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The OCZ Hydrajet cooler, featured upside-down to reaveal the carbon nanotube conductor. (Source DailyTech, Anh Huynh)
The OCZ Hydrojet cooler uses an advanced heatsink material

The first heatsink to make use of directional carbon nanotubes, the OCZ Hydrojet, was on display at Computex 2007. Carbon nanotubes, an allotrope of carbon, are widely regarded as the next major thermal interface material because of their superior thermal conduction properties.  

The contact base of the OCZ Hydrojet is made completely of carbon-nanotubes, which OCZ claims are five times more efficient than copper. Carbon nanotubes have been looked upon as a strong alternative to traditional copper based heatsinks. They are ideal for application in heat transfer products because of their impressive heat-conduction properties.  Carbon nanotube based interfaces have been shown to conduct more heat than conventional thermal interface materials at the same temperatures. In addition, they have shown to be ballistic conductors at room temperature, which means electrons can flow through CNTs without collisions.

Carbon nanotubes are small wire-like structures made out of a sheet of graphene.  The sheet of graphene used to construct CNTs is roughly one-atom thick, and is rolled up into a cylinder. The diameter of the cylinder ranges in the nanometers.

Unlike most other thermal materials, carbon nanotubes are able to move heat in one direction. On the other hand, copper, which is looked upon as one of the more superior thermal materials, moves heat radially. In the case of CNTs, heat is moved along the alignment of the nanotubes.


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RE: Mm,, interesting
By Peacemaker on 6/11/2007 3:42:51 AM , Rating: 2
Why don't you try or read about a product before you say something about it that might be completely wrong?

Yes, the reserator has a pump but it is silent. The only way you can heat the faint hum is by pressing your ear against the top, that's why they included a flow indicator so you can see if it's working.

Oil would increase performance (better heat dis.) and I could add a couple of blocks and somewhat sound-proof the hard drives to get close to silent pc...

Overclocking does get more out of the computer, the problem is that in order to really see benefits (FPS in games, faster apps) you need "drastic" measures (ever ran a compressor indoors?).

Regarding OC: It's all nice if OC can get me extra 10 FPS in Crysis when it comes out but I'll also get 80 dB's from the compressor needed run cooling to take all the extra heat away created by aiming for those 10 FPS in the first place.
Is it a viable day in day out solution? Nope. Besides, >stock voltage will shorten the lifespan. Chasing records is cool with extreme OC is cool as long as no one pretends that it'a still a regular desktop for daily (dare I say 24/7?) use.

Benefits one might get from a good (expensive) sound card may be nullified by noise today's computers make, that's where WC enters the equation. It's variables(passive active WC) that allow for "trade" between noise/efficiency in diff. coolers are what makes WC appealing to a wide array of consumers.


RE: Mm,, interesting
By Hare on 6/11/2007 9:28:57 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
Overclocking does get more out of the computer, the problem is that in order to really see benefits (FPS in games, faster apps) you need "drastic" measures (ever ran a compressor indoors?).

Really? I'm running my E6300 @ 3Ghz, performance increase (1.2Ghz oc) was easily noticed. Noise is not an issue. I have a Tuniq Tower at around 5V and it can't be heard outside the case.


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