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Former ATI president and CEO resigns from AMD

AMD today announced Dave Orton, executive vice president of AMD, has resigned. The resignation is effective in the end of July 2007. Orton was the former president and chief executive officer of ATI before the merger with AMD. A new executive vice president has not been appointed yet.

“It is with mixed feelings that I am leaving AMD,” Orton said. “I am very optimistic about AMD’s future. I believe strongly in the strategies that brought AMD and ATI together and the talented employees of the ‘new AMD’ who are committed to winning in the market by delivering the best possible solutions for customers.”

Orton was one of the “key drivers in the successful integration of AMD and ATI,” according to AMD President and Chief Operating Officer Dirk Meyer. “With his integration work complete and the successful launch of key graphics and chipset products earlier this year, the time was right for Dave to take his personal and professional life in a different direction,” he added.

Despite the “successful integration” of AMD and ATI, the company continues to hemorrhage cash, with debts mounting up fast and an estimated $1.1 billion in the bank. The company also posted a first quarter loss of $611 million USD.  



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RE: wa
By TSS on 7/11/2007 1:49:25 PM , Rating: 2
i'd think that intel doesn't want to completly kill off AMD since beeing a monopolist isn't exactly benificiairy at present, definatly not with the EC lingering about. it'd be hard to imagine, in any case, that both intel's and AMD's strategy's for the long term are anything but complicated.

there is the problem of cache sizes though, and more importantly what it does for intel. if the cache's are equal, then the chips would perform similar. it might even happen that the core2duo would perform worse then the good ol' AMD64. but their not, and intel has of yet crammed alot of cache into their chips simply because they can with the scale of chips their on. the point beeing however that once the IMC is used by intel aswell the cache sizes can decrease dramaticly (the reason why amd doesnt really function alot better with more cache) and more area can be used for say computing power or it can be left off to increase profits. or, keep the profit the same and sell at a lower price.

now i dont have much besides logic to help me out here, so i could very well be wrong. i don't have a clue how much space a IMC takes up on the die either. but i'd figure it's less then the ridicolous amount of cache intel is adding. in any case, the way a IMC affects AMD may be different from what we think.

the decicive battle won't be fought this year in any case. if i'd have to guess which point in time will be critical for either compagny, it'll be what AMD's move is going to be after barcelona. once barcelona's up and running and the refresh comes about to take on nehalem, it'll be more like it is now. but if the next CPU that needs to take on the nehalem refresh dissapoints, and this is just a matter of *hom much*, AMD might be done for.

but i do belive then it will be because of their own fault, not intel's. AMD has shown more then once in the past how to improve performance by creative thinking, and i'd like to think they can do it again. but you can't blame the competition if you lost by lack of innovation.


"Google fired a shot heard 'round the world, and now a second American company has answered the call to defend the rights of the Chinese people." -- Rep. Christopher H. Smith (R-N.J.)

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