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Intel set to cut prices ahead of AMD's "Barcelona" launch

Last week, AMD talked about its desktop plans for the upcoming year in Sunnyvale, California. Although AMD showed its upcoming desktop processor running in single and dual-socket configurations, the company chose not to announce an official launch date for its next-generation desktop processors. According to Robert Rivet, AMD executive vice president and CFO, however, AMD's next-generation processors will be ready by Christmas.

Despite how distant the possible December launch date of AMD's native quad-core desktop processors may seem, Intel is already stepping up the competition and will be instituting a series of aggressive price cuts in July. We originally reported these major price cuts, which will be targeting Intel's quad-core desktop and server processors, in March. At the time, we didn't know the official date of when the price cuts would take place. We can confirm today that the price cuts will take place on July 22.

Intel Core 2 Quad
Model
Core
Frequency
L2 Cache
FSB July 22
Pricing
QX6800 2.93 GHz 8MB 1066 MHz
$999
Q6700 2.66 GHz 8MB 1066 MHz
$530
Q6600 2.40 GHz 8MB 1066 MHz
$266

The first part of the price cuts will center on Intel's quad-core desktop processors. The Q6600, which Intel launched in February, currently sells for $530 in quantities of 1000. When the product was originally launched, it was priced at $851 in quantities of 1000. The next round of price cuts will effectively lower the price to $266. The selling price of the Intel QX6700 will also be lowered, coming in at $530 by the end of July.

Intel Quad Core Xeon DP
Model
Core
Frequency
L2 Cache
FSBJuly 22
Pricing
X53653.00 GHz 8MB 1333 MHz
$1172
X5355 2.66 GHz8MB 1333 MHz
$744
E5345 2.33 GHz 8MB 1333 MHz
$455
E5335
2.00 GHz 8MB1333 MHz
$316
E53201.86 GHz 8MB 1066 MHz
$256
E5310
1.60 GHz 8MB1066 MHz
$209
L53201.86 GHz 8MB 1066 MHz
$320
L5310
1.60 GHz 8MB1066 MHz
$273

Intel is also slashing the prices of its quad core Xeon DP processors. The flagship Xeon DP X5355 will see its introductory $1172 price drop to a more manageable $744. Likewise, Intel's slowest 1333MHz FSB Xeon DP processor will drop to $316 while the Intel's two low-voltage Xeon DP L5320 and L5310 processors will fall to $320 and $273 respectively.


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Xeon DP vs. Core 2 Quad
By MrBungle on 5/15/2007 9:16:12 PM , Rating: 2
Sorry if this is a dumb question - I'm not that familiar with Xeon.

Given identical FSB speed and L2 cache, what would be the advantage(s) of going with, say, a Xeon DP L5310 (1.60 GHz) over the similarly priced Core 2 Quad Q6600 (2.40 GHz) for a home office workstation? Is it just that the former can be run on a dual-processor/server motherboard?

Also, would the Xeon in the example be less powerful than the Core 2 Duo, or are there additional specs to consider that may affect its processing capability?




RE: Xeon DP vs. Core 2 Quad
By Murst on 5/15/2007 10:41:19 PM , Rating: 2
The Xeons can run in multi-socket configurations, unlike the E6X00. Its the same as the A64s and Opteron chips. The only difference was the ability of the Opterons to run in multi-socket combinations (well, there may have initially been a different RAM requirement, as in registered dimms).

Also, I believe the E6X00 have the virtualization technology disabled, while it is enabled on the Xeons (very possible I'm completely wrong about this!)


RE: Xeon DP vs. Core 2 Quad
By theapparition on 5/16/2007 11:07:34 AM , Rating: 2
Yes, dual vs. single CPU sockets. They have different sockets and are not interchangeable. But the biggest factor is memory. All Xeon processors use FB-DIMM, which is much more expensive. Motherboard selection is also very limited. Unless you really need 2 CPU sockets, there is no reason to take that step.


RE: Xeon DP vs. Core 2 Quad
By MrBungle on 5/16/2007 8:28:25 PM , Rating: 2
Thanks, guys. Sounds like the Xeon is a bad idea for a home workstation - I'll be doing HD video capture/editing and compositing, but probably nothing severe enough that will ever require dual processors - I think 4 cores should be plenty.


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