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NVIDIA's GeForce 8800 GT (G92) will feature high-end performance with a smaller thermal envelope and single-slot cooling.  (Source: NVIDIA)

ZOTAC GeForce 8800GT AMP! Edition overclocked to 700 MHz core, 2000 MHz memory and 1700 MHz shader clocks. The ZOTAC GeForce 8800GT AMP! Edition will retail for €249 in Europe and Asia regions  (Source: ZOTAC)

ASUS EN8800GT with Company of Heroes  (Source: ASUS)

GIGABYTE GV-NX88T512H-B with BioWare's Neverwinter Nights  (Source: Gigabyte)

BIOSTAR's GeForce 8800 GT offering, dubbed the V8803GT52   (Source: BIOSTAR)
NVIDIA today launches its newest mainstream part, the GeForce 8800 GT

NVIDIA today is set to launch its newest midrange graphics card part, the GeForce 8800 GT, previously known by its codename G92. NVIDIA guidance states that its newest graphics card will be sold at a retail price in the $199 and $249 price range.

Development around the G92 processor revolved around reducing the thermal and power draw on the GeForce 8800 GTX (G80) processor.  G80 was manufactured on TSMC's 90nm process node while the G92 is manufactured on TSMC's 65nm node.  This shrink allows a single 8800 GT to operate on a 105 Watt draw, almost 80 Watts less than the 8800 GTX during heavy operation.

Top-to-bottom, the GeForce 8800 GT fits snugly between NVIDIA's GeForce 8800 GTS 640 MB, which NVIDIA sets at a retail price of $349, and NVIDIA's GeForce 8600 GTS, which is sold for $149.

The GeForce 8800 GT sports a 100 MHz speed bump over the 8800 GTS, and comes factory clocked at 600 MHz. The 600 MHz clock speed of the 8800 GT is actually 25 MHz higher than the 8800 GTX's default GPU clock, which is set at 575 MHz. The 8800 GT's clock speed also comes within striking distance of the GeForce 8800 Ultra's 612 MHz GPU clock speed.

The NVIDIA GeForce 8800 GT features 112 stream processors, 16 fewer than the 128 stream processors found on the ultra high-end 8800 GTX and 16 more than the 96 stream processors found on NVIDIA's 8800 GTS.

The stream processors of the 8800 GT come clocked at 1500 MHz, the same speed as the stream processors of the GeForce 8800 Ultra. Comparatively, the GeForce 8800 GTX comes with its stream processors clocked at 1350 MHz while the 8800 GTS' stream processors are clocked at 1200 MHz.   

The GeForce 8800 GT features up to 1024MB of GDDR3 memory, which is based on a 256-bit memory interface. According to NVIDIA, total memory bandwidth rings in at 57.6 GBps, and the texture fill rate is 33.6 billion/second. Naturally, the two preceding figures are only theoretical values; actual values are bound to be quite different.

The GDDR3 memory of the GeForce 8800 GT comes clocked at 900 MHz -- equal to the memory frequency of the GeForce 8800 GTX. However, the 8800 GT falls short of the 8800 Ultra's memory speed, which is 1080 MHz (2160 MHz effective).

NVIDIA guidance states that the GeForce 8800 GT supports the new PCIe 2.0 bus standard. The PCI-Express Special Interest Group claims that the new bus standard yield improvements in bandwidth.

High-definition video fans will be glad to hear that the GeForce 8800 GT comes integrated with support for NVIDIA's 2nd generation PureVideo HD engine, which allows for H.264 video decoding to be offloaded from the processor and on to the video card.  HDCP support is also present on all reference designs.

NVIDIA guidance promises a hard launch with its GeForce 8800 GT cards, however, so far only Gigabyte, Palit and Zotac have 8800 GT-based offerings.  Newegg independently confirmed with DailyTech that the card will be available online after the 6AM embargo lift.


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Wownessss! So much potential!
By gochichi on 11/1/2007 11:52:06 PM , Rating: 1
I was so ready to drop $200 to $250.00 on one of these but the market is messing things up. I hope they don't mess around and strive to reach the target price.

I have an 8600GT that I paid $99 for... and I have to say, the bad reviews had an awesome effect on that product. B/c yeah, at $200.00 it sucked, but it immediately plummeted... after horrible reviews.

Now the exact opposite is happening here, and it really does kind of hurl chunks... again, if it goes away in a couple of weeks, that's fine, but I'm not paying $300.00... I've been waiting too long for it.

The potential for this card is unbelievable. IF Apple decides to build a small tower that takes this card they could actually deliver on their gaming promises. And because it's relatively cool running for this much speed. It's a thought... it's an amazing opportunity for them, and if they don't take it... WOW.

Of course PCs with this are gonna be great, but for Apple, it could be something that really changes the outcome of their current surge. Is the surge going to be permanent? Or are they just kidding around?

My Mac laptop runs Quake 4 like a beast... I was SO surprised... I wasn't expecting that at all. They could be on to something huge, b/c whether you buy a new Vista PC or a new Apple PC you're going to be excited about the upgrade.

People tend to compare their new PC to their old PC, and if their new PC is a Mac, and it's awesome and has technology like this... and their old PC is well... old... they're going to think Apple = Good for a very long time.

I know that's beside the point.




"And boy have we patented it!" -- Steve Jobs, Macworld 2007

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