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Viva Pinata discs don't actually have the color barcode...yet - Image courtesy SeattlePI
Microsoft develops color barcode that consumers can read with their cell phones

Just as televisions have once evolved, the long-standing monochromatic barcode could soon be getting the bump to color. Microsoft has developed what it calls High Capacity Color Barcode (HCCB) technology is licensing it to the International Standard Audiovisual Number International Agency (ISAN-IA). The HCCB technology will be used to assist in the identification of commercial audiovisual works such as motion pictures, video games, broadcasts, digital video recordings and other media.

"The capability of these new bar codes to store more data in a smaller space should provide a rich resource for the industry and consumers alike," said Gavin Jancke, director of engineering for Microsoft Research and inventor of the HCCB format. "The new code offers several advantages over existing black-and-white bar codes most people are accustomed to seeing on product packages, enabling new consumer experiences, more visual appeal where aesthetics are important and the ability to incorporate advanced security features."

Current ISAN codes allow an audiovisual work to be uniquely distinguished from other works through a simple identification system, but they do not allow additional features or functions to be incorporated. For the consumer, such features could be such as product versioning, ratings identification, parental control, product availability, special releases, contests, pricing and promotions. On the publisher side, new functionality could be detailed data that can aid in royalty payments, anti-counterfeiting efforts and market analysis.

Microsoft said that consumers may soon be able to interact with the new barcodes by scanning the code with webcams and camera phones to extract the added information. Eventually, consumers should be able to scan the new, smaller bar codes directly from television, PC screens, movie posters, DVD and CD jewel cases, magazine ads and billboards to retrieve additional information.

The colored barcode will also involve physical measures against counterfeiting by incorporating nanotechnology that is invisibly embedded within the material and ink of the code and product packaging.

The new multicolor bar code is expected to start appearing on DVD media toward the end of 2007.



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AWESOME
By Yeah Yeah on 4/16/2007 10:58:30 AM , Rating: -1
Can't wait for my government issue barcode now!!!
These are just more money spent on garbage. B&W works fine, why change it? Aesthetics? Come on. An artsy barcode? Can't wait till some fags start collecting these and start discussing what the artist thought when making that particular barcode. More shit we have to pay for...




RE: AWESOME
By Yeah Yeah on 4/16/07, Rating: 0
RE: AWESOME
By Hare on 4/16/2007 11:16:56 AM , Rating: 2
Seriously. How much more do you think a product would cost with a better barcode?

Black and white barcodes work fine but what if you want to include more information? What's so bad with this type of barcode? Do you work for a competing company or something?

I personally wouldn't mind "scanning" a barcode with my cellphone to see the products webpage or let's say get a table of contents from a book.

This is not a substitute to the old B&W barcode that checkout lines use.

Btw. With that kind of language even if you had a point you would still sound like a moron.


RE: AWESOME
By s12033722 on 4/16/2007 8:14:42 PM , Rating: 2
Uh, no. The point of color is not to look pretty, but rather to allow a single dot to carry more information. With black and white, a dot is either black or not black - two states, on or off. With color, the dot can be black, white, green, blue, or red (assuming they don't branch out into more colors). That's 5 states per dot now, which means more information in the same area.


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