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New Phenom triple-core processor coming in 2008

AMD today updated its roadmap with another multi-core processor, to slot between its dual and quad-core processors – Phenom triple-core processors. The new Phenom triple-core processors feature three processing cores on a single die and based on AMD’s Barcelona architecture, which launched last week in Opteron form.

The new triple-core processors will feature similar specifications as its upcoming Phenom X2 and X4 brethren. The Socket AM2+ processors feature 512KB of L2 cache for each core and a shared pool of L3 cache. Essentially, the Phenom triple-core processors are quad-core variants with one core disabled. This allows AMD to simply disable one core on quad-core dies for maximum use of a single wafer.

AMD claims to be the only company to offer tri-core processors, which the company claims to bring “true multi-core technology to a broader audience.” AMD has not given the Phenom triple-core processors an official name yet. However, it wouldn’t be too surprising if the tri-core processors followed the current Phenon naming scheme and received the Phenom X3 name.

“With our advanced multi-core architecture, AMD is in a unique position to enable a wider range of premium desktop solutions, providing a smarter choice for customers and end users,” said Greg White, vice president and general manager, Desktop Division, AMD. “As a customer-centric company, AMD is committed to working with our OEMs to deliver compelling value propositions across their multi-core product families with capabilities that address their requirements and aspirations.”

Features unique to AMD’s Barcelona and Stars architectures such as split power planes and dynamic independent core speed adjustments remain supported on triple-core processors. Additionally, AMD Phenom triple-core processors support HyperTransport 3.0 for up to 16GB/second of I/O bandwidth.

AMD claims significant performance gains over dual-core processors with its triple-core processors in benchmarks such as SYSmark 2007 and 3DMark06, where gaming and digital content creation performance is key.

“A continued commitment to elegant design and innovative processor architecture is instrumental to revolutionizing the technology industry,” said Richard Shim, research manager for IDC's Personal Computing program. “The advent of triple-core processors is a valuable market opportunity for customers to deliver end users compelling solutions and further differentiate on the desktop.”

Expect AMD to launch its Phenom triple-core processors in Q1 2008. AMD plans to launch its quad-core Phenom X4 next quarter.


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Masterstroke
By ctoit on 9/17/2007 11:51:44 PM , Rating: 5
Like most, I thought that this was an odd move on the part of AMD at first glance. But after thinking through it, I think its a masterstroke.

For all of you who keep saying that there are limited mainstream applications out there for multi-core CPUs, you obviously do not use spreadsheets like I use spreadsheets, and you obviously have not felt the power of Excel 2007 running multi-core. So for people like me with Excel formulas running into the upper 100MBs on a routine basis, multi core and Excel 2007 is a gods gift.

So back to AMD. They are the only kid in the block with native quad core. And yes, maybe many of them fail some test, and instead of junking them, why not market them as tri-core. Also, the battle for QuadCore is only beginning and Intel already had a long head start, so AMD will find teh battle for Quad Core supremacy tough to win anyway.

But the genius stroke is actually this. AMD have obviously lost ground to Core2Duo with the Athlon X2s and is unlikey to win that race anytime soon. But hey, if they can push out an X3 for the same price (or not much difference) as a Core2Duo, then its a no brainer as far as what I will choose. One more core will get my Excel 2007 running another 30% faster, period.

And likewise on the mass-market, with mum and pops shopping for their next family PC or the kiddies summer back to school PC. Geez, this cost $199 and have 2 cores and this cost $200 and have 3 cores, mmmm, what should I choose?

So Kudos to AMD. Hope you start gaining some traction back from Intel. For an AMD fan since K6, I was finally converted by Core2Duo. But i look forward to AMD retaking the crown.




RE: Masterstroke
By z3R0C00L on 9/18/2007 12:17:05 PM , Rating: 2
And a Native Quad Core is important because...... like what actual advantage does it bring to the consumer?


RE: Masterstroke
By TomZ on 9/18/2007 1:21:02 PM , Rating: 2
None, it is primarily an AMD marketing distinction at this point.

I think it is more sensible to switch over to native quad core once yields are high enough to support them. Otherwise MCM-style quad cores are fine. Therefore it becomes a question of which is cheaper to produce.


RE: Masterstroke
By theapparition on 9/18/2007 1:07:18 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
And likewise on the mass-market, with mum and pops shopping for their next family PC or the kiddies summer back to school PC. Geez, this cost $199 and have 2 cores and this cost $200 and have 3 cores, mmmm, what should I choose?

Sorry, but the mass market doesn't buy boxed processors. And it's pure speculation of AMD's price structure for these X3's.
For the mass market lemmings, that little "Intel inside" sticker goes a long way. People are even willing to pay more for it. Explains why Intel still dominated during the Athlon64 years.


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