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Nearly one in every three Xbox 360 consoles fail, according to retailer reports

By several metrics, the Xbox 360 is the most successful console so far of this generation. Despite the startling pace of the Wii, the Xbox 360 still has the most consoles sold worldwide and the longest list of games and exclusives. For a gamer looking for online-enabled high-definition gaming today, the Xbox 360 appears to satisfy those needs.

One often overlooked factor when considering a console purchase is reliability, an area that is apparently where the Xbox 360 falls short. Anecdotal evidence is heavily pointing to Microsoft’s latest console as being significantly more prone to failure than what consumers are accustomed to.

Microsoft has said before that its Xbox 360 failure rate falls within three to five percent, what it believes to be well within industry standards. Internet reports from Xbox 360 owners, however, suggest that the failure rate is much higher than that.

In an effort to gain a more accurate picture of Xbox 360 failure rate, DailyTech decided to poll retail outlets that sell the Xbox 360 and with it the option to purchase an in-store extended warranty. Out of all Xbox 360 extended warranties sold, we wanted to know how many were claimed by consumers with defective consoles, thus giving us a more accurate failures percentage.

After contacting several retailers from various regions in North America, the responses were unanimous: the Xbox 360 is the least reliable gaming console in recent history. Current EB Games or GameStop employees who offered information did so under strict anonymity, as it is against company policy to reveal such information to the public. Furthermore, our sources confirmed that EB Games revised its Canadian warranty policies during early 2007 for consoles solely due to the failure rate of the Xbox 360.

EB Games held conference calls for its Canadian stores informing them of the new policy changes and revealing alarming failure rates of the Xbox 360. “The real numbers were between 30 to 33 percent,” said former EB Games employee Matthieu G., adding that failure rate was even greater for launch consoles. “We had 35 Xbox 360s at launch I know more than half of them broke within the first six months (red lights or making circles under the game discs). Two of them were dead on arrival.”

Interestingly, Microsoft has acknowledged that the initial batch of Xbox 360 consoles made during the launch window suffer from below average reliability. In response to an overwhelming defect rate of launch consoles, Microsoft agreed to repair all machines manufactured in 2005 free of charge, and issue a refund for those who already paid for repairs of launch units up until January 1, 2006.

The three flashing red lights – commonly referred to in gaming communities as the “Red Ring of Death” – is a sign of an Xbox 360 hardware failure. The sign is apparently common enough that Microsoft has added an option to its 1-800-4MY-XBOX support line that names “three flashing red lights” specifically.

As a result of the high failure rate of the Xbox 360, EB Games corporate nearly doubled the prices of its one-year, over-the-counter warranty. While the previous warranty would give a customer a brand new console in exchange for the broken one, the new policy now states that the customer will receive a refurbished console instead. The move was made because it was becoming too costly for the retailer to give the customer a brand-new machine, which still carries a store cost close to the MSRP. The price increase and policy change wasn’t exclusive to only the Xbox 360, however, as it also applies to all other Sony and Nintendo consoles sold.

The failure rate nearing a third of all Xbox 360 consoles was found at other retailers too. A Best Buy customer service department manager, who wished to remain unnamed, said that failure rates for the console were “between a quarter to a third” of all units sold.

“We see a ton of [Xbox 360s] come back all the time. We strongly push our customers to buy our service plans no matter what they buy, but it is especially important for them with the Xbox 360,” said the manager. “It’s a lucky thing for us that Microsoft extended the factory warranty to one year, because we were having a hell of a time dealing with the launch units. Now we don’t have to deal with those broken [Xbox 360s] until their second year, for those who have purchased the two year plans.”

In late 2006, Microsoft boosted the warranty of all Xbox 360 consoles to one year, up from 90-days previously. For gamers who are out of warranty, however, a replacement or repair will cost Xbox 360 customers $140.

When compared against other systems, the Xbox 360 is failing at higher rates than its current competitors and predecessors. Former EB Games worker Matthieu G. said that the failure rates for all other consoles were not high enough for the retailer to consider revising its policies, and guesses that most other console systems have a failure rate of less than one percent, including the PlayStation 3. Another EB Games manager, when asked if the store warranty was worth it, conceded that in the hundreds of Wii units sold at that location thus far, zero have come back as defective.

Despite the overwhelming evidence that the Xbox 360 is a relatively unreliable games machine, Microsoft officials refuse to comment on its failure rate. Peter Moore, VP of Microsoft’s entertainment division, said to the Mercury News, “I can’t comment on failure rates, because it’s just not something  – it’s a moving target. What this consumer should worry about is the way that we’ve treated him. Y’know, things break, and if we’ve treated him well and fixed his problem, that’s something that we’re focused on right now. I’m not going to comment on individual failure rates because I’m shipping in 36 countries and it’s a complex business.”

Similar questions regarding the Xbox 360 hardware met with the man responsible for the design of the console, Todd Holmdahl. He too sidestepped the issue with the Mercury News, saying, “I would say we don’t have a high defect rate. The vast majority of people are really excited about their product, and that we are targeting profitability for next year.”

Asked differently about whether or not the Xbox 360 falls into the ‘normal’ three to five percent return rate, Holmdahl said, “We don’t disclose the actual number,” and “We don’t comment on that.”

No piece of technology, no matter how well designed, should be expected to completely free of failure. The key metric is whether or not a product falls within industry standards of acceptable failure rates – and from findings based off retailer-supported warranty returns, the actual rate of failures could be six to ten times greater than what Microsoft is letting on.

Regardless of what the actual failure rate is, there is consumer perception that the Xbox 360 is a less reliable machine than its competitors. That fact alone should encourage Microsoft to do more than just avoid all comments on failures and only preach on the wonderful experience of its consumer base.





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Boring
By mdogs444 on 7/2/2007 9:15:41 AM , Rating: -1
As true as all this is, its not something new, nor is it something that we're surprised at.

For several months, we've been bashing on MS for the failure rates & sending us back refurbs. No doubt this is a quality issue with hardware, compatibility, Q/A, software, or several of the above.

For several months, we've also been bashing on Sony for the price of the PS3, the limited number of quality games, their executives attitudes towards their buyers.

We've all agreed that the Wii has the best price:performance ratio, especially considering its the only game console we consider to be in our "price range". But we've also bashed its flaws as well. No HDMI, No HD, and mostly Nintendo proprietary games - because the graphics limited system just doesn't cut it for our shooters & racing games.

I think with the emergence of PC performance, power, and dropping costs - its plain to see that "console gaming" is just not as efficient as "pc gaming". Perhaps this is the way to go from now on - we dont NEED 8800 video cards, 4GB of ram, raptor drives, or Quad Core overclocked processors. Those are for bragging rights, so dont get me started.

But the average person can build something w/ an AMD/Intel dual core processor, PCI motherboard, 1-2GB DDR2 memory, a 7300/7600/8500/8600 video card, and a widescreen monitor for probably close to the price of a PS3 &/or 360 with their needed accessories.

To me, console gaming is more for:
1. When you have more than one player
2. You want to use a 50" screen, because 18" away from a 22" WS isnt enough (lol)
3. Because mommy won't let you lock yourself in your bedroom and she needs to monitor your activities.

A PC also gives you the ability to upgrade to the play the newer games - no reason to take it, toss it in the corner to collect dust, and buy an all new one.

After all, this is just my opinion. Not meaning to look down on console gamers, or look up on PC gamers. Im just an average 28 yr old who is getting tired of complaining about each product out there. We know they have problems, we've known this for a long time. For all those who bought 1st gen systems, well you should have known what you were getting before hand. We dont buy 1st gen electronics in anything and not expect problems. For those who have bought recently and are experiencing issues, im in agreement that it sucks and this shouldnt happen - but these issues have been out there and known for a long time now. I dont agree with whats happening, but the solution is simple....

If you cannot deal with it, then dont buy it.




RE: Boring
By spluurfg on 7/2/2007 9:49:56 AM , Rating: 5
Uh... If we can't deal with what exactly? High failure rates on products? Microsoft doesn't exactly warn the consumer that there is a high rate of failure on the Xbox 360 (in fact, they refuse to disclose this), so how is the consumer supposed to know what they are getting into? If I pay money for a product, I expect that it will work, or that the company will take the necessary steps to replace it.

quote:
Im just an average 28 yr old who is getting tired of complaining about each product out there. We know they have problems, we've known this for a long time. For all those who bought 1st gen systems, well you should have known what you were getting before hand. We dont buy 1st gen electronics in anything and not expect problems.


Nobody forces you to read other people's problems with their purchases, and this sort of journalism is interesting not just from a hardware perspective, but it is also revealing about MS as a company. Besides, the XBOX 360 is their second generation console...


RE: Boring
By mdogs444 on 7/2/2007 10:27:27 AM , Rating: 3
What im referring to - specifically in the 360 case - is that its problems: Red ring of death, refurbs being sent back, warranty issues, etc have been out in the media for quite some time - blogs, forums, the news, etc. Its no secret that the system is having issues, worldwide. I feel bad for the people who dont research a product before they buy it.

The 360 may be they 2nd console, but its not technically a 2nd gen or revision. Its all new hardware, software, etc. Nothing about the 360 is the same as the old Xbox.

When i said about people buying first gen, i was referring to buying the first revision of the console, being sold when it first came out. No one would have been able to know it had issues, and those are the people who got majorly screwed.

Since then, the issues have been widely known, and those who choose to purchase the product do so knowing that something COULD occur to it.

No where in my post did i defend MS, Sony, or any other manufacturer for their poor business ethics. But in today's age, a company would never disclose that there is something wrong w/ what they are trying to sell. Its just common sense.

So to counter that from a buyers perspective, we cannot just buy things and expect someone to fix if it breaks. We must do our due diligence and research what we are buying - to minimize the possibility of problems down the road.

This goes for more than just games, think of it as it pertains to cars. Wouldn't you do a great deal of research into the quality of a car before you purchase?


RE: Boring
By UppityMatt on 7/2/2007 12:05:44 PM , Rating: 3
I think the main problem with your post is that you turned a piece of investigative journalism into some rant about not buying the products of the companies.
"If you cannot deal with it, then dont buy it."

Then you go on to say

"This goes for more than just games, think of it as it pertains to cars. Wouldn't you do a great deal of research into the quality of a car before you purchase?"

What do you think this entire article is about??? its informing the public about a high defect rate so they are aware of issues. Why do you even post here?


RE: Boring
By mdogs444 on 7/2/2007 12:31:45 PM , Rating: 2
The article is throwing out numbers & figures (accurate or not, we dont know), but they aren't telling us anyhting we dont know - regardless of what MS tells us. You hear stories of someone on their 11th 360, others who have friends in which 5 out of 6 have broken, etc. We know the defect rate is extremely high (1/3rd i think may be exaggerating though).


RE: Boring
By spluurfg on 7/2/2007 7:11:28 PM , Rating: 2
I suppose I can see your point that it's always buyer beware, but not everybody expects such high failure rates from such 'reputable' companies. Sure, there's always the 'you should have googled it' answer, and maybe we've heard enough of it, but I think this kind of investigative journalism is very worthwhile to get the message across. It doesn't bash, and it doesn't interpret too much -- learning about failure rates from retailers seems pretty reasonable.

The only thing I can question in the study is whether consumers with an extended warranty would have a predisposition towards claiming faults that were either user error or fairly minor... though even with a fairly generous margin of error, the failure rate still seems very high.


RE: Boring
By One43637 on 7/2/2007 2:40:02 PM , Rating: 3
^^ my sentiments exactly.

On a related note, my 360 failed on me this past Saturday. Well ventilated, not enclosed, and it wasn't even a hot day when it happened.

The rep said my 1 year expired on June 24th. That's just great manufacturing there. 1 year and 6 days and it just dies.


RE: Boring
By leexgx on 7/2/2007 4:49:08 PM , Rating: 2
i guess every one should just brake there xbox 2-4 weeks before there 1yr runs out just to make sure thay get an replacement before it turns into an Fujtisu hard drive (TIME/TINY computers used them and thay would have 80% chance of it failing after 1yr thay never failed in warranty) problem with Xbox 360 its Very random there is no time line to when it fail you cant prediect whe its going to fail

the Xbox 360 is the Most unreliable console Ever made and the EU/US (or what ever corp deals with it) should Fine/tell them to fix the Xbox 360 as it does not Fall under norm Failed hardware use and an free replace ment should happen

what makes the Xbox fail any way ? is the heat-sink bending the board Overheating is not always the problem as users posting Red Ring Of Death (M$ need to add that to there Automated service line i have tryed ;) ) when its cooled as well thay still seem to fail


RE: Boring
By TSS on 7/2/2007 5:22:58 PM , Rating: 2
my best guess would be that it's microsoft. might sound like microsoft bashing but it isn't (though i'm definatly not a fan of MS).

MS is a software compagny, first and foremost. they started with an operating system, build a few applications for that system, eventually went over to game code... all fine... and then they design and build a console. now, ms is smart enoguh to hire some good personell (god knows they have the money for it) but you can't buy experience.

nintendo has been making consoles for decades now (with enough failures along the road to learn) while sony has been very active in consumer electronics. MS does nothing hardware orientated or very little in any case. they can program for it, but building it is a different matter. which we all saw with the first xbox which also crashed alot during the first week it was launched. and those where generic components, these are more specialized. that and even in the software field MS isn't exactly known for their reliability.

it's just the way MS does buisness, lie and hope the majority of consumers don't care enough to stop buying their products.


RE: Boring
By Acid Rain on 7/2/2007 9:54:47 AM , Rating: 5
I strongly disagree.

The inherit advantage of having a specific hardware and software to develop for is over-whelming. While on PC many obsticles take there toll on prformance:
1. ever increasing need for compatibility with older and newer ,rapidly changing graphic standards.
2. computability and tunning for different vendors and generations of CPUs.
3. all other hardware factors - sound, display size, display resolution etc etc.
4. running on a sub optimal OS compared to game consoles light-weight OS.
5. running on different OSs.

The bottom line is that game console have consistent good value in term of game performance - if I look at the best looking PS2 games today - It's hard to believe this console came out 7 years ago. the best computer 7 years ago would have been abandoned by game developers long ago or not look nearly as good/be playable, and would cost you many time more.


RE: Boring
By Proteusza on 7/2/2007 10:33:51 AM , Rating: 2
A machine built entirely for games is always going to be better than one that was really built for the office.

The advantage with the is the compatibility and wide range of uses, but that comes with its price - expensive hardware and slower performance, and use of x86 when we should have abandoned it long ago.


RE: Boring
By sdsdv10 on 7/2/2007 4:01:50 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
...and use of x86 when we should have abandoned it long ago.


Just curious. Why do you think that?


RE: Boring
By BMFPitt on 7/2/2007 11:07:14 AM , Rating: 3
I'm an avid PC gamer, and I have to say that your comments are completely unrealistic. At 7300 for a gaming machine? You'd be lucky to play year or two old titles on that. The fact is that if you have a console's price worth of money, you can't build a PC that can play the same quality games - and do it for the next 5 years. You also can't easily plug it into your TV, pop a disc in, and just play (though it's much closer to that now than it was 2 years ago.)

If you want to spend money on a machine that is only for games, buy a console. If you want the best experience and highest quality graphics, get a PC - but it'll cost you at least twice as much over the life of a console. Now if you want a PC to do other stuff, that has to be factored in as well. You're then only comparing the cost of making your Internet & email PC into something that can play games. This brings the cost closer, but only to about the point where it breaks even.

At this point really comes down to the games you want to play. I prefer to play sports or racing games on a console, while I play shooters or RTS games on a PC.


RE: Boring
By murphyslabrat on 7/2/2007 3:32:45 PM , Rating: 2
I disagree. While the X-Box 360 is more powerful for the money, you can buy an equivelant PC for about $200 more, self-built mind you, and have a much more versatile experience, and that is including a Radeon X1950 PRO or a GeForce 8600 GTS(I just did a quick virtual system build on NewEgg.com to check).

With that you can "easily plug it into the TV and play" via the S-Video/component out. You can also edit music/vdeos/pictures, run a wide variety of games, use heavy-footprint office-suites, and the list goes on.

Essentially, aside from multiple players on one "unit", there is nothing a console can do that a PC cannot. Also, this generation of consoles is nowhere near as far ahead of PC's as the PS2 was....That was one of the greatest deals in recent history, heck we still regularly have Soul Calibre III tournaments.

[nitpicking]Oh, and many modern games will run on a GeForce 7300, but that is with all the settings on lowest and a framerate of 30-70fps. While I, personally, would not want to run any games on a 7300, it is still(for some people) enjoyable.[/nitpicking]

Peace,
Sam Hughes

P.S. I don't know if the 360 does HD/Blu-Ray discs like the PS3, but if it does then that is one thing my "equivelant PC" could not do.


RE: Boring
By BMFPitt on 7/2/2007 4:04:27 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I disagree. While the X-Box 360 is more powerful for the money, you can buy an equivelant PC for about $200 more, self-built mind you, and have a much more versatile experience
Just like I said, except without the caveat that in 5 years XBox360/PS3/Wii will still play the latest games made for their respective platforms. Find me a 5 year old PC that will run a game made in 2007. It'll cost at least $200-300 to bring it up to minimum standards, coming out to just about double the cost of a console for the use period (just as I said.)
quote:
With that you can "easily plug it into the TV and play" via the S-Video/component out. You can also edit music/vdeos/pictures, run a wide variety of games, use heavy-footprint office-suites, and the list goes on.
Not on my TV. There has been a massive improvement with the nVidia drivers over the last 2-3 years as far as TV connectivity, but I still lose about 5% of my screen space (and I kind of need that Start Menu) when I plug it into my TV.
quote:
Essentially, aside from multiple players on one "unit", there is nothing a console can do that a PC cannot.
It can remain a uniform development platform for a long period of time.
quote:
P.S. I don't know if the 360 does HD/Blu-Ray discs like the PS3, but if it does then that is one thing my "equivelant PC" could not do.
It needs a $200 add-on. The same one works on PCs, and is the cheapest HD-DVD player available right now.


RE: Boring
By nemrod on 7/2/2007 4:59:26 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just like I said, except without the caveat that in 5 years XBox360/PS3/Wii will still play the latest games made for their respective platforms. Find me a 5 year old PC that will run a game made in 2007. It'll cost at least $200-300 to bring it up to minimum standards, coming out to just about double the cost of a console for the use period (just as I said.)


Apparently, the most difficult would be to find a 5 years old xbox360... If you have to buy a new one every year, this will cost much more than pc...


RE: Boring
By leexgx on 7/2/2007 5:21:49 PM , Rating: 2
i have to agree with nemrod post i guess at best you probly have to buy an new Xbox 360 every 2 yrs (unless you got 2yr ext on it)

after the first year its Pot luck when it fail and its not If its When it will do the Red ring of death


RE: Boring
By emboss on 7/3/2007 1:21:47 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Just like I said, except without the caveat that in 5 years XBox360/PS3/Wii will still play the latest games made for their respective platforms. Find me a 5 year old PC that will run a game made in 2007.


Lots of PCs will if you turn the settings down - which is effectively what is being forced on a console.

The graphics on a 5 year old console will look terrible compared to current games on current PC's, but probably prety close to the PC games with the settings cranked down enough to run on a 5 year old system.


RE: Boring
By BMFPitt on 7/3/2007 11:13:08 AM , Rating: 2
My secondary computer dates to mid 2003, so around 4 years old right now. Athlon 2600, 512MB (later 1GB), 40GB HDD (later added 250GB), nVidia 5600GT (later 6600 GT), and a 20" CRT. Paid around $900 at the time, added about $400 over the years. In the interest of fairness, we'll exclude the cost of the monitor and the extra HDD since they wouldn't be needed for a console, which brings the cost of ownership to ~$1000. That was for a service life of about 3 years (and I would be due for another graphics card about now if it was still my main box.)

We all agree that at best, a console in its prime is no better than equal the performance of a PC, but for any realistic assessment of cost vs. performance for a gaming-only machine, the console is the better value. Also consider that the vast majority of people are not DT readers, and the thought of opening up their PC case terrifies them.


RE: Boring
By MeTaedet on 7/3/2007 12:18:37 AM , Rating: 2
The problem with this, though, is that if you create a PC with precisely the same technical specs as the XBox 360, you still aren't going to have games with the same graphical quality, since a great deal of the total system resources of a PC are being horded by inefficient Windows processes (and even if they weren't inefficient...). You can't compare the specs of a console to the specs of a PC and argue directly from those numbers without taking into account the all the overhead of a PC OS.

For example, the Playstation can manage some pretty damn good graphics at times, but if you were to make a PC with the same technical specs, you certainly wouldn't be able to run any relatively recent version of Windows on it, let alone run Windows and play a Playstation game.

So, in summary, I sincerely doubt that you could build a PC at a price $200 greater than that of the XBox 360 and be able to play games of comparable graphical quality.

Also, as others have mentioned, if you spend just enough money building a PC to be able to play current games, within no time at all, you are going to have a hunk of junk with which you can't do anything but replay old games. In order to have something with a lifespan comparable to that of a console, you would have to spend at least $2000, I would imagine.


RE: Boring
By dubldwn on 7/3/2007 12:58:10 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
So, in summary, I sincerely doubt that you could build a PC at a price $200 greater than that of the XBox 360 and be able to play games of comparable graphical quality.

CPU $165 e6320
RAM $40 1GB DDR-2 667
BOARD $80 650i
GPU $155 x1950xt
DRIVE $20 lite-on
PSU/CASE $50 450W
OS $90 XP

TOTAL: $600


RE: Boring
By dubldwn on 7/3/2007 1:06:04 PM , Rating: 2
I didn't add the hard drive, because how many of those do you have laying around your kitchen?


RE: Boring
By wallijonn on 7/5/2007 1:21:52 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
I sincerely doubt that you could build a PC at a price $200 greater than that of the XBox 360 and be able to play games of comparable graphical quality.


Have you looked at the amount of floor and shelf space dedicated to console and PC games? The PC real estate has been shrinking every few months, to where whole walls are dedicated to consoles and maybe a shelf or two to PC games. There are more console games than PC games produced. So, it wouldn't really matter if the PC has the graphical advantage if there are fewer games for it.

To me, it seems that PC gaming has been dying a slow death and now with Vista it is on life support. Just my opinion.


RE: Boring
By SigmaHyperion on 7/5/2007 6:58:57 PM , Rating: 2
Unfortunately, that's a faulty assumption.

There's a reduction of floorspace for PC games in stores for 2 reasons:
1> GameStop/EBGames/etc make the vast majority of their money on the sale of used games not new ones. They've never been able to effectively sell used PC games, therefore there's not a lot of reason for them to carry the new ones when that space is much better used for carrying profit-laden used ones from other platforms.

2> PC gamers are much more likely to buy their games online for delivery than console gamers. Brick-and-mortar sales just aren't there for PC games. And it gets lower and lower every year as direct-downloading becomes a more popular option.

All you've got to do is take a look at the upcoming titles list by platform to see that the PC still dominates in sheer number of titles released. Significantly lower entry hurdles ensure there's a steady flow of newly released titles; even if, admittedly, a lot are crap.

In terms of sheer dollars, in 2006 Retail PC Game sales were just a tad under $1 Billion. The total Retail (not used) Game sales for all other (non-portable) platforms was $4.5 Billion. So, compared to all console gaming, the PC only makes up about 20% of the market (still a LOT more than you'd think by looking in a GameStop). But, in reality, that $4.5B was spread over the GameCube, Wii, Xbox, 360, PS2, and (to a much lesser extent as it was new) the PS3. Only the PS2 actually generated more retail games sales dollars than the PC.

Bottom-Line: Platform for Platform, sales of PC games are still very, very strong.


RE: Boring
By murphyslabrat on 7/2/2007 3:51:16 PM , Rating: 2
I disagree. While the X-Box 360 is more powerful for the money, you can buy an equivelant PC for about $200 more, self-built mind you, and have a much more versatile experience, and that is including a Radeon X1950 PRO or a GeForce 8600 GTS(I just did a quick virtual system build on NewEgg.com to check).

With that you can "easily plug it into the TV and play" via the S-Video/component out. You can also edit music/vdeos/pictures, run a wide variety of games, use heavy-footprint office-suites, and the list goes on.

Essentially, aside from multiple players on one "unit", there is nothing a console can do that a PC cannot. Also, this generation of consoles is nowhere near as far ahead of PC's as the PS2 was....That was one of the greatest deals in recent history, heck we still regularly have Soul Calibre III tournaments.

[nitpicking]Oh, and many modern games will run on a GeForce 7300, but that is with all the settings on lowest and a framerate of 30-70fps. While I, personally, would not want to run any games on a 7300, it is still(for some people) enjoyable.[/nitpicking]

Peace,
Sam Hughes

P.S. I don't know if the 360 does HD/Blu-Ray discs like the PS3, but if it does then that is one thing my "equivelant PC" could not do.


RE: Boring
By Supersonic3474 on 7/2/2007 5:18:54 PM , Rating: 2
I heavily disagree with you, take $1000 and you may end up with a PC that can display graphics close to that of the 360 at $400. And console gaming doesn't require a $600 video card every 2 years. The money you throw at your PC to get it up to snuff is insane. CPU, RAM, MOBO, Video, HDD. You are looking at some serious money there. You pay just $10 on average more for a 360 games than you do a PC game, and you don't have to worry about the bastard crashing constantly especially if you have that piece of garbage VISTA! err how in the world is PC Gaming better, no standard control scheme, NUTZO! no one wants to take their Standard machines and shell out $500 for a video card for their $500 PC. You end up loosing a ton of HDD space, clogging your registry and you have to worry about FPS all the time cause it NEVER STAYS FIXED!

quote:
I'm an avid PC gamer, and I have to say that your comments are completely unrealistic. At 7300 for a gaming machine? You'd be lucky to play year or two old titles on that. The fact is that if you have a console's price worth of money, you can't build a PC that can play the same quality games - and do it for the next 5 years. You also can't easily plug it into your TV, pop a disc in, and just play (though it's much closer to that now than it was 2 years ago.)

If you want to spend money on a machine that is only for games, buy a console. If you want the best experience and highest quality graphics, get a PC - but it'll cost you at least twice as much over the life of a console. Now if you want a PC to do other stuff, that has to be factored in as well. You're then only comparing the cost of making your Internet & email PC into something that can play games. This brings the cost closer, but only to about the point where it breaks even.

At this point really comes down to the games you want to play. I prefer to play sports or racing games on a console, while I play shooters or RTS games on a PC.
quote:


RE: Boring
By darkpaw on 7/2/2007 6:18:32 PM , Rating: 2
There is no need to buy a $500-600 video card ever, especially not every 2-3 years. A $200 card will usually last for 2-3 years of life.

My brother-in-law is still using a 9800Pro that cost $100 two years ago and while he can't get the latest and greatest, it still works decently in most games.

Console gaming is still a better deal in the long run in bang-for-buck, but for pure versatility the PC can't be beat.


RE: Boring
By Christopher1 on 7/2/2007 10:11:17 PM , Rating: 2
I have to agree with you. A 200 dollar PCI-X video card right now will last a good long time. I've been thinking of upgrading my parents computer recently, but I have to catalog the connections in their PC before I do that, and I'll be buying at most a $200 card.


RE: Boring
By luhar49 on 7/3/2007 4:12:03 AM , Rating: 2
Agree with you.
If you are looking for the excellent quality in latest games at a decent resolution like 22"+(1600x1080), you need to upgrade your graphic cards fast. I just got an ATI 2900XT recently. It cost me only 23% less than my PS3. Thats for the graphics card alone. Add the processor/mobo/RAM/PSU costs and I end up spending almost 2.5 times as much as the PS3.

PC gaming is certainly nice with all the eye candy and the mouse/keyboard support for FPS games. But it comes at a high cost.


RE: Boring
By BMFPitt on 7/3/2007 11:22:00 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
I heavily disagree with you, take $1000 and you may end up with a PC that can display graphics close to that of the 360 at $400.
You may, if you spent most of that money on hard drives or something.
quote:
And console gaming doesn't require a $600 video card every 2 years.
If PC gaming requires a $600 video card, the console gaming requires a $3000 TV. Both statements are absurd, but it's hard to claim one and deny the other.
quote:
and you don't have to worry about the bastard crashing constantly especially if you have that piece of garbage VISTA!
My install of Vista has crashed a total of zero times. Then again, my 360 hasn't had a RROD yet, either. Of course, I take it by your tone that you've never even seen Vista running.
quote:
err how in the world is PC Gaming better, no standard control scheme, NUTZO!
Mouse? Check. Keyboard? Check.
quote:
no one wants to take their Standard machines and shell out $500 for a video card for their $500 PC. You end up loosing a ton of HDD space, clogging your registry and you have to worry about FPS all the time cause it NEVER STAYS FIXED!
It sounds as if your favorite PC game is installing spyware. In that case, another big benefit of a console is protecting you from yourself.


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