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Samsung OLED Roadmap  (Source: Tech-On)
Samsung roadmap shows 40 to 42-inch OLED panels will be available by 2010

In a conference earlier last week, Samsung Executive Vice President and CTO Ho Kyoon Chung announced Samsung’s roadmap for OLED displays.

Tech-On reports Chung believes Samsung will usher in the third wave for the mobile display industry  in the form of OLED displays and that the OLED market will reach $3.7 billion USD by 2010. The big electronics makers are all scrambling to get a piece of the $3 billion dollar pie with Sony grabbing the first bite with its recently announced 11-inch XEL-1 OLED HDTV.

Japanese rivival Toshiba also announced this month that it would have a 30-inch OLED full HDTV on the market by 2009. According to Chung, Samsung expects to have 14-inch, 15-inch, and 21-inch OLED panels available in 2009 with large 40 to 42-inch OLED full HD panels on the market by 2010. That would mean Toshiba would beat Samsung to market with larger screen OLED panels if it can meet its self-imposed 2009 deadline.

Toshiba, once a strong supporter of SED technology, appears to be the technology leader in OLED after its patent and manufacturing deals for SED displays dissolved last year.

In May of this year, Sony announced the world’s first flexible OLED panel a mere 0.3mm thick and able to produce 16.7 million colors. Samsung says it will have flexible OLED panels on the market by 2012 at the latest. There are more plans for OLED technology that merely using them for HDTV and computer screens, we will see OLED lighting systems at some point.

Chung told Tech-On, “It won't be long before we commercialize them (OLED lighting systems); because the OLED's light emitting efficiency is currently doubling every year. The company currently achieves 50lm/W luminance, a life of 20,000 hours till the initial luminance halves and a color rendering property of more than 80 colors.”

Chung went on to say, “Our cost goal is 1 euro cent per lumen (for OLED light systems).”



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RE: when they say HD...
By daftrok on 10/29/2007 7:36:47 PM , Rating: 2
Not only is that nearly an 8.3 megapixel screen, dual 8800 Ultras would not be capable of handling such a resolution. Still would be awesome, but I would prefer that for a 120" projector and not a 42" display.


RE: when they say HD...
By maverick85wd on 10/29/2007 8:02:37 PM , Rating: 2
true, but I'd imagine in three years they will have graphics cards capable of, if not 3840x2160, at least something pretty close. Even now they can usually put out 1920x1200, already more than a 1080p display can show.

Also, I would like to sit within a few feet of said display not 10-15 feet back. While I agree projectors are great, for computer use anything over 40-45" is a bit excessive.... some might even say anything over 24" or so. Then again I don't have a projector... trying one may change my mind... but I usually like to sit close to my monitor so I am doubtful.


RE: when they say HD...
By FITCamaro on 10/29/2007 10:56:42 PM , Rating: 2
Actually video cards can do 2560x1600


RE: when they say HD...
By Moishe on 10/30/2007 11:39:38 AM , Rating: 2
I do a lot of gaming on my 720p projector... The resolution is small enough to not require an amazing GPU but it's enough to quite enjoy gaming on a 110" screen. I've tried a lot of games, like Bioshock, Oblivion, BF2142, etc and they tend to be pretty decent looking. Dark games like Thief 3 look especially nice. Obviously there is a tradeoff for the size but in a dark room with surround sound I've had no complaint.


RE: when they say HD...
By bunnyfubbles on 10/30/2007 1:10:22 AM , Rating: 2
You're still thinking inside the box. If there are screens with resolutions as insanely high as 3840x2160, scaling down to lower resolutions is going to produce much better looking interpolated resolutions than what current screens can do.

Heck, scaling down to 1920x1080 would eliminate need for pixel interpolation as the ratio is a perfect 4:1, and when 1920x1080 is above average now it would certainly still be at least 'acceptable' in the near future when such displays are available.

Of course that's all very wishful thinking, I'd think the screens would maintain a fairly standard resolution trend and offer 1080p for TV oriented products and 1920x1200 for PC monitors (at least I'm hoping, I'm tired of the 1680x1050 dominance on the widescreen PC monitor front)


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