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Devices with batteries that last all day and offer 50% more performance than 2008 devices

Just recently, Intel introduced its 2007 ultra-mobile computing platform. At IDF Beijing, Intel then demonstrated its Menlow platform. Targeted for 2008, Menlow contains a new 64-bit processor with clock frequencies near 2 GHz ,  DDR2 memory running at 400MHz or 533MHz, solid-state NAND flash memory and discrete graphics processing.

The big kicker for Menlow is its substantial improvement in battery life over available UMPC offerings. Menlow has approximately twice the life of current devices, reaching up to 6 hours of regular use and 10.5 hours of standby.

Before Menlow devices make it to the mainstream, Intel this week announced another major milestone for its ultra-mobile platform. Called Moorestown, Intel revealed that by roughly mid 2009, we will be able to see devices that consume 20 times less power than devices available in 2006. According to Intel roadmaps, Moorestown devices will be able to last a full day's of mixed productivity and leisure activities -- approximately 24 hours.

What sets Moorestown apart from previous processors is the fact that it combines CPU, GPU and memory controller functions into one chip. Essentially, this is the same intention that AMD has with its Fusion program. AMD's Fusion also encompasses mobile devices as well as desktops. It is only a matter of time before we see the same idea from Intel in the desktop space being applied to devices such as thin clients and budget PCs.

Moorestown's CPU will be 50-percent smaller in size than Silverthorne and consume roughly 50-percent less power. Intel will also be making Moorestown available as a single core or dual core system utilizing DDR3 memory. Despite having internal graphics, Intel is expecting that Moorestown will outperform Menlow's graphics by 50-percent.

What remains separate is simply the I/O controller, which too will be significantly small compared to current devices. Otherwise, Moorestown will be just as and more capable than Menlow in terms of features: WiMAX, hardware accelerated 3D such as OGL2.0, HD video decoding and others. Intel did not state whether or not Moorestown will support DX10 graphics and next generation WiMAX technologies.

Intel president and CEO Paul Otellini last said that performance and power consumption are two of the highest priorities for the chip giant going towards 2010. "By the end of the decade we will deliver a 300 percent increase in performance per watt over today's processors," said Otellini.


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Go Intel
By bamacre on 5/4/2007 5:54:03 PM , Rating: 3
Like them as a company, or not, you have to admit they are looking ahead, and looking good.




RE: Go Intel
By ObscureCaucasian on 5/4/2007 6:05:18 PM , Rating: 2
Thats what happens when you have resources to fund all these projects. AMD just doesn't have the resources to fund development for such an obscure platform at this time.


RE: Go Intel
By bupkus on 5/4/2007 9:54:59 PM , Rating: 3
quote:
What sets Moorestown apart from previous processors is the fact that it combines CPU, GPU and memory controller functions into one chip. Essentially, this is the same intention that AMD has with its Fusion program. AMD's Fusion also encompasses mobile devices as well as desktops. It is only a matter of time before we see the same idea from Intel in the desktop space being applied to devices such as thin clients and budget PCs.

What would we do without Intel's leadership?


RE: Go Intel
By Assimilator87 on 5/5/2007 12:51:28 AM , Rating: 2
Wow, it never occurred to me that the system on a chip chips would be perfect for this platform. For some reason, I only thought of it being used in media PCs. Hopefully AMD will be out with theirs pretty soon because it'll probably have better graphics capabilities than whatever extreme incarnation Intel comes up with.


RE: Go Intel
By JAB on 5/5/2007 7:07:49 AM , Rating: 1
quote:
What would we do without Intel's leadership?


The real question is where would we be without competition. Intel would not be a shadow of what it is if not for AMD and the same holds for AMD. It will be a sad day if Intel manages to stamp out the competition.


RE: Go Intel
By retrospooty on 5/5/2007 12:03:36 PM , Rating: 3
I agree, the competition is what has given us all of the fast CPU's at low prices we have today... If not for AMD's sucessin the past 5 years, we would still be choking on Intel P4 single core architecture, and paying through the nose for it.

I wouldnt worry, even if AMD goes under the CPU development and design will survive, perhaps under another companies fincial backing, or even name, but it WILL live on. Too much potential to just fade into oblivion.


RE: Go Intel
By Zandros on 5/6/2007 12:04:30 PM , Rating: 2
I'm not sure we would be using Pentium 4s, Intel at the time seemed more likely to transfer everything to IA64/EPIC. IMO it would have done the industry good to drop the legacy-riddled x86 architecture,


Intel's slides from HKEPC
By defter on 5/4/2007 4:57:41 PM , Rating: 2
From one week ago: http://www.hkepc.com/bbs/news.php?tid=777324&start...

The interesting thing about Menlow CPU, Silverthorne, is that it will be the first Core2 based CPU to support hyperthreading. Silverthorne will also have a very small die size, less than 35mm^2.




RE: Intel's slides from HKEPC
By Roy2001 on 5/4/2007 6:43:59 PM , Rating: 2
Silverthorne is less than 30mm^2 I believe.


Battery savings?
By MonkeyPaw on 5/6/2007 10:03:38 AM , Rating: 2
6 hours of normal use isn't too revolutionary. One can get that now by getting a high-capacity battery in a well-spec'd machine. Even at that, the chipset/CPU isn't where most of the energy savings will come from. My guess is the extra savings will come from OLED displays (or at least LCD-backlit displays), SDD HDDs, and more efficient wireless cards. A good mobile CPU+chipset only consumes 25-35W at load. It's everything else in the notebook that still needs some improvement.




RE: Battery savings?
By IntelUser2000 on 5/6/2007 9:16:09 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
6 hours of normal use isn't too revolutionary. One can get that now by getting a high-capacity battery in a well-spec'd machine. Even at that, the chipset/CPU isn't where most of the energy savings will come from. My guess is the extra savings will come from OLED displays (or at least LCD-backlit displays), SDD HDDs, and more efficient wireless cards. A good mobile CPU+chipset only consumes 25-35W at load. It's everything else in the notebook that still needs some improvement.


It's different because this is UMPC. 25-35W with chipset+CPU is extraordinarly high in UMPC market. TDP of Stealey will be 3W, Silverthorne will probably go down to 0.5W target made by Intel.


Not Intel but YOU in mind
By crystal clear on 5/5/2007 4:47:04 AM , Rating: 3
Here is something that has YOU in mind-You the buyer !
(I know its long.......)

During a recent conversation with Intel, which has been one of the first companies to show UMPC concepts and unveil some prototype devices a little over a year a ago, we learned that the initial concept of the UMPC has failed. While the form factor of the UMPC won’t go away, these devices have been less appealing to the mass market than expected and have been redirected to aim at the business market, for example field technicians who use bulky Tablet PCs today. If Intel has its way, then what once was the mass market UMPC will morph into much smaller and less powerful “mobile Internet devices,” short “MID”.

So, if you have been dreaming about that cool little tablet you can bring on vacation instead of dragging that notebook bag along, continue to dream. While MIDs will be more affordable, come in a smaller package and offer more connectivity options than today’s UMPCs, they will be far less capable in terms of processing power and storage capabilities.

If you take a minute to think about Intel’s idea - and Intel thinks that MIDs have a huge market opportunity with twice or three times the volume of the “new” UMPC - then you will notice that Intel is essentially trying to create a new product category, positioned between ultra mobile PCs (such as the UMPC and devices such as the OQO) and increasingly powerful smartphones, which are becoming computers themselves.

quote:
also


What the UMPC was supposed to be and what it became
..................(read on)

The problem of the UMPC

One year after the release of the first UMPC, it appears that no one in the industry really wants to talk about these devices anymore. Intel for example, excluded the term from its presentations to analysts on Thursday completely and has begun talking about MIDs instead. This development is especially interesting, as the company was heavily promoting UMPCs in various consumer scenarios just two months ago at the Cebit tradeshow in Germany. For example, we learned that UMPCs should take on the role of detachable car computers. That is unlikely to happen now.

So, what changed?

Obviously, we are in the midst of strategy shift. The reason: The industry has a lot more data about who is actually buying UMPCs today. Pankaj Kedia, ecosystem manager in Intel’s ultra mobile group told us that 60% of all UMPCs were actually purchased by businesses and the initially targeted mainstream market showed very little interest in this new product category.

Kedia cautioned that every new product category needs time to evolve and that even the notebook needed 12 years to hit sales of 1 million units per year. He explained that a product such as the UMPC will require about two to three years until a supporting ecosystem with supporting hardware and software as well as interest from customers will become significant. However, one could argue that the created expectations outpaced what the industry could deliver at the time and market research clearly missed what customers the UMPC could attract.

In fact, the discrepancy between product design, marketing and customer expectations may have been the ultimate reason to scrap the original idea of the mainstream UMPC altogether. While customers would expect a $500 UMPC that runs Windows Vista’s AeroGlass interface just as fast as dual-core notebook, a permanent connection to the Internet, a GPS navigation device, a slim solid state disk and a battery time of eight or more hours, the hardware and software of 2007 just isn’t there yet – and isn’t likely to get there in the foreseeable time.

While the marketing departments forgot to ask what is realistic these days and what is not, there appears to be also an issue with UMPC product management. The idea of the UMPC is a fantastic playground for innovation, but it actually is a lack of innovation that we saw over the past fourteen months. There was not a single hardware or software idea that was unique to the UMPC and that could take advantage of this form factor. Instead we saw efforts to simply create a smaller notebook (or a more capable PDA, depending on your view) with no extra benefit but extra inconveniences for the user.

http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/31899/113/1/1/




VIA CoreFusion
By lplatypus on 5/4/2007 9:59:41 PM , Rating: 2
This reminds me of the VIA CoreFusion CPU+GPU+Northbridge chips. How do they compare?

http://www.via.com.tw/en/products/processors/coref...




UMPC is not going to happen
By ChipDude on 5/5/2007 9:15:33 PM , Rating: 2
Despite the hype and increaing computational power and decreased power draw its a application still looking for a use.

For very special applications its going to be a big hit. For the general public we don't need or want it.

We got our cell phone / iphone
We got our MP3 player
We got our full featured laptop.

These when converged simply are a poor compromise in this form factory. I don't care the price of it or batter life. I want a big screen for sufing or a full sized key board. Or I will live with my phone. For playing music my nano can't be beat.

Here are two recent articles on UMPC for your reading pleasure:

http://www.tgdaily.com/content/view/31899/113/

http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/may...




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