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New York police department is working on setting up license plate readers and cameras throughout Lower Manhattan

New York will soon follow in the footsteps of London’s “ring of steel” by implementing its own Lower Manhattan Security Initiative, reported CNET.  The security initiative will have more than 100 cameras that will monitor cars through Lower Manhattan. 

London's ring of steel entails a network of cameras and roadblocks that are designed to track and deter terrorists.  The images captured by officials have aided in the tracking of suspects of previous threats.

New York's police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, stated last week that department has obtained $25 million toward the project, yet the estimated cost of the plan reaches a hefty $90 million.  Roughly $15 million came from Homeland Security grants and another $10 million came from the city.  At this point, Kelly states that there are enough funds to install roughly 116 license plate readers in fixed and mobile locations over the next few months.

"This area is very critical to the economic lifeblood of this nation," said Kelly in an interview last week with CNET. "We want to make it less vulnerable."

If fully financed, the project will include license plate readers and 3,000 public and private cameras below Canal Street.  There will also be a center staffed by police and private security officers, and roadblocks.

As of now, the license plate readers have been ordered, and the program is still waiting on more funding, hopefully from federal grants.  The entire operation is expected to be in place and running by 2010.



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RE: NYPD - The New "Ministry of Love"?
By stromgald on 7/10/2007 3:48:09 PM , Rating: 5
Why do you need 'freedom of privacy' in a public place? These cameras are not being pointed in windows or houses. They're pointed at city streets and sidewalks. The Fourth amendment prohibits searches, arrests, and seizures of property without just cause. Unless you want to consider this 'searching', I don't see how this is unconstitutional.


By 91TTZ on 7/11/2007 12:19:37 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Why do you need 'freedom of privacy' in a public place? These cameras are not being pointed in windows or houses. They're pointed at city streets and sidewalks. The Fourth amendment prohibits searches, arrests, and seizures of property without just cause. Unless you want to consider this 'searching', I don't see how this is unconstitutional.


The government has already eroded the protection that the 4th amendment offered us.

Now they can pretty much search you whenever they want, with no probably cause, and they'll claim that what they're doing doesn't violate the 4th amendment.

For instance, have you ever been stuck at a checkpoint that the police have set up on the road? They'll search all the cars going through the checkpoint, even though those people weren't stopped based on any probable cause of wrongdoing. If you dare to turn around to avoid the nuisance, you'll surely be pulled over for "suspicious behavior". Either way, in essence you're forced to prove your innocence which goes against the basic philosophy of US law.


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