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The Dust Bowl of the 1930s was the worst drought in US history
A primary tenet of global warming alarmism is invalidated.

A recurring theme in my past columns is that a moderate degree of global warming is likely to be beneficial to mankind. Al Gore, on the other hand, says climate change is already causing catastrophic results. In testimony before Congress last March, he stated, "droughts are [already] becoming longer and more intense". But the findings of a group of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers say otherwise.

The scientists, led by Gemma Narisma, examined 100 years of global rainfall data. Using sophisticated wavelet analysis methods, they identified 30 cases of severe droughts lasting 10 or more years. The results showed the number of droughts dropping sharply over time. From 1900-1920, seven droughts, another seven from from 1920-1940, and eight from 1940-1960. But after that, the picture changes. In the period 1960-1980, only five droughts were recorded, and from 1980-2000 (the warmest period of all), only three occurred. Furthermore, of the most severe droughts, none began in the last 30 years..

The researchers found another surprising result. Changes in rainfall levels are not only much more common than previously thought, but they tend to occur in a very abrupt, unexplained manner. More proof that climate change is part of nature.

The work represents the first systematic survey of abrupt climate changes that have occurred in recent history. Professor Johnathan Foley, who also participated in the research, says the study is important, "because previous work largely focused on ancient climates or theoretical changes in future climates".

The findings are published in Geophysical Research Letters.



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RE: If you stop and think about it.....
By Murst on 9/12/2007 10:19:53 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I think claims of having to abandon "the entire coastline" of a nation are a bit over the top.


It is about as unrealistic as having a single species go extinct due to global warming (as opposed to a large number of species).

quote:
If one looks at the overall history of the planet, permanent polar ice caps are a rare phenomena


Even the simplets multi-cellular animals are a rare phenomena in the history of the planet. However, if you look at the history of the planet during which humans thrived, I think you'll find polar ice caps quite common.

quote:
Do you suggest we should interfere with this natural process and prevent nature from taking its course?


I think we should STOP interfering with this natural process and let is go about its own slow pace, instead of hastening it. :)


RE: If you stop and think about it.....
By cochy on 9/12/2007 12:53:16 PM , Rating: 3
People are trying to point out that Humans aren't hastening it. It seems to be a pretty open question anyway at this point.

quote:
However, if you look at the history of the planet during which humans thrived, I think you'll find polar ice caps quite common.


You also missed the point that "the time which humans thrived" is a very small period of time and thus we need to examine how the polar ice caps have waxed and waned over much longer periods to reach any meaningful conclusion on the matter.


RE: If you stop and think about it.....
By Murst on 9/12/2007 2:31:36 PM , Rating: 1
Nah, I didn't miss the point. In fact, I don't care about any other point other than the one where humans have been around. Sure, it may be egotistical, but I'd prefer if humans were around in a million years. I don't want some rat-bear-monkey mix posting on an Internet site a million years from now about the downfall of the human race. :)


By Eris23007 on 9/12/2007 6:25:54 PM , Rating: 3
Watch out for ManBearPig!!!! I'm TOTALLY CEREAL!!!

/Al


By Pythias on 9/13/2007 8:48:51 PM , Rating: 2
Well you should. Otherwise, climate statistics are skewed.


RE: If you stop and think about it.....
By geddarkstorm on 9/12/2007 1:01:12 PM , Rating: 2
The End Permian event caused the extinction of 95% of the planet's species, and 50% of all phylogenetic families. The cause? Unknown; but things got quite a bit colder for awhile after that boundary before heating up into the Devonian.

We know there was a mini ice age in Europe in the 1800's, and I'm sure there were animals that went regionally or totally extinct from that, and that wasn't human fault at all. However, it is far easier for a species to adapt to heat and moisture than cold and dry. That is obvious since the hottest and moistest places on earth have the greatest biodiversity and density--and the warmest and moistest period theoretically in earth history, the Devonian, was also the richest in life of all. The converse is true, with extreme plant and animal species loss during ice age and cooling periods.

The fact the climate changes is irrefutable. Year to year the climate fluctuates, and century to century, so forth. Technically, we are still coming out of an ice age, so warming is to be expected, nor is it happening faster than per usual, especially now that NASA's data was corrected. There's nothing to be alarmed about. Did you know, that a year ago here in Kansas City on February 14, we had the coldest Valentine's in 30 years? And that incredible cold trend continued all the way up through March and April? Weather is always swinging about.

You don't have anything to worry about; if you really cared about species and the planet, you'd be more concerned with pollution and habitat loss than anything.


By Murst on 9/12/2007 2:34:18 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
if you really cared about species and the planet, you'd be more concerned with pollution and habitat loss than anything.


Right, because pollution, habitat loss, and global warming have absolutely nothing to do with each other. ;)


By Oregonian2 on 9/12/2007 2:38:29 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
We know there was a mini ice age in Europe in the 1800's, and I'm sure there were animals that went regionally or totally extinct from that, and that wasn't human fault at all.


What happened in America? If that happened "here" it would have been totally the U.S.A.'s fault (even if it only took up a tiny part of the continent at the time). It's a well know given that anything bad is humanity's fault, especially Americans... and that's a truism whether factual or not.

Here in Oregon we've had a very cool Summer. We think we've global cooling going on.


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