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Blogger Amal Gustfra shows off his first RFID implants.  (Source: http://amal.net/)
Numerous studies linking RFID implants to cancer in animals, are gaining significant attention

Last week, Dailytech reported that California's State senate had blocked employers from requiring their employees to get "chipped"--implanted with an RFID chip that would allow for radio identification and tracking.

Now in addition to the privacy concerns, a new report by the Associate Press has brought to light serious doubts on RFID implants' medical safety.

The report details how numerous studies on RFID implants in animal test subjects, starting in the mid-1990s, revealed that the implants led to a significant increase in malignant tumor growth.

Keith Johnson, a retired toxological pathologist who led one of these studies, in 1996 at Dow Chemical Co., when interviewed in the report stated that he had no doubts about whether RFID was to blame for the increased incidence of cancer.  He is quoted as clearly stating, "The transponders were the cause of the tumors."

The findings were reviewed by top cancer specialists, who found the results disturbing.  They cautioned people that these tests were performed on animals, so that they were not necessarily applicable in humans, however, most felt additional research was a necessity.  Some went as far to say that they would not allow family members to receive implants.

Currently about 2,000 people worldwide have received RFID chips implants, according to VeriChip, the leading manufacturer of FDA-approved RFID implants, including a couple who were ordered to do so by their employer.

Verichip commented that they were "not aware of any studies that have resulted in malignant tumors in laboratory rats, mice and certainly not dogs or cats."

The company also, sells RFID chips for animals.

A significant detail to these studies is that many of them were not intended to study the correlation between RFID chip implanting to cancer--rather, during research on a separate topic the increased cancer rates were high enough to catch the researchers' attention and allow them to draw a clear conclusion that the chip was causing the increased cancer rate.

The AP report goes on to discuss the suspect nature of the FDA's approval of VeriChip's human RFID implant.  The FDA is overseen by the Department of Health and Human Sciences, which at the time of the approval, was headed by Tommy Thompson.

Just two weeks after the Jan. 10, 2005 approval of the device, Tommy Thompson resigned his post with the department and within five months assumed a position at VeriChip.  He received stock options and cash compensation for his newly acquired position.

Thompson, until recently a candidate for the 2008 Republican presidential nomination, recently denied in an interview having any familiarity with VeriChip before his resignation.

The FDA refused to comment on which studies it reviewed when approving the device.

A recent AMA report which lauded RFID implants, claimed to be entirely unaware of the studies correlating the implant to cancer.  Dr. Steven Stack, an AMA board member, said he had never heard the studies ever mentioned before.

As Dr. Stack had knowledge of the Department of Health and Human Sciences committee's review of the implant, pending FDA approval, this statement would indicate that the Committee did not take these studies into account during its approval process.

More research needs to be done before final conclusions are drawn, but as its dirty laundry comes to light, the controversial practice of RFID implanting and its FDA approval has received another major setback.



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RE: Just gather the data....
By oTAL on 9/11/2007 1:12:56 PM , Rating: 2
Really? Well, for your information it is mandatory in many countries.

I was limiting my observation to the large area around me and I suppose it is not the norm in the largest part of the world (especially in the 3rd world), so I'm sorry if that small mistake offended you.

Where I live, over 90% of the dogs have tags (licensed or not), and the licensed dogs ALL have tags. I don't know about cats, but I think they are also mandatory.

Now I'm sorry if you're having a bad day, or if someone pissed on your cheerios, but from where I'm standing my post was far more useful/thought-provoking than yours, so tone-down the attitude.


RE: Just gather the data....
By emerson85 on 9/13/2007 11:38:09 PM , Rating: 2
An interesting summary (mostly correct, based off my own knowledge of engineering and law), can be found here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microchip_implant_%28...

You'll note that animal implants are all passive.


RE: Just gather the data....
By oTAL on 9/17/2007 10:34:25 AM , Rating: 2
From the article you quoted:
quote:

Microchips are not in universal use, but there are legal requirements in some jurisdictions, such as the state of New South Wales, Australia. Some countries, such as Japan, require ISO-compliant microchips on dogs and cats being brought into the country, or for the person bringing the pet into the country to also bring a microchip reader that can read the non-ISO-compliant microchip. [23]

In New Zealand, all dogs first registered after 2006-07-01 are to be microchipped. Farmers protested that farm dogs should be exempt, drawing a parallel to the Dog Tax War of 1898. [24]. Farm dogs were exempted from microchipping in an amendment to the legislation passed in June 2006.


This supports my point. These are of course passive devices, which is assumed with RFID implants since those are overwhelmingly more popular.

Still can't understand my -1 rating and the 2 rating on an answer to my post with perls such as:
quote:
What kind of crack are you smoking?
NO, most pets DON'T have chips implanted, you are insane.
quote:
I advocate prison for anyone involved in this senseless violation of human or animal rights. This means YOU TOO. I want you in prison for violating your pet. If you think I am kidding, pull your head out of your ass, this is just not right inserting things into a living organism for your mere convenience.


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