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Nintendo says that not everyone will be able to find a Wii

Even a year after launch, the Nintendo Wii still remains a hot item that rarely ever stays in retail stock –and comments from Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime indicate that demand will once again outstrip supply this holiday season.

“We have been sold out worldwide since we launched,” said Fils-Aime to the Mercury News. “Every time we put more into the marketplace, we sell more, which says that we are not even close to understanding where the threshold is between supply and demand.”

Fils-Aime adds that Nintendo is doing everything it can to meet the demand for Wii, and that “The issue is not a lack of production.”

“The issue is we went in with a curve that was aggressive, but the demand has been substantially more than that. And the ability to ramp up production and to sustain it is not a switch that you flick on. We're working very hard to make sure that consumers are satisfied this holiday, but I can't guarantee that we're going to meet demand. As a matter of fact, I can tell you on the record we won't,” said Fils-Aime.

In a previous story, the Nintendo president said that holiday supplies of the Wii will be “substantially more than the launch, substantially more than has been seen to date ... given the level of demand and given the fact that the more we put in, the more we sell, it is still going to be difficult to get your hands on the Wii.” 

Since launch, the Wii has topped the sales charts. NPD sales data from August showed the Wii selling 403,600 units, while the Xbox 360 sold 276,000 and the PS3 130,600. The Wii also became the fastest selling console in history in the UK, and according to several sources, Nintendo’s latest machine is now the worldwide leader for the generation.



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By ET on 10/2/2007 3:47:09 AM , Rating: 2
My point was that the Wii is never going to be able to offer games with the perceived high quality the market is rewarding so much (stunning visuals in High Definition for example).

I don't think that's mainly what the market is rewarding. Halo 3 isn't a success because it's a hi-def game. Sure, that's part (if it didn't have good graphics buyers would likely have been disappointed), but the main reason it's selling well is the strong brand.

The market does reward good looking games, but it doesn't reward "stunning visuals in High Definition", because most people don't care about that or understand it. People who buy the Xbox 360 or PS3 might care, but non-hardcore gamers don't. This is proved again and again with games like The Sims and World of Warcraft. Cartoonish graphics and good graphical design and polish do more than hi-def and shaders.

Also, "high quality" is mostly in the gameplay.


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