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Performance NDA of the upcoming 1333 MHz front-side bus Core 2 Duo E6750 lifted

Intel today lifted the performance non-disclosure agreement, or NDA, for the first product of its Core 2 Duo E6x50-sequence lineup—the Core 2 Duo E6750. Despite being the first refreshed Conroe-based processor since the original Conroe debut, excluding Kentsfield, the Core 2 Duo E6750 clocks in below the dual-core flagship Core 2 Extreme X6800. Intel clocks the Core 2 Duo E6750 at 2.66 GHz, identical to the E6700.

New to the Core 2 Duo E6750 however, is a faster 1333 MHz front-side bus to match the new Bearlake chipset-family, including the new P35 Express. Besides the faster front-side bus, the new Core 2 Duo E6750 has an identical feature set to the E6700 including 4MB of shared L2 cache. Other Core 2 Duo E6x50-sequence processors have the same shared 4MB L2 cache configuration and Intel has no plans of releasing a 1333 MHz front-side bus processor with 2MB of L2 cache.

Intel Core 2 Duo
L2 Cache
FSBJuly 22nd
E68503.00 GHz 4MB1333 MHz
E6750 2.66 GHz 4MB1333 MHz
E6550 2.33 GHz 4MB 1333 MHz
E6540 2.33 GHz 4MB 1333 MHz

Intel Virtualization, Enhanced Intel SpeedStep, Intel 64 and Execute Disable Bit technologies make a return on the Core 2 Duo E6750 and E6x50-sequence processors. Intel Trusted Execution Technology, formerly known as La Grande, sneaks its way into the new Core 2 Duo E6750 and E6x50-sequence processors.

Expect a hard launch of the Core 2 Duo E6750 and E6x50-sequence processors in the coming weeks. Intel plans to launch four Core 2 Duo E6x50-sequence processors with speeds varying from 2.33 GHz to 3.0 GHz including a TXT-less E6540.

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FSB impact on quad core
By lplatypus on 6/25/2007 10:07:12 PM , Rating: 2
It would be more interesting to see the impact of increased FSB performance on a quad core Intel CPU, because the FSB is more likely to be the bottle-neck there: twice as many cores means more demand for memory access across the bus, plus there is extra traffic on the bus with the two dual-core dies communicating with each other.

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