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Chart of one week top ten and since-inception top ten HD DVD and Blu-ray

Information on the top 25 Blu-ray and HD DVD sold in 2007

Movie studios compared across the formats as of the week ending March 18

A comparison of HD DVD and Blu-ray over both formats' lifetime - All figures provided by SPHE
Latest sales figures show Blu-ray Disc outselling HD DVD seven to three

Sony, a clear backer of the Blu-ray Disc, has released a special report on the next-generation format’s current lead over HD DVD. Although the source of the report leads to immediately brings up the issue of obvious bias, the numbers cited come from reputable retail point-of-sake statistics source Nielsen VideoScan.

Sony Pictures Home Entertainment was likely spurred to release the report based on the success of Casino Royale on Blu-ray Disc. The latest Bond flick debuted at the top of the next-gen format sales charts with 28,233 units, making it the fastest selling high-def disc to date. The release of Casino Royale also boosted Blu-ray sales 74.4 percent for the week ending March 18 as compared to the previous week. In comparison, HD DVD sales fell 14.1 percent compared to the week before that.

Blu-ray’s strong sales since the beginning of 2007 have given it a 7 to 3 sales ratio versus HD DVD. Year to date sales of Blu-ray are 549,730 units and for HD DVD 249,451 units.

Blu-ray’s lead isn’t as strong, however, when looking at cumulative sales since each format’s inception. Total sales for Blu-ray Disc are around 844,000 and for HD DVD an approximate total of 708,600 units. Blu-ray surpassed HD DVD in total units sold during mid-February.

In terms of movies, seven out of the top 10 best selling high-def movies of all time are Blu-ray titles. For the week ending March 18, nine out of 10 were Blu-ray titles. The only HD DVD to crack that week’s is The Departed in fifth place, while the Blu-ray version held second place.

Sony Pictures Home Entertainment also broke down the high-def format unit market share. For Blu-ray, Sony leads with 32.2 percent, followed by Warner at 19 percent and Fox at 13.7 percent. For HD DVD, Warner accounts for 47.3 percent, followed by Universal with 38.3 percent and Paramount at 12.1 percent.

Although Nielsen VideoScan statistics are generally indicative of market trends, they do not include Wal-Mart and some online merchants. Sony’s choice to publish its findings after analyzing the latest numbers is a clear indication of the confidence that Blu-ray Disc has in winning the format war. Still, Blu-ray only took the lead from HD DVD in 2007, which HD DVD supporters blame on their format’s relatively sluggish recent months. With high-definition movie sales figures being insignificant when compared to the numbers that DVD sells, both HD DVD and Blu-ray have a ways to go before either one can truly be declared a winner.

For Sony Pictures Home Entertainment's full report, download the PDF document here courtesy of Digital Bits.



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RE: D. None of the above
By Visual on 4/10/2007 1:32:38 PM , Rating: 2
Online storage would be the best for cases such as yours. And no, I'm not saying that you should rip and upload all of your content yourself.

Imagine if the content providers kept an electronic database of the movies you've payed license for, and you can download any one of them any time you want, anywhere you want to watch it. Yes I know waiting to download 30 or 50GB whenever you want to watch something isn't a great idea with current connection speeds, but they're getting faster and faster with time... some day soon?


RE: D. None of the above
By masher2 (blog) on 4/10/2007 2:35:32 PM , Rating: 3
> "Yes I know waiting to download 30 or 50GB whenever you want to watch something isn't a great idea with current connection speeds, but they're getting faster and faster with time... some day soon? "

True. But my point was, by the time thats feasible for the average consumer, we're going to have formats much larger than 30GB. So don't hold your breath for optical discs to disappear soon.


RE: D. None of the above
By jtesoro on 4/11/2007 5:38:28 AM , Rating: 2
There's going to be some limit where higher quality formats will hit significant diminishing returns in movies. Part of this will be attributed to practical size limits in TVs (e.g. for space reasons, most TVs won't be monster 100-inchers even if people could afford them). Another part will be the fact that most people can't notice the difference in HD resolutions even today (e.g. 720p vs 1080p in a 32 inch LCD).

So while there will be a place for the super high-res, high-bitrate content that is best fulfilled by optical discs, the market for lower quality, easy-to-access downloadable/streamed movies will come. Not soon, but maybe not too far off either.


RE: D. None of the above
By CorrND on 4/10/2007 2:53:44 PM , Rating: 2
I can't wait for the day when this will be true, but my guess is we're looking at at least five years until someone even thinks of doing this. At current peak broadband connections (10Mb/s = 1.25MB/s), downloading a 30GB HD movie would take:

30,000MB / 1.25MB/s = 24,000s = 400min = 6hrs 40min

And that's only if a content provider could consistently provide you data at that speed, your ISP could consistently provide you that much bandwidth, and your ISP doesn't have download caps!

Bandwidth to your house will probably need to be 2 to 3 times faster before downloading HD movies becomes reasonable and probably 6 to 8 times faster before streaming becomes possible.

I think we've got some waiting to do...


"The whole principle [of censorship] is wrong. It's like demanding that grown men live on skim milk because the baby can't have steak." -- Robert Heinlein

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