including tainted cancer drugs, China has been rapidly becoming a world leader in many technology sectors.  The results of this survey demonstrate that despite past problems the Chinese people have a strong desire for their country to develop into an environmental leader.

In total 22,182 people were interviewed in the following countries:

UK, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Egypt,France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, thePhilippines, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, and the United States.

Interviews occurred either face to face or via telephone between May 29 and July 26, 2007.

Increased public awareness can be attributed to a broad array of sources.  One is the mass media -- news channels have been increasing their environmental issue coverage.  Another source of awareness is simple observation. People see pictures of rainforests stripped bare and it becomes blatantly obvious the need to protect our planet.  The U.N. also can take some credit for its constant climate research, as well as research into other environmental topics, such as deforestation and biofuels

A little credit even can go to recent Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Al Gore, whose movie "An Inconvenient Truth" brought an increased public interest in environmental issues.

Regardlessly of who convinced these people that helping the environment was a good idea, that is the conclusion they have come to.  It appears that the majority of people finally are ready and eager for environmental change -- politicians listen up, these are thoughts of your constituents.


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Why get government involved?
By Schrag4 on 11/6/2007 11:52:00 AM , Rating: 2
Maybe I'm incredibly naive, but I've always felt that once the initial costs of a lot of energy reduction technologies come down a bit, I'd be willing to switch, and I think many others, including big businesses, will too. One example would be a switch to LED lighting. As far as I know, the production and disposal of LED lights isn't hazardous to the environment (like some other 'green' technologies). But good LED lights, from what I'm told, are EXTREMELY expensive. Once they come down to 10 times the price of traditional filament bulbs, I'll replace all my lights, because in the 'medium' run (not just the long run), I'll save tons of money by using less electricity and not buying replacement bulbs. This is just one example.

What I'm getting at is that once these energy saving techs become cheap enough, nobody's going to stick with the old, more expensive technologies. So why should we tax people for using (what will become) more expensive, old technology? Is it just to get money for R&D for these new, energy saving technologies? I have the mind-set that government involvement can only mess things like this up, by causing shortages that raise prices for all kinds of things, like ethanol (in the US) is doing for just about all of our food. $4.00 a gallon for milk. Yikes! Now I have to decide whether my kids will have strong bones or go to college. I'm only joking, of course, but can you see why I don't want the government involved?




RE: Why get government involved?
By Moishe on 11/6/2007 2:09:08 PM , Rating: 2
It's not about saving the environment... it's about power.
Power to control what people do. Power to take people's money. The environment is just a tool to gain power.

Who cares about your kids when there could be a dying Glossy Ibis somewhere? I'm being sarcastic of course, but that's the general attitude.

I think you're right about making it cheaper. The majority of people are not against saving the environment, but they ARE against saving the environment "at all cost" or at the cost of their own freedom. If you give me efficient energy at a slightly higher rate then I'm willing to put up the dough to make sure we're not polluting. If not, then you're just asking me to give something up for something you believe in.

See, this is not a solution, it's a step back. It's humans taking "one for the team". A real solution would offer an alternative energy form that allows humanity to progress and reduces pollution.


"Let's face it, we're not changing the world. We're building a product that helps people buy more crap - and watch porn." -- Seagate CEO Bill Watkins

















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