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The OCZ Hydrajet cooler, featured upside-down to reaveal the carbon nanotube conductor. (Source DailyTech, Anh Huynh)
The OCZ Hydrojet cooler uses an advanced heatsink material

The first heatsink to make use of directional carbon nanotubes, the OCZ Hydrojet, was on display at Computex 2007. Carbon nanotubes, an allotrope of carbon, are widely regarded as the next major thermal interface material because of their superior thermal conduction properties.  

The contact base of the OCZ Hydrojet is made completely of carbon-nanotubes, which OCZ claims are five times more efficient than copper. Carbon nanotubes have been looked upon as a strong alternative to traditional copper based heatsinks. They are ideal for application in heat transfer products because of their impressive heat-conduction properties.  Carbon nanotube based interfaces have been shown to conduct more heat than conventional thermal interface materials at the same temperatures. In addition, they have shown to be ballistic conductors at room temperature, which means electrons can flow through CNTs without collisions.

Carbon nanotubes are small wire-like structures made out of a sheet of graphene.  The sheet of graphene used to construct CNTs is roughly one-atom thick, and is rolled up into a cylinder. The diameter of the cylinder ranges in the nanometers.

Unlike most other thermal materials, carbon nanotubes are able to move heat in one direction. On the other hand, copper, which is looked upon as one of the more superior thermal materials, moves heat radially. In the case of CNTs, heat is moved along the alignment of the nanotubes.


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RE: Mm,, interesting
By PlasmaBomb on 6/9/2007 6:28:11 AM , Rating: 2
It also depends what you are into, some people don't really need the performance and overclock for the challenge and enjoyment. Some people just like to have high end kit or something a bit different from the normal.

Don't forget if this is successful the prices will drop and you could well end up owning a CNT cooler in the future.


RE: Mm,, interesting
By Mojo the Monkey on 6/10/2007 4:30:59 PM , Rating: 3
I use watercooling and I dont overclock anything in my system at all. I do it for 2 reasons. First: noise. When my computer is on, its dead silent (I use a reserator; nothing but good things to say. the only moving fan is 135mm silent power supply fan). Second: its just fun. Working inside my computer is kind of a hobby.

This kind of product (nanotube) may be the kind of thing that allows for silent/passive cooling systems WITHOUT water. I mean, if my water cooling system ever gave out and there was a simply non-water, silent replacement for roughly the same cost, I would buy it. I dont think I'm alone when I say that I've HAD the computer that sounds like a jet taking off, but I'm never going back.


RE: Mm,, interesting
By Archmaille on 6/16/2007 4:21:00 PM , Rating: 2
See that's funny I use water cooling for the exact same reason! Well it's also nice to know that my computer will last much longer since enough though overclocked by 500mhz still runs cooler than it did with a Zalman CNPS9700. My system is dead silent and I love it (well, other than the four Delta TFB1212GHE fans that each put off 65 decibels)

Okay obviously I'm kidding about my computer running silent, but yes this shows two extremes of why someone might choose a more expensive water cooling setup. Mojo the Monkey here has it for silent operation, I on the other hand have it for extreme overclocking purposes. Sure I paid $500 for my water cooling setup, but seeing that my 3700+ is running at 30° C while at 2.7ghz is just plain awesome! If I can get better cooling from something that costs the same/less I say bring it on!!!


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