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Honda Odyssey

Honda Pilot

Honda Ridgeline
Honda to introduce a new 3.5 liter V6 diesel by 2010

While many domestic and foreign automakers are looking to hybrid technology to improve fuel efficiency across their auto lines, Honda is looking towards the tried and true: diesel engines.

It was reported last month that the next generation Honda Accord would forgo its slow-selling and poor-performing Accord Hybrid with a diesel variant. The oil-burning Honda Accord will feature a 2.2 liter i-CTDi Tier 2 Bin 5 diesel engine along with an ammonia-filled catalytic converter to reduce NOx emissions.

Honda is also poised to make a new 3.5 liter V6 diesel engine available for its larger vehicles including the Odyssey minivan, Pilot mid-sized SUV and the Ridgeline mid-sized pickup truck. The new Tier 2 Bin 5 diesel will first be available in 2010 according to the Japanese Nikkei newspaper.

The engine is said to be 30 percent more fuel efficient than Honda's current 3.5 liter V6 gasoline engine (rated at 17/24, 15/20 and 15/20 respectively in the Odyssey, Pilot and Ridgeline based on 2008 EPA estimates). The new motor is also said to produce 20 percent less carbon dioxide as the 3.5 liter V6 gasoline engine.

Honda's new diesels likely won't come under as much scrutiny for failure to achieve EPA estimates as has been the case with hybrids. Honda knows this first-hand as it recently became the target of a class-action lawsuit regarding poor fuel economy on the Civic Hybrid.



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RE: It amuses me
By Andrwken on 7/11/2007 1:07:04 PM , Rating: 2
The new 6.4l powerstrokes as of this year are much quieter. The problem with them is they had to increase the front grille and radiator by 20% to accomodate more heat dissipation. I don't know about anyone else, but to need that much more cooling on a refresh of an existing motor tells me they may be pushing the envelope of that design with that much power. Or, they have a design flaw. It should not run that hot. The dual turbocharger may have something to do with it.


RE: It amuses me
By bhieb on 7/11/2007 1:49:59 PM , Rating: 2
Correct me if I'm wrong, but it is probably due to the ultra-low sulphur fuel requirements. The engine has to reburn the exahust then run it through a catalyst. All this adds heat to the engine. Not saying it couldn't be done differently, but with turbos and all the exahaust temp would be outrageous.


RE: It amuses me
By Andrwken on 7/11/2007 2:01:54 PM , Rating: 2
That could very well be the case, but, they do not have the same stringent requirement due to being only sold in heavy duty class trucks, therefore get exemptions from the government on fuel and emissions. Any vehicle over 8600 lbs. gvwr is exempt from the most stringent standards. So if Ford went ultra low emmission on this motor, good for them. But I doubt it as they can't package it to the size of vehicles that could benefit from it.


RE: It amuses me
By mongrelchild on 7/11/2007 2:03:08 PM , Rating: 2
EGR actually lowers combustion temperature slightly. Just sayin ;)


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