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Steve Jobs has a change of heart

Yesterday's announcement of the $200 price reduction for the 8GB iPhone was a shock to the system. No one in the industry was expecting it and customers that had already purchased the machine at the $599 price point were fuming mad. To get an idea about how angry some customers were, look no further than this thread at Mac Rumors which is 1500+ posts long.

Steve Jobs got also got an earful with irate customers and his inbox was overloaded with customer complaints about the $200 price cut after only two months on the market.  In an open letter to all iPhone customers, Steve Jobs expressed his "observations and conclusions."

"First, I am sure that we are making the correct decision to lower the price of the 8GB iPhone from $599 to $399, and that now is the right time to do it," said Jobs. "It benefits both Apple and every iPhone user to get as many new customers as possible in the iPhone 'tent'. We strongly believe the $399 price will help us do just that this holiday season."

On the flipside, Jobs was also sympathetic to the outrage expressed by existing iPhone owners. “Therefore, we have decided to offer every iPhone customer who purchased an iPhone from either Apple or AT&T, and who is not receiving a rebate or any other consideration, a $100 store credit towards the purchase of any product at an Apple Retail Store or the Apple Online Store," Jobs continued.

Jobs noted that more details will be posted next week as Apple and AT&T work out the details of the program.

$100 of in-store credit isn't exactly the same thing as $200 in cold cash, but it's surely better than nothing at all.



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Apple Kool-Aid
By rsmech on 9/6/2007 9:50:00 PM , Rating: 3
This is the basic problem I have & maybe many others with Apple as a company not their products.

1. iPhone - I don't deny that it is or may be a great product innovative & bold. (the product) Stated as sold over 500,000 the first 2 days, revised to 230,000 or such from Apple, yet only 140,000 activations. AT&T said they had activation problems, but only said it affected about 10,000 people that weekend. Some sold on eBay (barely over retail) but with these numbers of what sold on eBay + AT&T activations + Apple store and other sources it still didn't add up to even Apples claims. The hype of the numbers always gets lower as we find out more. I will state that it still had stellar sales figures. It's just a big fish story. They had great numbers, there was no need to even stretch the reality of it you just sound like a braggart which causes the loss in credibility for me. (the company)

2. Apple notebooks - I have no complaints about (the product) . But wasn't there an article awhile back about how there was a new wireless standard that was disabled in their notebooks & when it became finalized they were going to charge customers for hardware they already paid for to activate it. Didn't they change their mind on this also? (the company) Windows OS or HP give me free updates to new hardware and some manufactures of motherboards even give me support for memory speeds that aren't even finalized yet.

3. Their image(to me) - They have a lot of good, even innovative products. I would say they have a good rep. for their quality. (the product) Their image in ads is hip, new age, and green. Isn't Al Gore on the board? Yet they have a poor rating from Green Peace on their environmental waste. (the company) They lose credibility as a wanna be to me.

4. Boot camp - great for someone who loves mac but needs some windows software. (the product) But wasn't there an article about how it was free for now but they were going to charge for it later? (the company) I can run different variations of Windows or Windows & Linux & I don't have to even think about paying extra for it.

Example 1. A good thing gets ruined by gross exaggerations. It's like cheating on benchmarks. (release the hype to sell but when it falls into the consumers hands it's very good, but not the exceptional piece of hardware you though.

Example 2 & 4. Reminds me of being a kid & dealing with an Indian Giver. They give you something only to say later I gave you that, but I didn't mean to give you this also, but I'll let you have it if you like me more.

Example 3. I hope I'm not that impressionable.

Conclusion: No complaints about product . But the company sells themselves as green (not), markets me as a kid (hip, cool), & tries to take from customers to the point of pissing them off then gives a little back for the great PR.




RE: Apple Kool-Aid
By TomZ on 9/6/2007 10:16:25 PM , Rating: 2
Amen!


"I modded down, down, down, and the flames went higher." -- Sven Olsen

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