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A Windows Vista Capable logo in the wild
Lawsuit may have forced Microsoft to change what it means to be Vista Capable

Two weeks ago, Dianne Kelley started a class-action lawsuit against Microsoft alleging the software company is engaging in deceptive practices by branding new computers with a Windows Vista Capable logo even if they couldn't run the all the new operating system’s features.

Although Microsoft strongly refutes Kelley’s claims, the threat of a lawsuit may have triggered the company to change its language on what “Vista Capable” means. As clipped by a blog at the Seattle Times, Microsoft originally described its Windows Vista Capable program as the following (all bold emphasis added by Seattle Times author):

“Through the Windows Vista Capable program, Windows XP-based PCs that are powerful enough to run Windows Vista are now available from leading PC manufacturers worldwide, including Acer Inc., Dell Inc., Fujitsu Limited, Gateway Inc., HP, Lenovo, NEC Corp., Sony Corp., Toshiba and more. The Windows Vista Capable logo is designed to assure customers that the PCs they buy today will be ready for an upgrade to Windows Vista and can run the core experiences of Windows Vista.

Shortly following the news of the lawsuit, the explanation of the Windows Vista Capable program appeared to have changed to this:

“A new PC running Windows XP that carries the Windows Vista Capable PC logo can run Windows Vista. All editions of Windows Vista will deliver core experiences such as innovations in organizing and finding information, security, and reliability. All Windows Vista Capable PCs will run these core experiences at a minimum. Some features available in the premium editions of Windows Vista — like the new Windows Aero user experience — may require advanced or additional hardware.”

While both the original and updated descriptions mention that Vista Capable means being able to run the “core experience,” the updated passage clearly states those experiences will run at a minimum.



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By wetwareinterface on 4/9/2007 10:09:12 PM , Rating: 2
i saw a few comments that seemed to indicate that some dailytech posters don't get it.

the vista basic operating system installs from the same disk as home premium or ultimate only restricting the advanced features. has the same kernal (which isn't windows xp's kernal), has the same desktop sidebar, and general look and feel of vista and all the seperate features are in the same identical locations and are accessed in the same way as the more expensive vista premium and up (with the exception of course of the features that aren't accessible at all due to not being in basic).

so in effect vista basic is vista not "xp with a few tweaks". so therefore vista basic is the minimum vista experience ergo vista capable means if you can run the lowest version of vista which happens to be basic you are still running vista and microsoft is not at fault if you were expecting otherwise.

just because it doesn't have aero doesn't mean it isn't vista. aero is an add on that comes with the more expensive version as is media center, and even more higher end shadow file system and data backup on the business version.

microsoft put out different versions for a reason because vista is a new operating system with new features and a new kernal etc... they made a stripped down version to enable those with crap machines without good 3d cards to be able to run the new os in a stripped down basic version.

and some people seem to be bashing the company for doing it.
microsoft just released a product, partnered with vendors to make sure that cheap systems could run a version and had a labeling program to let consumers know if their machine was going to be able to run the new os from microsoft if they were buying in the interim period just before it was released.

if you wanted to run aero you should know what you want to run. if that is then the case you should know that 3d elements require 3d acceleration to run at a reasonable expectation and with reasonable stability. now if you don't have that hardware who is to blame because you didn't understand what you wanted in the first place? microsoft? hp/dell? or yourself?




By mindless1 on 4/12/2007 9:51:40 AM , Rating: 2
Yes you should know, without having ambiguity like the vista ready badge.

I think you don't get it. Vista is XP with a few tweaks (to GUI), except for the UNDESIRABLE aspects. So essentially I feel Vista basic < XP Home.

It is no offsetting factor that there are multiple versions of vista, that's quite WHY it is so important to stipulate exactly how appropriate any particular PC is, not just a generic badge on it. If we claim a prospective buyer should do the research, then by the same token the badge shouldn't exist at all as it was meant to be an alternate path instead of that research.


By burlingk on 4/15/2007 5:12:35 AM , Rating: 2
Did you not read what he posted?
Have not actually read the Vista packaging?
Have you done any research on Vista at all?

Explain to me, if it is just XP Tweaked, why there have been so many hickups in the process of bringing software up to date to run with it?

Do you know what differentiates one OS from another? It is not the GUI. It is the kernel. I would expect people in this kind of forum to know what a kernel is, and how to seperate it from the GUI.

The interface could be the exact same interface tweaked, retooled, and recompiled, but if the kernel is different, then everything else is going to run different.

Most of the problems that people are experiencing are because they assume it is XP upgraded. It is not. It is like buying a cat, and wondering why it barks funny.

Please people, before you go running your mouths off, look at both sides of the story, not just the bad or good press. Look at the subject of your conversation, and think about it.

The labels I have seen were pretty self explanitory, and the machines that said they were Premium ready were all pretty high end. The ones that said Vista Capable by the time I saw them, already had some version of Vista on them and running, even if it was only Basic.

If you have a low end machine, then make sure it meets the specs, and get basic. Don't install Ultimate and expect it all to play nice with your old hardware.

Believe me, I am no fan of Microsoft, and I happen to like older hardware now and then, but this is getting just plain dumb.

When you post, post with your mind, not with your ego. If you get pissed off by something someone types, then wait till you cool down to respond. Think about facts, not hype. And most of all, if you are going to state that something is a true fact, then make sure that it is first!


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