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GeForce 8600 GTS - Gigabyte GV-NX86S256H

GeForce 8600 GT - Gigabyte GV-NX86GT256H

GeForce 8500 GT - Gigabyte GV-NX86T256H

MSI NX8600 GTS

MSI NX8500 GT
NVIDIA pulls the wraps off its new mainstream products

NVIDIA today announced its latest DirectX 10 product offerings to serve the $129-$229 price points. The new GeForce 8600 GTS, 8600 GT and 8500 GT introduces technology previously exclusive to the high-end GeForce 8800-series to more affordable levels. NVIDIA’s new mainstream product lineup features Shader Model 4.0 support, GigaThread technology and NVIDIA’s Quantum Effects physics processing technology. The addition of NVIDIA’s Lumenex engine to the mainstream sector provides value-conscious buyers with 128-bit floating point HDR rendering and anti-aliasing levels of 16x.

The new mainstream flagship is the GeForce 8600 GTS, which takes the spot previously held by the GeForce 7900 GS. NVIDIA slots the GeForce 8600 GTS below the GeForce 8800 GTS 320MB, which currently occupies the $299-$329 price points. GeForce 8600 GTS based products fill in the $199-229 price points. GeForce 8600 GTS-based products feature 32-stream processors clocked at 1.45 GHz. NVIDIA has set the reference core and memory clock speeds at 675 MHz and 1.0 GHz, respectively.

Catering to the $149-159 price points is the slightly detuned GeForce 8600 GT. GeForce 8600 GT-based products feature 32-stream processors as with the GeForce 8600 GTS; however, NVIDIA detunes the shader clock down to 1.18 GHz. Reference core and memory clock speeds are set at 540 MHz and 700 MHz, respectively. NVIDIA slots the GeForce 8500 GT at the bottom of its new mainstream product lineup. The new GeForce 8500 GT fills in the $89-$129 price points with its 16-stream processors. NVIDIA clocks the 16-stream processors at 900 MHz on the value-oriented offering. Reference core and memory clock speeds of the GeForce 8500 GT are 450 MHz and 400 MHz, respectively.

All three new models feature support for NVIDIA’s PureVideo HD video processing technology. PureVideo HD technology remains unchanged from the previous product generation. Nevertheless, PureVideo HD provides hardware acceleration for H.264, VC-1 and MPEG-2 high-definition and standard-definition video formats.

NVIDIA GeForce 8-series
Model
8600 GTS 8600 GT
8500 GT
8800 GTS
Stream processors
32 32 16 96
Core clock
675 MHz 540 MHz 450 MHz 500 MHz
Shader clock
1.45 GHz
1.18 GHz 900 MHz 1.2 GHz
Memory clock
1.0 GHz 700 MHz 400 MHz 900 MHz
Memory interface
128-bit 128-bit 128-bit 320-bit
Memory bandwidth
32 GB/sec 22.4 GB/sec 12.8 GB/sec 64 GB/sec
Texture fill rate (Billion/sec)
10.8 8.6 3.6 24

NVIDIA does not integrate HDCP support for its GeForce 8600 and 8500 products. Add-in board manufacturers will have to purchase external EEPROMs with HDCP keys. Expect GeForce 8600 GTS-based products to all have HDCP support. NVIDIA does not require HDCP support on GeForce 8600 GT and 8500 GT based products. Manufacturers are free to include or exclude the feature at their own discretion.

Expect NVIDIA’s new products to hit retail immediately after the announcement. AMD expects to launch its attack on the GeForce 8600 and 8500-series next month with its upcoming ATI Radeon HD 2600 and HD 2400.


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RE: R600...where are u...
By AndreasM on 4/17/2007 8:13:25 AM , Rating: 2
quote:
The truth is as long as Nvidia does not have a driver for vista


http://www.nvidia.com/object/winvista_x86_100.65.h...
http://www.nvidia.com/object/winvista_x64_100.65.h...

Both are WHQL certified. One can argue about their quality (haven't personally bothered to install Vista yet so I have no clue), but claiming that they don't exist is incorrect.


RE: R600...where are u...
By SpaceRanger on 4/17/2007 9:45:53 AM , Rating: 3
While they ARE WHQL Certified, I would hardly call them solid performing drivers. I'm currently using the Beta 101.41's and I'm still not pleased with the performance I am getting out of them.

I'd like to see more effort put into release better drivers than crippled hardware (compared to their GTX counterparts).


RE: R600...where are u...
By othercents on 4/17/2007 11:05:17 AM , Rating: 3
This could still be an issue with Vista since all manufacturers are having issues with performance. Microsoft changed a bunch of things which was the same problem we had moving from Windows 98 to Windows XP. It is just going to take time and usually going to take game developers to changed the way the game interacts with the video card.

Not everyone has the extra money to spend on the top of the line cards, but DX10 cards available in everyone's price range will generate more sales than updating drivers for early adopters to a new operating system. Plus I'm sure that Nvidia has multiple teams running that have different tasks. One for hardware development and another for Software/Driver development.

Other


RE: R600...where are u...
By SpaceRanger on 4/17/2007 11:31:32 AM , Rating: 2
I'm aware there are multiple teams for multiple tasks (R&D, etc.), but the team behind the Driver Development has not been performing all that great (from the eyes of a consumer).


RE: R600...where are u...
By jrb531 on 4/17/2007 12:23:30 PM , Rating: 2
Going to make a small change in your comment....

Not everyone has the extra money to spend on the top of the line cards, but DX9 cards available in everyone's price range will generate more sales than updating drivers for early adopters to a new operating system. Plus I'm sure that Nvidia has multiple teams running that have different tasks. One for hardware development and another for Software/Driver development.

See what the change was? *points to DX9*

Does anyone remember those great "first to market before the drivers were finished" DX9 cards were?

Anyone?

Anyone?

Why the now "infamous" "FX" cards... namely the 5200, 5600 and 5800 cards that were perhaps the very worst cards Nvidia ever produced. Also remember that the FX cards actually ran the then current DX8 code very well but when real DX9 games came out the fireworks began.

While I'm not saying that the 8xxx cards will be a bust in DX10 the similarities are interesting. The 8xxx's run DX9 code very well and the new drivers are late, lacking and untested in real DX10 games.

After the last incident I am no longer taking Nvidia's word for it that they will be killer DX10 cards. I'll wait and see once real DX10 games come out and not some DX9 games with minor DX10 "hacks" added.

-JB


"A politician stumbles over himself... Then they pick it out. They edit it. He runs the clip, and then he makes a funny face, and the whole audience has a Pavlovian response." -- Joe Scarborough on John Stewart over Jim Cramer

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