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Toshiba HD-A35  (Source: AV Watch)
The third time's a charm with Toshiba's HD DVD player lineup

Toshiba isn't standing still when it comes to the development of HD DVD players. The company announced today that it has revamped its entry-level, mid-range and high-end players and that all three will retail for under $500.

"With a majority market share in unit sales of next generation DVD players, consumers are speaking loud and clear, and they are adopting HD DVD as their HD movie format of choice," said Jodi Sally, VP of Marketing for Toshiba's Digital A/V Group. "Because of the proven manufacturing efficiencies of the HD DVD format, Toshiba can bring this level of innovation in technology to a new generation of players with cutting-edge functionality at affordable prices."

The first new model is the entry-level HD-A3. Toshiba didn't divulge many details on the HD-A3 other than the fact that it features 1080i output. The mid-range HD-A30 adds support for 1080p output along with what Toshiba calls "CE-Link" or HDMI-CEC. CE-Link allows for a two-way connection between the HD DVD player and TV over HMDI.

The high-end HD-A35 also features 1080p support and CE-Link, but also adds support for Deep Color over HDMI, 5.1 channel analog audio output and High Bit Rate 7.1 Audio over HDMI.

All three players feature a slimmer exterior design with rounded edges and a high-gloss black finish. According to Toshiba, the third generation players are half as tall as the first generation units.

Toshiba's HD-A30 will be available in September at a price of $399.99. The HD-A3 and HD-A35 will be available in October with price tags of $299.99 and $499.99 respectively.



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RE: pretty silly
By MGSsancho on 8/6/2007 8:15:09 PM , Rating: 2
I have Charter Cable, and they give me 480P, 720P, and 1080i depending on the show. movies come in 1080i with DTS, abc gives 1080i DTS, extreme home make over comes in at 720P stereo. most commericals in HD channels are 720P stereo. sometimes a car commercial comes in at 720P DTS. but it switches a lot. credits in movies come in stereo where the movies comes in DTS. 1080i looks fantastic. however its te compression that kills it. like a helicopter scene flying over water. looks horrible


RE: pretty silly
By Guyver on 8/7/2007 10:40:37 AM , Rating: 2
You might want to check and see what EXACTLY they define as 720p and 1080i.

Essentially, they are only taking the vertical line count to legally misrepresent that their product doesn't actually feed you a 1920x1080 interlaced picture. I forget what it is, but let's just say for the sake of argument that it is 1500 x 1080. They say it is 1080i, but if you go and look at the FCC's website 1080i is defined to be 1920 x 1080.

Be careful on how services are marketed to get your hard earned dollar. You're not getting everything you believe you're getting.


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