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Honda's 2.2-liter i-CTDi diesel engine  (Source: Honda)

2008 Honda Accord EX Sedan  (Source: Honda)
Honda readies its diesel engines for passenger vehicles in the U.S.

DailyTech reported in early June that Honda's newly redesigned Accord would receive a diesel engine. Honda today confirmed that the 2009 Honda Accord would be available with an optional 2.2 liter i-CTDi 4-cylinder Tier 2 Bin 5 diesel engine.

The diesel engine is reported to produce in excess of 150 HP, while torque -- always a diesel strength -- is pegged at 260 lb-ft. The diesel will be emissions legal in all 50 states and is set to deliver real word fuel economy in excess of 40 MPG.

If the fuel economy estimates pass the Environmental Protection Agency's testing, that would make the diesel Accord more fuel efficient than the previous generation Accord Hybrid and Toyota's current Camry Hybrid.

The 2.2 liter diesel is expected to be closely followed by a new 3.5 liter V6 diesel destined for Honda's large vehicles. The engine is 30 percent more fuel efficient than the current 3.5 liter V6 gasoline engine used in the Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline according to the Nikkei newspaper.

In addition to the diesel news, Honda also announced that the CR-Z hybrid concept will make it to production. The small two-seater uses the same powertrain as the Civic Hybrid (4-cylinder gasoline engine, Integrated Motor Assist and CVT) and is likely to better its 40 MPG/45 MPG city/highway EPA ratings.

The CR-Z will be accompanied by a $22,000 five-seat Global Small Hybrid (GSH) which will do battle with Toyota's Prius in 2009.



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RE: Here's a solution Honda
By timmiser on 10/26/2007 5:00:33 PM , Rating: 2
On top of the price of crude oil is the incredibly high cost of transporting it half way around the world and the environmental risk that can and does occur.


RE: Here's a solution Honda
By walk2k on 10/26/2007 5:38:32 PM , Rating: 2
Add the cost of human blood, limbs and lives lost please then come back.

Also there are better things to turn into biodiesel than corn. Soybeans and hemp for starters.


RE: Here's a solution Honda
By Spuke on 10/26/2007 7:11:15 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Soybeans and hemp for starters.
Yeah, you can use that stuff to make things like tape and speaker cones.


RE: Here's a solution Honda
By walk2k on 10/26/2007 8:00:41 PM , Rating: 2
The original diesel engine was designed to run on peanut oil.


RE: Here's a solution Honda
By SunAngel on 10/26/2007 8:30:50 PM , Rating: 1
"Analysts agreed with the study’s conclusion that biodiesel compares favorably with ethanol from an environmental standpoint. “Biodiesel is much cleaner-burning fuel and much less harmful to the environment,” Daniel W. Basse, president of AgResource in Chicago, an economic forecasting firm, said Wednesday.

But Mr. Basse said ethanol production is far more efficient, with some 420 gallons of ethanol produced per acre of corn versus only 60 gallons of biodiesel per acre of soybeans. If biodiesel use ever increased greatly, Mr. Basse said, the cost of soybean oil would rise significantly."

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/13/business/13ethan...


RE: Here's a solution Honda
By Ringold on 10/26/2007 9:27:54 PM , Rating: 2
I almost raised an eyebrow at the theoretical suggestion that soybean prices would rise, then noted you found an ancient (in terms of this industry) article.

Food prices have already gone wild, and we've just barely started using ethanol. Americans and Western Europe can absorb this in the form of inflation, but middle income nations such as Mexico have already had riots and low income developing, or, ahem, "transitional" economies could be devastated if they're food importers.

I firmly believe that the humanitarian aspect, that being massive global inflation and considerable human suffering from doubling, tripling and quadrupling food prices, is an even more convincing case against using crops for fuel. What's more important to environmentalists; allowing a hungry family in Mexico to have a full dinner of their cultures traditional foods or saving a little CO2?

IMHO, this mad drive to ethanol is primarily driven by the agribiz lobby and given the nod to by the likes of Greenpeace because, hey, a little human suffering is a good thing, we deserve it, apparently.

There is far more promising technology in the works, not even refering to cellulose, if only the farm lobby can be held at bay and fanatical "greens" can stop bloody hyperventilating can spoiled children.


RE: Here's a solution Honda
By Ringold on 10/26/2007 9:59:07 PM , Rating: 2
"can" in the last sentence = like

Also:
http://www.thefinancials.com/charts/i001572v.PDF
http://www.thefinancials.com/charts/i001610v.PDF
http://www.thefinancials.com/charts/i001625v.PDF

Having a hard time finding commodity price charts for free that I can link to, but those ought to work. For high-income environmentalists in California shopping at Whole Foods, no big deal. For everybody else that's a kick in the teeth and it's only just begun. Not trying to be alarmist; my language is justified, as the transition to biofuels based off edible crops really is just begining and yields just can't respond that quickly.

The measurement here hides the margin compression that is likely occuring but even with that nice cushion food inflation is marching rapidly towards 5%.

http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/series/CPIUFD...

Of course, so is energy measurements, but air conditioning is a convenience. Food, not so much.

This should also be free to view:
http://www.economist.com/markets/indicators/displa...

+30% for a broad market food indicator.. not sure what's in that, but just more evidence.

Also, internal oil firms projections (I think PTR's CEO was the last I heard say this) think oil could return to $45 in the long run. It seems clear enough Iranian and Turkish provocation is driving at least some of these record prices. Food, on the other hand, is probably not being stoked in such a way.


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