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Samsung 51nm 16Gb MLC NAND flash memory
Samsung beefs up its MLC NAND flash

Samsung has announced that it is the first company to begin mass production of 16Gb NAND flash memory. The new 51 nanometer (nm) memory is based on a multi-level cell (MLC) structure and is 60 percent more efficient than its 60nm counterpart.

"In rolling out the densest NAND flash in the world, we are throwing open the gates to a much wider playing field for flash-driven consumer electronics," said Jim Elliott, Samsung Semiconductor's director for flash marketing. "To minimize production costs and improve performance, we have applied the finest process technology a ‘half generation’ ahead of the industry, which is introducing 55nm and higher."

The 51nm NAND flash memory chips are also as much as 80 percent faster than current 60nm MLC-based products. The new MLC design offers read speeds of 30MB/sec and write speeds of 8MB/sec as opposed to 17MB/sec and 4.4MB/sec for the previous generation.

The 16Gb NAND chips will be used in devices offering up to 16GB of storage space in a single package. Samsung will target digital memory cards, MP3 players and cell phones with its new high capacity 51nm 16Gb NAND chips.

Samsung will also offer a new suite of flash software to allow cell phones and MP3 players to take advantage of 4KB pages instead of the 2KB pages now used with 60nm NAND flash memory. The memory chips will also support 4-bit error-correcting code (ECC).

"As the demand for video content grows stronger by the day, products that feature extended recording time of high-resolution video footage, including mid-to-high-range digital cameras, will particularly benefit from the high capacity and performance of 16Gb NAND flash memory," Samsung said in a press statement.

Samsung is currently shipping the 16Gb memory chips and expects availability in the mainstream market by year's end.



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Excellent
By mezman on 4/30/2007 3:26:30 PM , Rating: 3
Not only is this good for the future of flash devices, as previously said, I look forward to 16GB and 32GB compact flash cards for my camera! :)




RE: Excellent
By Nyu on 4/30/2007 4:06:29 PM , Rating: 2
You guys took it wrong, it's 16 Gigabits, not GigaBYTES, aka 2 GB.


RE: Excellent
By Serlant on 4/30/2007 4:32:58 PM , Rating: 2
quote:
The 16Gb NAND chips will be used in devices offering up to 16GB of storage space in a single package. Samsung will target digital memory cards, MP3 players and cell phones with its new high capacity 51nm 16Gb NAND chips.


maybe you missed this bit?


RE: Excellent
By Oregonian2 on 4/30/2007 5:25:28 PM , Rating: 2
The problem is the lower case 'b'. That by convention (Gb) means 'bit', a capital 'b' (as in GB) is taken to mean byte. So the article (even though I think it's a subset of Samsung's press release) may have a translation error. But is, in any case, what was being commented on by the other fellow. Samsung makes 32 Gb flash in a 73 um process, so these new ones in 51 um could indeed be 128 Gb (16 GB) units. In any case, the article's title states it to be a 16 GigaBIT memory, by convention.

Could also be that the "16 GB of storage space in a single package" refers to the memory card's package where eight of Samsung's new smaller 16 Gb chips could fit to make 16GB. That's a possibility too.
Depends on how the Korean was translated to English.


RE: Excellent
By PlasmaBomb on 4/30/2007 7:59:33 PM , Rating: 3
I think that mezman knew that if you used 8 in a device you could get 16GB. If you used 16 in a SSD and wired it correctly you could get some speed out of it!

And it's nm not um...


RE: Excellent
By Oregonian2 on 5/1/2007 1:58:23 PM , Rating: 2
Yup, "duh!". Heck, I've did a 2 um gate-array ASIC, what, 15~20 years ago? 73 um would be gargantuan! Our coffee machine was broken yesterday, so my brain was dysfunctional all day (okay, no smiling about how you think I'm always that way....).


I like...
By SilthDraeth on 4/30/2007 3:00:15 PM , Rating: 2
But I am curious, will this help increase the density and lower the cost of solid state drives for PCs?




RE: I like...
By Mudvillager on 4/30/2007 3:32:42 PM , Rating: 3
Yes


Thank God For Technology
By Yeah Yeah on 4/30/2007 1:55:39 PM , Rating: 2
Just when you thought it couldn't get any cooler. Now you can store enough music on your phone to completely shut your family out on a long vacation. Technology rules. Slap that bad boy in a phone please. Also, give me one for beta testing, thanks!




RE: Thank God For Technology
By Yeah Yeah on 4/30/2007 1:57:07 PM , Rating: 2
also, our old buddy ram was looking like he was gonna go on a technology hiatus. Glad he chose not to.


16GB in a Single Pack?
By iwod on 4/30/2007 2:16:54 PM , Rating: 2
Does this have Samsung's Mutiple Stack on a chip yet? And is this any good for SSD?




Pretty nice!
By DragonMaster0 on 4/30/2007 3:21:26 PM , Rating: 2
It would be great to have an SSD with a few of these chips paralleled together.




Good for iPod Nano, iPhone
By dcalfine on 4/30/2007 4:08:29 PM , Rating: 2
Who wants an 8GB PMP?




Faster Please!!
By CollegeTechGuy on 5/1/2007 4:56:13 PM , Rating: 2
I know flash memory itself is fast, but I wanna see the interface get faster. Give me something faster than USB 2.0 and i'll be happy. Cause i'm imagining installing an OS on one of these babies and booting it anywhere. Sure the first time I plug it in a new system it'll have to load drivers for new hardware...but once I get it setup on a few systems I can go anywhere with my OS and my Desktop and not have to worry about slow VPNs.




"So if you want to save the planet, feel free to drive your Hummer. Just avoid the drive thru line at McDonalds." -- Michael Asher











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