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Print 36 comment(s) - last by DeepBlue1975.. on Oct 2 at 10:28 PM


Nokia pokes fun at Apple's iPhone  (Source: Mac Rumors forums, mcdj)

Nokia N95 8GB
Nokia fires back at Apple

There is no hotter phone on that market than Apple's iPhone. The phone launched in June to massive hype and crowds of eager fans waiting to get their paws on one.

Glassy-eyed Apple lovers were eager to fork over $599 for the 8GB iPhone and $499 for the 4GB iPhone. Those elated iPhone fans, however, turned into blood-lusting Steve Jobs haters when Apple announced a $200 price cut for the 8GB iPhone.

Apple recoiled a bit and offered $100 of in-store credit for ticked off iPhone owners, but the damage was already done.

On the rollercoaster of Apple/iPhone love/hate, iPhone owners were once again elated when it was announced that a free unlock solution was available for the phone. The firmware hack freed customers from AT&T's grasp in the U.S. market (with the only other option being T-Mobile); while worldwide customers were given a reason to embrace the iPhone as a wide range of carriers could be used.

But the happiness didn't last long -- Apple dropped the 1.1.1 firmware update on customers which not only relocked the iPhone, but turned a number of phones into "iBricks."

The latest move by Apple has forced some customers to scream for a class-action lawsuit against the Cupertino-based company.

While all of this has been going on, Nokia must have been sitting back with a big grin on its face. Recently, the company decided to take advantage of Apple's image problem with iPhone customers and started a new advertising campaign.

A keen Mac Rumors forum member spotted a new Nokia ad in New York which takes direct aim at the iPhone. The ad displays such phrases as "Phones should be open to anything," "The best devices have no limits" and "Open to anything."

The ad directs onlooker to Nokia's Nseries phones. The N95, which launched earlier this year, features a 2.6" QVGA screen, 160MB of internal memory, microSD slot for memory expansion, 3G, WiFi and Bluetooth. A newer model, the N95 8GB, has since been released with 8GB of internal memory and a slightly larger 2.8" QVGA screen.



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Wait a minute...
By Whiskyboy on 10/1/2007 11:51:37 AM , Rating: 5
Did I miss something here... I'm pretty certain all of Nokia's previous offerings end up locked into one carrier or another initially. Does this new rig break that trend? Either way, its a ridiculous joke that one of the pioneers of exclusive phone contracts is trying to point fingers at Apple. Selling a locked subsidized phone reminds a me of the cable box exclusivity issue that was at least officially banned in the US.




RE: Wait a minute...
By Awax on 10/1/2007 12:15:34 PM , Rating: 1
You got it right.


RE: Wait a minute...
By spluurfg on 10/1/2007 1:39:05 PM , Rating: 2
The unlocking software is pretty easy to get ahold of in general though... also, at least in the UK, the networks will often unlock your phone for you once your contract is finished (or after 12 months), or if you want to start a contract/PAYG on a different network, the new network can unlock it for you. Not so helpful for those who wish to travel (they want you to use their network abroad and pay an arm and a leg for it) but helpful for those changing networks.

Basically Nokia and other manufacturers make the unlock codes available to the networks, where as Apple doesn't.

On an unrelated note Nokia's stock got hammered today.


RE: Wait a minute...
By ghost101 on 10/1/2007 12:26:30 PM , Rating: 2
But you can buy the phone outright for $600 or so and it will be completely unlocked. The Symbian OS also means that apps can be made by anyone.


RE: Wait a minute...
By rgsaunders on 10/1/2007 10:38:20 PM , Rating: 2
Actually, I just found wholesale price of 299 US from a distributor in Vancouver. http://computers.lotus-land.ca/gate.html?name=Foru...


RE: Wait a minute...
By Hare on 10/1/2007 12:31:33 PM , Rating: 3
It's an open operating system. You can install games, apps etc. I think that's (at least one) point they were trying to make.


RE: Wait a minute...
By Lonyo on 10/1/2007 12:33:37 PM , Rating: 5
Generally you buy a phone from your phone company, and they subsidise the cost, and lock the phone to their network. You can, however, unlock the phone, and future updates don't tend to break phones which have been unlocked.
In Finland (where Nokia is based) it's illegal for a phone not to be unlockable.


RE: Wait a minute...
By Oregonian2 on 10/1/2007 1:54:26 PM , Rating: 2
At least at the time of purchase, my KRZR was cheaper being bought ulocked (and unbranded) on eBay than buying one (branded and locked) from AT&T/Cingular. Never figured out the subsidize part.


RE: Wait a minute...
By neothe0ne on 10/1/2007 5:32:12 PM , Rating: 2
This is something I don't understand. By branded, do you mean the carrier's logo on the battery cover, or do you mean the carrier's logo on the back screen when the phone is flipped open, or both?

I probably have the only Razr from Cingular without a Cingular (or T-Mobile) logo within a radius of at least 50 miles.


RE: Wait a minute...
By fleshconsumed on 10/2/2007 12:32:00 PM , Rating: 2
Branding refers to both, putting company logo (brand) on the phone housing and modifying phone firmware/operating system to include provider specific features.


RE: Wait a minute...
By sprockkets on 10/1/2007 12:41:00 PM , Rating: 5
You can buy the N95 unlocked. You can't buy an iphone unlocked. See the simple difference?


RE: Wait a minute...
By Polynikes on 10/1/2007 12:51:05 PM , Rating: 4
Perhaps, but did they brick your phone because you used some non-Nokia software on it?


RE: Wait a minute...
By Justin Case on 10/1/2007 1:29:29 PM , Rating: 2
In some regions, some carriers do get "priority" on some new models (it rarely lasts more than a couple of months, though). However:

a) That typically applies only to low-end, "fashion accessory" phones (okay, the iPhone might fit into the latter, but not the former).

b) You can buy the same phone (unlocked) from a different region (or country) and use it with any operator in your region.

c) If you manage to find a way to unlock the phone, you can use it for whatever you want (you might still be bound by the original carrier's contract to pay a fee for X months, of course, but Nokia will never kill your phone).

The only reason why Apple can get away with this in the US is that the American cellphone market is completely stagnant compared to Europe or Japan. There are $200 European / Japanese phones that come unlocked and can do a lot more than the iPhone does (including 3G, MMS, video, longer battery life, access to tons of open-source software, etc.).


RE: Wait a minute...
By mooncancook on 10/1/2007 1:36:21 PM , Rating: 2
I believe most if not all cell phones sold in the US through a carrier are locked. However you can always call their CS to unlock the phone (tell them you need to travel and use the phone in another country), and you would never have problem with it or its warranty.


RE: Wait a minute...
By DeepBlue1975 on 10/2/2007 10:28:40 PM , Rating: 2
Maybe that happens in the US market, but usually, and specially high end models from Nokia, can be purchased from a comm company locked and tied up to a contract, or directly from nokia and unlocked.

You want it cheap? You buy it from some company like AT&T.

You want it fully yours and unlocked, with no vendor stuffed, mostly useless trash installed? You go to a nokia store and buy the one you want... But you pay some big bucks for it.

Besides, as many said, anyone can develop applications for symbian OS, even you can download the SDK and all you need from Nokia's site itself.


"A politician stumbles over himself... Then they pick it out. They edit it. He runs the clip, and then he makes a funny face, and the whole audience has a Pavlovian response." -- Joe Scarborough on John Stewart over Jim Cramer

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