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Nintendo says that not everyone will be able to find a Wii

Even a year after launch, the Nintendo Wii still remains a hot item that rarely ever stays in retail stock –and comments from Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime indicate that demand will once again outstrip supply this holiday season.

“We have been sold out worldwide since we launched,” said Fils-Aime to the Mercury News. “Every time we put more into the marketplace, we sell more, which says that we are not even close to understanding where the threshold is between supply and demand.”

Fils-Aime adds that Nintendo is doing everything it can to meet the demand for Wii, and that “The issue is not a lack of production.”

“The issue is we went in with a curve that was aggressive, but the demand has been substantially more than that. And the ability to ramp up production and to sustain it is not a switch that you flick on. We're working very hard to make sure that consumers are satisfied this holiday, but I can't guarantee that we're going to meet demand. As a matter of fact, I can tell you on the record we won't,” said Fils-Aime.

In a previous story, the Nintendo president said that holiday supplies of the Wii will be “substantially more than the launch, substantially more than has been seen to date ... given the level of demand and given the fact that the more we put in, the more we sell, it is still going to be difficult to get your hands on the Wii.” 

Since launch, the Wii has topped the sales charts. NPD sales data from August showed the Wii selling 403,600 units, while the Xbox 360 sold 276,000 and the PS3 130,600. The Wii also became the fastest selling console in history in the UK, and according to several sources, Nintendo’s latest machine is now the worldwide leader for the generation.



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RE: How supplies till be constrained?
By robinthakur on 10/2/2007 6:40:28 AM , Rating: 2
I actually bought all three consoles. I bought the 360 and PS3 to resell, I didn't buy any games for them or additional accessories because I know that its where they could claw back some of the loss they made on the hardware, so I've ended up hurting Microsoft and Sony financially, and giving the profits to Nintendo. How funny is that? The Wii is the real deal, the PS3 and Xbox 360 are not Dodge Vipers or whatever you want to call them. They are like huge lumbering beasts trying to catch the far more highly evolved and nimble Nintendo. What Nintendo did is so smart, it will go down in history for being textbook 'how to regain control of an industry through being positively different.' and not following the dinosaurs into extinction.

Halo 3 is not especially impressive or great as a game, if it was a no name shooter without the gajillion dollar marketing, it would be all but ignored. Just because its a brand that Microsoft clings to in the vain hope of trying to turn a profit, and 360 fans cling to in the hope of having an 'exclusive franchise' for bragging rights, its forgotten that this is just a FPS, with unremarkable graphics, derivative characterisation and gameplay that is eclipsed not just by GOW but also by most PC shooters which have ever been released in the last 5 years. Its funny because its true...so why the hype?


RE: How supplies till be constrained?
By encryptkeeper on 10/2/2007 8:54:09 AM , Rating: 2
Its funny because its true...so why the hype?

Because you can hump fragged soldiers.

Quite frankly, I think the the entire video game industry is slowly beginning to wake up to the fact that graphics won't carry the industry forever. When I told someone about the Playstation 3 coming out in a couple of years (this was 2004) he was like, "Geez man how much more realistic can the graphics get?". And it's true, how much better can graphics get over things like GOW and Crysis. Screenshots of people from Crysis look damn close to photographs thanks to DX 10. Prime 3 proves it: new and innovative gameplay is the way to keep the industry alive.


By Hieyeck on 10/3/2007 6:11:41 PM , Rating: 2
Quoted for truth.

Companies need to return to the roots of gaming and make games that are FUN. Sid Meier in his 20+ years of developing games, is NEVER on the cutting edge of graphics. Yet he still manages to succeed 90% of the time (some might argue 100%, but there are bad Sid games). Because he spends his budget on creating the GAME, not the GRAPHICS. Far Cry is the biggest example of the graphics flop. By god it was beautiful for its time, but the game SUCKED, and it failed to sell as well as expected. I think Nintendo is picking up on this and I dare say that they aren't even BOTHERING to compete for the 'gamer' market anymore. They're targeting the bigger, 'family', market. And because of this, I would say that Wii is in a league of its own.


By clovell on 10/2/2007 11:37:52 AM , Rating: 2
Have you played through Halo 3? I have. I'm impressed with it. There really arent' many other games with the variety of vehicles, weapons, enemies, and friendlies - you don't have it in GOW or HL2 - that may not impress you, but Halo isn't just some cookie-cutter FPS like some folks would like to believe.

Microsoft's hopes to turn a profit on Halo 3 are hardly in vain - check out the latest sales numbers. And, the hype is there for a couple reasons: Halo put the xbox on the map. Plus, Halo can afford it. GOW will have sequels, so we'll get to see how it stacks up in the end.

I'm sorry - I'm just getting sick of the comments on Halo 3. I find it laughable that anyone can try to actually make an arguement that it is not a good game as if they were objective. Some people will like it, some people won't. Enjoy it or move on.


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