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AMD demo system with a Phenom running at 3.0 GHz  (Source: AMD, AnandTech)

A shot of the Windows Vista system properties screen, with Phenom running at 3.0 GHz  (Source: AMD, AnandTech)
AMD dismisses claims that it's quad-core architecture can't ramp clock frequency

To kick off AMD's Analyst Day at the company's Sunnyvale, California headquarters, AMD demonstrated a system running on a quad-core desktop 3.0 GHz processor.  The processor, codenamed Agena, will be the flagship AMD high-end offering.

The system used standard cooling, though company officials would not disclose how much power the system consumed. In addition to the unannounced processor, the system also included a three-way CrossFire configuration.  Two ATI Radeon HD 2900 graphics adaptors provided video acceleration for the system; the third, we were told, provided physics support for the demonstration.

AMD made two systems running the Agena processors available for media to play select games.  The company would not let anyone view the system properties details, but sent the two featured images to press beforehand.

AMD's quad-core Opteron launch, slated for later this summer, is expected to debut at 2.0 GHz.  Company roadmaps ramped this clock frequency launch down several times -- the company's original roadmap launch plans indicated we would see a 2.6 GHz processor at launch.

An AMD engineer, speaking on terms of anonymity, claimed to DailyTech that the company took on several unplanned respins for the K10-family.  "We ramped the spin aggressively.  It's going to bring the clock frequencies we need for the desktop," he said.

The company would not comment on when the 3.0 GHz Phenom-based processor would debut, though the company has previously indicated Phenom will ship for volume by the 2007 holiday season.

Update 7/31/2007: According toThe Inquirer, Charlie Demerjian was allowed to confirm the system core frequency was 3.0 GHz from the system BIOS. 


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RE: Good to see finally
By Mattz0r on 7/26/2007 6:13:32 PM , Rating: -1
I'm still skeptical on that Tri-fire setup. Mainly because the third card isn't connected at all by any form of Crossfire bridge (at least, not one that's visible); although this could be done through the motherboard, I've yet to hear of something like that working on a high-bandwidth card like the 2900XT.


RE: Good to see finally
By johnsonx on 7/27/2007 12:15:02 PM , Rating: 3
If you'd RTFA, you'd know the 3rd card is for physics. No bridge needed, since it has nothing to do with the display and doesn't talk to the other two cards.


RE: Good to see finally
By Martimus on 7/28/2007 9:09:57 AM , Rating: 2
There is a bridge, but it isn't visible (like you said) The bridge is in the front behind the "wall of fans" in the picture.

http://www.firingsquad.com/news/newsarticle.asp?se...


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