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AMD puts second-generation "Stars" plans on its roadmap, now with more celestial names

AMD’s latest roadmap outlines plans for second-generation Stars quad, dual and single-core processors. Five second-generation Stars processors are in the pipeline for 2H’2008. The five variants include quad-core Deneb FX and Deneb, dual-core Propus and Regor, and single-core Sargas. The new processors drop into new Socket AM3 and AM2+ motherboards for backwards compatibility.

All second-generation Stars processors have new memory controllers with DDR3 and DDR2 memory compatibility. Taking advantage of DDR3 memory requires the use of a Socket AM3 motherboard. Socket AM2+ users can upgrade to second-generation Stars processors with a memory bandwidth penalty.

Second-generation Stars processors introduce AMD’s 45nm fabrication process. AMD plans to make a quick move to 45nm. The entire product lineup will move to 45nm within 2H’2008, unlike the move to 65nm, which began Q4’2006 and is still in process.

Succeeding Agena FX and Agena processors are the Deneb FX and Deneb cores. AMD has not set any specific details such as cache configuration or HyperTransport speeds yet. However, Deneb FX and Deneb processors will carry on with shared L3 caches and HyperTransport 3.0. AMD will offer Deneb FX in Socket AM2+/AM3 and land-grid array 1207+ socket configurations. Expect Deneb FX and Deneb cores to carry the Phenom FX and Phenom X4 names.

AMD’s Propus replaces Kuma in 2H’2008. Propus shares the same feature set as Kuma such as HyperTransport 3.0 and shared L3, however, specific cache sizes are unset. Expect Propus to continue with the Phenom X2 brand.

The AMD Athlon X2 Rana processor will have a short life span. AMD expects to debut the 65nm entry-level dual-core processor in 1H’2008 and replace it in 2H’2008 with Regor. Spica will face the same fate as Rana.

The single-core Spica has a half-year life cycle before Sargas in 2H’2008 replaces it. Expect Regor to carry the Athlon X2 name while Sargas carries the Sempron name. Features of the value AMD processors should be no different from its predecessors, with the exception of DDR3 memory support.


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RE: Show something
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 7/3/2007 5:26:54 PM , Rating: 2
I've not read or heard anything that would indicate anyone has a chip at 2.3 GHz.


RE: Show something
By Justin Case on 7/26/2007 9:05:44 PM , Rating: 2
Well, I take this article...

http://www.dailytech.com/AMD+Demonstrates+30+GHz+Q...

...to mean that now you have read or heard something about chips running at 2.3 GHz (and higher)...? :)

Like I said, they're just not economically viable (yet). But some select partners have had access to them for a while.


RE: Show something
By KristopherKubicki (blog) on 8/1/2007 5:13:07 AM , Rating: 2
There's a three week differential between your comment and mine.


RE: Show something
By Justin Case on 8/3/2007 2:33:56 AM , Rating: 2
In other words you're saying that DailyTech is 3 weeks behind the loop? Or what are you saying, exactly?

Three weeks ago I mentioned that 2.3 GHz Barcelona samples were making the rounds. You decided to post a message saying you had no information about the existence of such chips. Since I hadn't asked if you had any information (and my post wasn't even a reply to something you had written), the only way to interpret your post is as challenging my statement.

So (three weeks later, indeed) I asked if now (that AMD has demonstrated 3 GHz chips publicly) you are aware of chips running at (more than) 2.3 GHz. Yes, it's a rethoric question, but so was your "reply to a non-existent question", above it.

And maybe you'll agree that if AMD can publicly demonstrate 3 GHz CPUs today, running games on Windows, they probably had 2.3 GHz samples capable of running standard CPU benchmarks three weeks ago, no? I don't think even Intel would manage to ramp CPU speed by 80% in just three weeks (30% is impressive enough, although we're not talking about high yields)...

Maybe when someone posts about something that you are not aware of, you shouldn't be so quick to pull rank and say "I've not read or heard anything that would indicate that's true". Unless someone actually asks if you have, of course.


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