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Artist rendering of the X-47B in combat  (Source: Northrop Grumman)

  (Source: Northrop Grumman)

  (Source: Northrop Grumman)
Northtrop Grumman and the U.S. Navy will fly the X-47B in late 2009

The U.S. military is furthering its funding of unmanned vehicles for combat. Just last week, DailyTech reported on the U.S. Army's new SWORDS unmanned robots which roam the Iraqi battlefield carrying M249 machines guns -- and in turn put human soldiers out of harm's way. The military's latest unmanned project leaves the desert behind in order to take to the skies.

The U.S. Navy on Friday awarded Northrop Grumman a six-year, $635.8 million USD contract to further develop the X-47B fixed-wing unmanned air system (UAS). The funding for the Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program will allow Northrop Grumman to conduct take-offs and landings from the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered aircraft carriers.

"We are proud of our legacy of innovation and creativity in developing new combat capabilities and are pleased to be selected to lead this revolutionary advancement in unmanned systems capabilities," said Northrop Grumman's Scott Seymour.

"The UCAS-D award is the culmination of several years of effort with the Navy to show the benefit of melding the capabilities of a survivable, persistent, long-range UCAS with those of the aircraft carrier," continued Northrop Grumman's Gary Ervin. "The UCAS-D program will reduce the risk of eventual integration of unmanned air systems into carrier environments."

Northrop Grumman will build two X47-B aircraft for the U.S. Navy -- the first of which will take flight during the closing months of 2009. The company expects to begin the first carrier landings in 2011.

The X-47B, a sister-ship to the X-47A, has a cruising altitude of 40,000+ feet and a combat radius of 1,500 nautical miles. The stealthy vehicle can carry an internal payload of 4,500 pounds and can travel at high subsonic speeds.



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And then SkyNet
By TimberJon on 8/6/2007 11:24:27 AM , Rating: 1
Yea, lets give computers or AI our bombers to play with. Lets leave chance and chaos-thought to machines. Good idea.




RE: And then SkyNet
By Master Kenobi (blog) on 8/6/2007 11:30:48 AM , Rating: 2
Ah not this argument again. The machines do not make decisions on what to attack. We paint the targets and tell them what to kill. The machine just knows how to arm the proper weapon for the job, how to target, where to fire, and how to fly.

Frankly, I am looking forward to this new age of warfare. Stealth, unmanned, lasers, new targeting systems, scramjet's, etc... This new age of warfare is quite impressive.


RE: And then SkyNet
By Scorpion on 8/6/2007 4:02:32 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Frankly, I am looking forward to this new age of warfare. Stealth, unmanned, lasers, new targeting systems, scramjet's, etc... This new age of warfare is quite impressive.

I think you've romanticized too many video games and Schwarzenegger movies and anime films. Image you're the nation who doesn't have the wealth or resources to produce these kinds of arms and tell me how much you look forward to it.


RE: And then SkyNet
By masher2 (blog) on 8/6/2007 4:29:54 PM , Rating: 3
> "Image you're the nation who doesn't have the wealth or resources to produce these kinds of arms and tell me how much you look forward to it."

We don't have to imagine-- we just have to look back to history, back to the period in which warfare didn't rely upon high-tech weaponry. It certainly didn't stop people from fighting. In fact, war was far more common then than it is today. And far more destructive as well, with entire villages (and sometimes even entire civilizations) being routinely decimated.

Today, all but a tiny fraction of the population will go their entire lives without coming face to face with war. Even those that do will generally not be exposed to the rape, murder, and pillage common in centuries past. 99.95% of the civilian world will see war only on TV. For those few civilians who do, it generally means power outages and temporary housing. It no longer means the family's possesions stolen, Dad murdered, Mom and 12 year Sally raped repeatedly, and 8 year old Johnnie trotted off in chains to be sold into a life of slavery.

I'd call that a huge improvement. What about you?


RE: And then SkyNet
By mdogs444 on 8/6/2007 11:32:02 AM , Rating: 2
There is no true AI, and our people actually control the movements.

Maybe you've seen iRobot or something too many times.


RE: And then SkyNet
By FITCamaro on 8/6/2007 11:38:55 AM , Rating: 2
True AI is possible. It just requires such a large machine today that its impractical for anything other than research into AI.

We're still probably decades away from the technology and software of having a real artificial intelligence being able to fit into something the size of a fighter much less a humanoid robot. Even if we did solve the problem of the processing power and software, we'd still have the power source issue to solve. We're not going to have nuclear powered robots walking around.


RE: And then SkyNet
By bldckstark on 8/6/2007 1:25:41 PM , Rating: 2
How about a link to back up this claim?

I am aware of nothing above the insect level of AI that actually works as intended, let alone human.


RE: And then SkyNet
By FITCamaro on 8/6/2007 2:47:34 PM , Rating: 2
They've gotten AI up to the level of an infant. The issue though is programming efficiency, speed of the computers, and storage space.

If you think about it, what exactly is our ability to make decisions? It's what we've learned. We've learned as we've grown that certain things do and don't work. From those experiences we try new things and see if those work. Why should a computer be any different? The brain is nothing more than an organic computer capable of extremely fast processing and near infinite data storage. The only issue is how well do we remember everything.

Sorry I'm having trouble finding a link to the example I'm thinking of. But just because we haven't mastered it yet, don't think it isn't possible. All it takes is time, ingenuity, money, and creativity. I think in the next 50 years, as computer grow more powerful and ever smaller, we'll see the birth of a computerized brain. Maybe not as smart as us, but able to make decisions based on what its experienced.

I believe the experiment I'm referring to was called HAL though. I have a book on robots back home. But I'm not there. Otherwise I could look for it.


RE: And then SkyNet
By Scorpion on 8/6/2007 4:23:21 PM , Rating: 2
Boy you sure got it figured out. Too bad you haven't a clue what you're talking about. Do you know how to program such AI? Simple AI? Ever heard of a little thing called "Bayes Theorem", "Artificial Neural Networks", "Bayes Decision rule"? These are all very simple probabilistic tools which often used on only the simplest events, but first you have to build models for them. I haven't even scraped the surface on information theoretic research, but it is far more complex then you seem think it is. These models occur billions of times in parallel all the time in our brains. To model something like that would take such tremendous resources and time, and that's only after we understand the models better than we already do. See also "Turing Machine".

I see too many people here too swayed by science fiction rather than science fact. Do you have any proof to your claim of "infant like" AI capabilities? Do you understand the cognitive abilities of infants? Do you know that infants are not capable of understanding that when something disappears from view that it has not disappeared from existence? That you can repeatedly show them something and take it away and they will still cry every time it is hidden. And that's only a small example. That is so very very far from the cognitive abilities of a full grown adult.


RE: And then SkyNet
By Ringold on 8/6/2007 5:26:55 PM , Rating: 2
I don't know about any of this myself, but I can draw some conclusion from whats known:

1) Super-computers are working their way towards the raw processing power of the human brain

2) Super-computers are also working on increasingly vast amounts of RAM

3) Moores Law

4) The spurt of quantum computing news over the last year

All that together means to me that, sooner or later, it'll be possible. We don't need robots pondering how many angels can fit on the tip of pin; just "Is that a target?" and "Should I fire at it."

Now, if programmers can't keep up with the raw power, as you (and game developers) hint at, then that's one thing.


RE: And then SkyNet
By FITCamaro on 8/6/2007 6:06:59 PM , Rating: 2
Yes I realize it is far more complex than I am stating.

And you said it yourself. It requires building a model. Then it has to "occur" or be run on a computer. Eventually the models will be made and perfected and the computers will be fast enough to handle them in real time much like the brain.

It's all just a matter of time and people far more intelligent than I am to figure it all out.

You're focusing on the present. I'm looking to the future. I don't doubt the capabilities of mankind one bit. Mankind has shown over and over than where theres a will theres a way. Its just a matter of expending the effort to do it. And scientists and researchers are.

100 years ago if you told someone that you could talk to someone via a video conference in real time they'd put you in an asylum. Who's to say what'll happen in the next 100 years. Technology has exploded in the past 40 years. Give it another 40 and see where we are.


RE: And then SkyNet
By BiuTech on 8/6/2007 4:32:29 PM , Rating: 2
I agree that it's just a matter of time. The future is automation and robotics, and as quantum computing continues to advance, much more will be possible with true AI.

It's amazing to see the imaginations of people like Isaac Asimov progressively develop into reality.


RE: And then SkyNet
By Black69ta on 8/7/2007 11:57:00 AM , Rating: 2
Sorry as this is kind of off the topic and backs you up without providing any proof but, if you want proof that we have a real possibility to one day see a good AI then watch old Star Trek episodes. the hypospray exists today. there is a limited function "tri-corder", even the teleporter has been demonstrated over a short distance, I think I read that in either CPU or MaximumPC, it was at a major Univ. Even a optical computer is close to a reality. Only 12 years ago ('95) a Cray-4 cost $11 Million and only delivered 32GigiFLOPs now a Sony PS3 delivers ~6 TeraFLOPS for around $500. So, I don't think the raw processing power required for "real" AI is that far off.


RE: And then SkyNet
By marvdmartian on 8/6/2007 11:42:05 AM , Rating: 2
Shouldn't your username be John Connor??? ;)


RE: And then SkyNet
By masteraleph on 8/6/2007 11:48:21 AM , Rating: 2
How about a nice game of chess?


"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)

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