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Sony XEL-1 OLED HDTV  (Source: Sony)
Sony says OLED HDTVs could see America stores this year depending on Japanese demand

Many home theater enthusiasts have high hopes for OLED technology -- hopes that not only will OLED HDTV sets require less power but that they also will be significantly thinner and provide better color reproduction and image quality.

Engadget is reporting that Sony Electronics President Stan Glasgow revealed in talks this morning with journalists at the Sony Club in New York that, “OLED could come (to the U.S.) before the end of the year." The catch is that OLED HDTVs coming to America is dependent on the demand in Japan and panel supply. In other words if Sony’s OLED XEL-1 is a big hit in Japan, we won’t be seeing them this year in America.

Sony announced its 3mm thick XEL-1 OLED HDTV almost exactly one month ago to lustful stares from home theater fans around the world. The screen size was small at 11-inches and the price was high at about $1744 USD. The Sony XEL-1 OLED TV left many outside Japan reaching for their wallets only to be told the TV wasn’t available outside Japan.

There have been several other announcements in the OLED arena recently with Toshiba announcing that it would have 30-inch OLED HDTVs on the market by 2009. Toshiba, however, stated that the problem with OLED technology was that the method for producing the OLED panels was immature accounting for the increased cost and longer lead times before panels were available.

Just last week Samsung’s Executive Vice President and CTO, Ho Kyoon Chung, unveiled its roadmap for OLED products. Samsung expects to have 40 to 42-inch OLED panels on the market by 2010.

While Toshiba and Samsung make promises to get OLED HDTVs into the hands of consumers, Sony is actually doing it.


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RE: Panel lifetimes?
By barjebus on 11/2/2007 12:28:51 PM , Rating: 2
OLED beats LCD and Plasma in every aspect except for the life of the TV itself. It's still being developed and hasn't even entered mass production yet, so there's bound to be significant improvements in the next three years. Doesn't everyone remember how LCD's lost pixels and Plasma's would get burn in? Oh yeah, thats right, they FIXED those problems.

OLED gives a more vivid, truer color with a wider range of color due to individual per-pixel shading. The contrast ratio and response time are bar none, and to boot it's flat, elegant, can be rolled up or printed using an ink jet printer onto any proper surfaces, AND consumes a minuscule amount of power compared to Plasma and LCD because the technology powers each pixel individually rather than the entire TV all the time.

This will be particularly helpful for the Aussie's since their government recently introduced legislation (not sure if it passed?) limiting the power consumption of TV sets, and the industry has not responded very well with low power usage units.

I really don't know how you can believe OLED don't have anything to offer.


By drank12quartsstrohsbeer on 11/2/2007 5:55:07 PM , Rating: 2
"I really don't know how you can
believe OLED don't have anything
to offer. "


My point was that it doesn't have anything to offer RIGHT NOW.

I've read about the ink jet printing, high contrast, superior color, fast response, high pixel density, roll-it-up and put it in your pocket claims for oled. And i hope they pull it off.

But they haven't... yet.
And dang it, I want a 200dpi 40 inch monitor for my computer that is 1/4 inch thick and used 1 watt of power that I can buy for $100.00. I just don't know how long i will have to wait.


"Well, there may be a reason why they call them 'Mac' trucks! Windows machines will not be trucks." -- Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer

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